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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 6 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 06: A Crossroads of Diffusion: Southwest Asia/North Africa SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

In this unit students learn about Southwest Asia/North Africa as a culture region that has historically been a crossroads of cultural and economic exchange. As the birthplace of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, the region is home to a diversity of ethnic groups. Several nations in the region benefit economically from the abundance of oil, yet much of the region is plagued by a shortage of water. Many of the issues that affect this region today stem from the formation of the current political boundaries following the First World War and the formation of Israel after the Second World War. Additionally, the region has experienced political upheaval following the revolutions collectively known as the “Arab Spring” of 2011. An examination of Southwest Asia/North Africa is important for students to understand the role religion plays in culture along with how the management of key resources and the diffusion of technology affect culture. 

Prior to this Unit

In the previous unit, students examined the political, economic and cultural changes that resulted from the breakup of the Soviet Union.

During this Unit

In this unit students examine the relationship between religion and culture in Southwest Asia/North Africa, how new political patterns emerged in the region following the world wars, how the availability of water and oil affect economic patterns in the region, and how the diffusion of technology has affected culture changes in the region. All social studies skills expectations are included in this unit to support the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit students study about political, economic, and social challenges faced by many cultures in Sub-Saharan Africa after gaining independence from former European colonial powers. 


Humans have a complex relationship with the environment.

  • What is characteristic of the interactions between humans and the environment?

Competition for power over territory, resources, and people leads to tension and conflict.

  • Why have societies not been successful at avoiding conflict?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Three monotheistic religions trace their origins to Southwest Asia and influence cultural patterns in the region today.

  • How is culture and the cultural landscape in Southwest Asia influenced by the religions that originated in the region?
  • What is similar and different about the religions that originated in Southwest Asia?
  • How did the physical geography of Southwest Asia facilitate the spread of religious traditions?

Cultural Patterns

  • Belief systems
  • Customs/Traditions

Historical Processes

  • Diffusion
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Political patterns in Southwest Asia/North Africa have changed several times with the redrawing of boundaries following the First World War and the formation of Israel after the Second World War.  

  • Why were new borders created in Southwest Asia following the First World War?
  • What cultural problems were created when new boundaries were created in Southwest Asia?
  • How did the creation of the state of Israel affect people living in Southwest Asia/North Africa?

Spatial Patterns

  • Regions/Borders

Cultural Patterns

  • Ethnicity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The scarcity of water and the availability of oil in Southwest Asia/North Africa affect economic patterns and relationships between nations in the region.

  • Which countries in Southwest Asia/North Africa benefit from having oil and which do not?
  • How is economic development different for “oil rich” nations in Southwest Asia/North Africa than for those that are not?
  • How are political relationships affected by the availability of oil in Southwest Asia/North Africa?
  • How have people living in Southwest Asia adapted to the lack of water in the region?
  • How has the environment been modified in Southwest Asia/North Africa?

Economic Patterns

  • Scarcity/Choices
  • Resources

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction

Scientific/Technological Patterns

  • Infrastructure
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Cultural diffusion and the introduction of new technologies facilitated the demands for political change in many nations in Southwest Asia/North Africa.

  • What role did the internet play in the 2011 political revolutions in Southwest Asia/North Africa?
  • What ideas led to the 2011 political revolutions in Southwest Asia/North Africa?
  • How successful have the 2011 political revolutions been at bringing about democratic changes in Southwest Asia/North Africa?
  • What areas of Southwest Asia/North Africa are still experiencing political upheaval? Why?

Political Patterns

  • Revolution

Historical Processes

  • Diffusion
  • Ideas/Innovation

Civic Engagement

  • Democratic Principles

Science/Technology Patterns

  • Communication Systems
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Unit performance tasks are intended to serve as an additional assessment resource, especially for classrooms implementing performance/project based instructional models. Teachers may choose to use performance tasks as one large unit encompassing assessment in conjunction with incorporating the performance assessments as instructional processing activities or as an alternative to administering all of the unit performance assessments.  Please consult the Unit Performance Tasks Best Practices resource for a more in-depth guide to implementation of performance tasks as an assessment tool. 

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students may believe that the region is mostly or entirely desert.
  • Students may not be aware of the cultural diversity of the region, believing it to be primarily Arab, and may be unaware that Turks and Persians constitute separate, ethnic groups.
  • Students may have a negative opinion of Islam and not be aware that it derives from the same tradition as Judaism and Christianity and shares a number of characteristics with both faiths.
  • Students may believe that all countries in the region produce petroleum, and that all of the countries in the region are wealthy as a result, and may not be aware of the significant inequality between and within the nations of Southwest Asia and North Africa.
  • Students may associate the region with violence, terrorism, and war.

Unit Vocabulary

  • monotheism- belief in one god
  • scarcity – condition where there is not enough of a product to meet demand for the product
  • desalinization – process of removing salt from seawater to make fresh water

Related Vocabulary

  • fossil fuels
  • renewable resource
  • non-renewable resource
  • ethnicity
  • transportation corridor
  • OPEC
  • cultural landscape
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
New6.1 The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to:
New6.1A Trace characteristics of various contemporary societies in regions that resulted from historical events or factors such as colonization, immigration, and trade.

Trace

CHARACTERISTICS OF SOCIETIES THAT RESULTED FROM HISTORICAL EVENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • Political systems vary as the nations in the region are newly constituted with the fall of the Ottoman Empire after the end of World War I; many nations in the region ruled by unlimited governments, such as the monarchy in Saudi Arabia and the dictatorial regime in Syria; limited governments in the region are in place in Turkey, Israel and Iraq; Iran is an example of a theocracy in the region
    • As of the spring of 2011 the region has been marked by political upheaval starting with revolt in Tunisia and then spreading to Libya, Egypt, and Syria where civil war has resulted
    • Conflict between Israel and Palestine has roots in Jewish immigration to the region and European involvement in partitioning the region following World War I
    • A variety of ethnic groups live within the region, including Arabs, Persians, Turks, Armenians, Kurds, and Jews because the region has served historically as a crossroads of travel and trade
    • Economic development in the region varies with some nations having huge revenues from the exportation of oil, such as Saudi Arabia and Iraq while others such as Egypt do not; most operate market economies
    • A variety of languages are spoken in the region with Arabic predominating because of the historical spread of Islam in the region during the 8th century
    • Most practice Islam, yet the region is home to Jews, especially in Israel and Christian communities also, because of the historic development of these religions in the region
New6.1B Analyze the historical background of various contemporary societies to evaluate relationships between past conflicts and current conditions.

Analyze

HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF SOCIETIES

Evaluate

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAST CONFLICTS AND CURRENT CONDITIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia/ North Africa –the ending of the First World War resulted in the creation of new boundaries in the region
New6.3 The student understands the factors that influence the locations and characteristics of locations of various contemporary societies on maps and/or globes. The student is expected to:
New6.3C Identify and locate major physical and human geographic features such as landforms, water bodies, and urban centers of various places and regions.

Identify, Locate

PHYSICAL AND HUMAN GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF VARIOUS PLACES AND REGIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • Landforms – Arabian Peninsula, Sahara Desert, Atlas Mountains, Zagros Mountains
    • Water bodies – Tigris River, Euphrates River, Nile River, Red Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Caspian Sea
    • Urban centers – Tehran, Cairo, Jerusalem, Mecca, Istanbul
New6.3D Identify the location of major world countries for each of the world regions.

Identify

LOCATION OF MAJOR WORLD COUNTRIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • Iraq, Afghanistan, Israel, Iran
New6.4 The student understands how geographic factors influence the economic development and political relationships of societies. The student is expected to:
New6.4A Explain the geographic factors responsible for the location of economic activities in places and regions.

Explain

GEOGRAPHIC FACTORS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE LOCATION OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Physical geographic factors – favorable climate conditions, access to fertile soil, access to water, access to natural resources
  • Human geographic factors – availability of labor, access to capital resources, proximity to transportation corridors for moving both products and consumers, availability of energy sources, political stability
New6.4B Identify geographic factors such as location, physical features, transportation corridors and barriers, and distribution of natural resources that influence a society's political relationships.

Identify

GEOGRAPHIC FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE SOCIETY’S POLITICAL RELATIONSHIPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Location and physical features
    • Particular locations, such as near water make it easy to delineate physical borders of a territory.
    • Countries which are landlocked may find it difficult to delineate boundaries and may have to gain permission to access other regions, making economic development difficult.
    • Countries located in high mountain ranges may find it difficult to develop economically, yet may be protected from invasion.
  • Transportation corridors and barriers
    • Transportation corridors facilitate economic development as influence political relationships between trading partners.
    • Barriers to transportation such as deserts may provide protection from invasion, yet may also make it difficult to provide for communication across a territory.
  • Distribution of natural resources
    • Societies rich in natural resources have the potential for economic development, which influences political relationships with trade partners in need of those natural resources. Societies rich in natural resources may be able to isolate from other societies.  
New6.5 The student understands the impact of interactions between people and the physical environment on the development and conditions of places and regions. The student is expected to:
New6.5B Identify and analyze ways people have adapted to the physical environment in various places and regions.

Identify, Analyze

WAYS PEOPLE HAVE ADAPTED TO THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • A variety of clothing is used to adapt to various climates
  • Terrace farming is used as an adaption for farming in elevated regions
  • Desalinization of saltwater is an adaption used in regions where fresh water is scarce
  • Air conditioning is used to adapt to hot/humid climate regions
  • Introduction of crops that are conducive to the surrounding climate, such as planting rice in wet areas
  • Use of sunscreen to adapt to living in regions with intense sunlight
  • Modifying structures to adapt to hazardous weather conditions, such as elevating homes in regions that experience heavy flooding because of precipitation brought with monsoon winds, or building to withstand earthquakes, or digging below permafrost to underpin buildings
New6.5C Identify and analyze ways people have modified the physical environment such as mining, irrigation, and transportation infrastructure.

Identify, Analyze

WAYS PEOPLE HAVE MODIFIED THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Mining – allows for the extraction of natural resources; may result in erosion of the soil, pollution of soil, ground water, and surface water
  • Irrigation – allows for the expansion of farming and ranching into areas that lack water resources
  • Transportation infrastructure – allows for the increasing movement of people and products via canals, highways, airports
  • Deforestation – removing forests for the expansion of commercial ventures including agriculture, most notable in Amazon River region of Brazil
  • Diverting water sources – Aral Sea has shrunk considerably in size because of a policy to divert water from two rivers which supplied the sea
  • Desertification – results from overgrazing as well as diverting water sources, such as with Lake Chad
  • Dams – allows for flood control and the production of hydroelectricity, examples include Three Gorges Dam (China), Aswan (Egypt), Ataturk (Turkey)
  • Ozone hole created by chemicals – Australia and New Zealand most effected as the populations in this region are experiencing higher rates of skin cancer as a result of exposure to ultra-violet rays; public health campaign has been instituted to alert people in the region to the danger of sun exposure and promote the use of sunscreen
  • Overfishing in Pacific Islands
New6.6 The student understands the factors of production in a society's economy. The student is expected to:
New6.6A Describe ways in which the factors of production (natural resources, labor, capital, and entrepreneurs) influence the economies of various contemporary societies.

Describe

WAYS FACTORS OF PRODUCTION INFLUENCE ECONOMIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • The region is characterized generally by developing economic systems. Many nations in the region benefit economically from the exportation of oil, while some do not. Turkey is an example in the region of a developed economy that lacks oil production. Capital gains from the sale of oil have allowed some nation, such as Saudi Arabia to invest in infrastructure, such as desalinization plants. Other oil wealthy nations such as Dubai have access to entrepreneurs and labor migrates to the nation. Where oil is not available as a natural resource, such as in Egypt, a young, often well-educated labor pool cannot find jobs. 
New6.6B Identify problems that may arise when one or more of the factors of production is in relatively short supply.

Identify

PROBLEMS THAT MAY ARISE WHEN FACTORS OF PRODUCTION ARE IN SHORT SUPPLY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Natural resources in short supply – if the demand is high such as with petroleum, countries have to rely on other nations that may have an overabundance of that resource. This often leads to inflated prices on natural resources with high demand. Some countries develop economies based predominately on one crop (monoculture).
  • Labor in short supply – results in migration, outsourcing, enslavement of people
  • Capital in short supply – countries remain underdeveloped, foreign investment may result in multi-national influence on a nation’s economic system
  • Entrepreneurs in short supply – countries that are unable to provide for public education and are underdeveloped will likely not have entrepreneurs willing to invest in the region; lack of job creation or innovation in industries
New6.6C Explain the impact of the distribution of resources on international trade and economic interdependence among and within societies.

Explain

IMPACT OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF RESOURCES ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND ECONOMIC INTERDEPENDENCE AMONG AND WITHIN SOCIETIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • The distribution of resources creates trade relationships between societies that have resources that are in demand by societies that do not have those resources. For example the interdependence of societies has increased over time as the demand for energy sources, most significantly oil, has grown over time. 
  • Today the parts for many products are produced in a variety of places to be assembled in one location. This contributes to the economic interdependence among societies.
New6.13 The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in various world societies. The student is expected to:
New6.13D Identify and explain examples of conflict and cooperation between and among cultures.

Identify, Explain

EXAMPLES OF CONFLICT AND COOPERATION BETWEEN AND AMONG CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • Camp David Accords, Oslo Accords, OPEC as examples of cooperation
    • Israeli-Palestinian conflict
    • Sectarian divide in Iraq as an example of conflict
New6.14 The student understands that all societies have basic institutions in common even though the characteristics of these institutions may differ. The student is expected to:
New6.14B Compare characteristics of institutions in various contemporary societies.

Compare

CHARACTERISTICS OF INSTITUTIONS IN SOCIETIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Comparisons of the characteristics of  governmental institutions may include political systems, rights given to citizens, voting qualifications, laws
  • Comparisons of the characteristics of economic institutions many include the type of economic activities, the availability of resources, gender roles in economic activities
  • Comparisons of the characteristics of education institutions may include years of formal schooling, types of school for boys and for girls, types of informal schooling
  • Comparisons of the characteristics of religious institutions may include various religious observances and rituals, architecture of religious buildings  
New6.14C Analyze the efforts and activities institutions use to sustain themselves over time.

Analyze

EFFORTS AND ACTIVITIES INSTITUTIONS USE TO SUSTAIN THEMSELVES OVER TIME

Including, but not limited to:

  • In order to maintain a particular society’s institutions, the values, norms and expectations of that society need to be passed from generation to generation. This is accomplished through a variety of means, including formal and informal education, and the controlling of information.
New6.15 The student understands relationships that exist among world cultures. The student is expected to:
New6.15B Identify and describe factors that influence cultural change such as improvements in communication, transportation, and economic development.

Identify, Describe

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE CULTURAL CHANGE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Improvements in communication – facilitates the spread of ideas, especially with the advent of the Internet, which allows for communication across national borders more easily
  • Transportation – facilitates travel and migration coupled with cultural diffusion; allows for the movement of goods to more places
  • Economic development – facilitates the ability to access communication and transportation to a wider degree, hence promoting cultural diffusion; cultural landscapes begin to look similar with economic development reaching more places
New6.15C Analyze the impact of improved communication technology among cultures.

Analyze

IMPACT OF IMPROVED COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY AMONG CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Information spreads more widely and faster.
  • Widespread use of technologies to communicate and access information makes state censorship more challenging.
New6.15D Identify the impact of cultural diffusion on individuals and world societies.

Identify

IMPACT OF CULTURAL DIFFUSION ON INDIVIDUALS AND WORLD SOCIETIES

Including, but not limited to

  • Southwest Asia and North Africa
    • Exposure to ideas about democracy has led to an increase in demand for the same level of civic participation and human rights at home.
New6.17 The student understands the relationships among religion, philosophy, and culture. The student is expected to:
New6.17A Explain the relationship among religious ideas, philosophical ideas, and cultures.

Explain

RELATIONSHIP AMONG RELIGIOUS IDEAS, PHILOSOPHICAL IDEAS, CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • New religious and philosophical ideas emerged as humans explored the nature of human existence and the nature of human relationships.
  • Cultures are distinguished by the religious ideas and/or philosophical ideas which have been adopted and passed on through generations.
  • Belief systems are considered an element of culture which influence cultural institutions and practices
  • Religious and philosophical ideas can influence the cultural landscape and institutions of a region such as with differences of architecture, organization of governments, and traditions among social groups.
New6.18 The student understands the influences of science and technology on contemporary societies. The student is expected to:
New6.18C Make predictions about future social, political, economic, cultural, and environmental impacts that may result from future scientific discoveries and technological innovations.

Make

PREDICTIONS ABOUT FUTURE SOCIAL, POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, CULTURAL, AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS FROM FUTURE DISCOVERIES AND INNOVATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Predictions about future impacts could relate to the following:
    • Development of aerospace and communication technologies
    • Creation of alternative energy sources
    • Development of new medical and life-saving devices and/or drugs
New6.19 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
New6.19A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as oral, print, and visual material, and artifacts to acquire information about various world cultures.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS WORLD CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Oral materials
  • Print materials
  • Visual material
  • Artifacts
New6.19B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
New6.19C Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Outlines
  • Reports
  • Databases
  • Visuals
    • Graphs
    • Charts
    • Timelines
    • Maps
New6.19D Identify different points of view about an issue or current topic.

Identify

DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW ABOUT AN ISSUE OR CURRENT TOPIC
New6.20 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
New6.20A Answer geographic questions, including: Where is it located? Why is it there? What is significant about its location? How is its location related to the location of other people, places, and environments? Using latitude and longitude, where is it located?

Answer

GEOGRAPHIC QUESTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Where is it located? Position on a map (absolute location vs. relative location), latitude and longitude
  • Why is it there? trade routes, altitude, availability of natural resources, transportation corridor
  • What is significant about its location? historically, economically, socially, politically
  • How is its location related to other people, places, and environment? conflicts, cultural diffusion, climate, availability of resources
  • Where do people live and not live? Why?
  • How does geography affect migration patterns?
  • What patterns are evident in the demographic make-up, language distribution, and distribution of religious groups in the world?
New6.20B Pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns for various world regions and countries shown on maps, graphs, and charts.

Pose, Answer

QUESTIONS ABOUT GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND PATTERNS

Including, but not limited to:
Possible questions to pose related to any region of study.

  • How does climate affect settlement patterns (where people live) in this region/country?
  • How does physical geography affect settlement patterns (where people live) and migration patterns (where people move to and from) in this region/country?
  • How does physical geography facilitate/impede trade in this region/country?
  • How has physical geography affected the spread of languages, religions and ethnic groups?
New6.20C Compare various world regions and countries using data from maps, graphs, and charts.

Compare

WORLD REGIONS AND COUNTRIES

Including, but not limited to:
Possible comparisons to make

  • Levels of development
  • Standard of living
  • Voting participation
  • Types of economic activities
  • Levels of education
  • Gross domestic product
  • Settlement patterns over time
  • Demographics
  • Literacy rates
New6.20D Create and interpret regional sketch maps, thematic maps, graphs, and charts depicting aspects such as population, disease, and economic activities of various world regions and countries.

Create, Interpret

REGIONAL SKETCH MAPS, THEMATIC MAPS, GRAPHS, CHARTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Creation of regional sketch maps by students
  • Thematic maps may depict population patterns, climate regions, language distribution, religious patterns, ethnic patterns, economic activities
  • Charts and graphs may depict birth rate, death rate, population growth rate, life expectancy, literacy level, GDP, average family size
New6.21 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
New6.21A Use social studies terminology correctly.

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY

New6.21B Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication based on research.

Incorporate

MAIN, AND SUPPORTING IDEAS IN VERBAL AND WRITTEN COMMUNICATION BASED ON RESEARCH

New6.21D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies based on research.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL BASED ON RESEARCH

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
New6.21E Use effective written communication skills, including proper citations to avoid plagiarism.

Use

EFFECTIVE WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Correct grammar and punctuation
  • Accurate spelling
  • Clear diction and sentence structure
  • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
TEKS# SE# Unit Level Developing TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
New6.21 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
New6.21C Express ideas orally based on research and experiences.

Express

IDEAS ORALLY BASED ON RESEARCH AND EXPERIENCES

New6.22 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
New6.22A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/17/2019
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