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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 2 Science
TITLE : Unit 01: Investigating Matter SUGGESTED DURATION : 21 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles Student Expectations that address the classification of matter based on physical properties. The properties of matter can be changed by the application of outside forces, including the addition and removal of heat. Materials can be combined to perform functions that the individual materials cannot perform.

 

Prior to this Unit

  • Kindergarten
    • K.5A – Observe and record properties of objects, including bigger or smaller, heavier or lighter, shape, color, and texture.
    • K.5B – Observe, record, and discuss how materials can be changed by heating or cooling.
  • Grade 1
    • 1.5A
      – Classify objects by observable properties such as larger and smaller, heavier and lighter, shape, color, and texture.
    • 1.5B – Predict and identify changes in materials caused by heating and cooling.
    • 1.5C – Classify objects by the materials from which they are made.

 

During this Unit

Students use simple descriptive investigations and scientific equipment to classify matter, compare physical changes in matter, and demonstrate how the physical properties of materials can influence their use. Students classify matter by physical properties and states of matter. This is students’ first encounter with flexibility and states of matter. Furthermore, students compare changes in materials caused by heating and cooling and demonstrate things can be done to materials to change their physical properties. Finally, in this unit, students identify a problem and propose a task and solution by combining materials that when put together, can do things that they cannot do by themselves and justify the selection of materials based on their physical properties. Additionally, students communicate and discuss their observations and record and organize data in their notebooks. Students continue to demonstrate safe and healthy practices as outlined in the Texas Education Agency-approved safety standards and consider environmentally appropriate and responsible practices with resources during investigations.

 

Streamlining Note

TEKS 2.5A removed “shape” due to redundancy, and it removed “relative mass” due to developmental appropriateness. 2.5C revised language for clarity. See the Science TEKS Streamlining Side by Side Grade 2 (link in System Resources below).

 

After this Unit

In Unit 04: Investigating Patterns in Weather, students will measure temperature using a thermometer and measure liquid precipitation using a rain gauge.

Grade 3 students will measure, test, and record physical properties of matter; describe and classify samples of matter by state; predict, observe, and record changes in state caused by increasing and decreasing thermal energy; and explore and recognize mixtures.

 

Additional Notes

STAAR Note

The Student Expectations in this unit are foundational to Grade 5 Scientific Investigation and Reasoning skills and Supporting and Readiness Standards that may be assessed on the Grade 5 Science STAAR.

 

Research

Students should examine and use a wide variety of objects, categorizing them according to their various observable properties. They should subject materials to such treatments as mixing, heating, freezing, cutting, wetting, dissolving, bending, and exposing them to light to see how they change. Even though it is too early to expect precise reports or even consistent results from the students, they should be encouraged to describe what they did and how materials responded.

“By the end of the 2nd grade, students should know that:

  • Water can be a liquid or a solid and can go back and forth from one form to the other. If water is turned into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water is the same as it was before freezing. 4B/P2
  • Objects can be described in terms of their properties. Some properties, such as hardness and flexibility, depend upon what material the object is made of, and some properties, such as size and shape, do not. 4D/P1*
  • Things can be done to materials to change some of their properties, but not all materials respond the same way to what is done to them. 4D/P2”

American Association for the Advancement of Science. (2009). Benchmarks on-line. Retrieved from http://www.project2061.org/publications/bsl/online/index.php?chapter=9#A1.


Scientists investigate the natural world in order to understand and explain its systems.

  • Why is it important to know about and understand the natural world?
  • How are systems and their parts organized?
  • How are the components (parts), processes, and patterns of systems connected?

 

Scientific investigation is an orderly process to ensure that scientific claims are trustworthy.

  • Why is it important to be able to trust scientists’ work?
  • How do scientists make and support their claims?
  • What processes help scientists investigate their claim?

 

Data is collected and organized in an orderly manner, and analyzed by looking for patterns and relationships in order to develop reasonable explanations and make predictions.

  • What are some ways data can be organized?
  • How can data be used to make reasonable explanations?
  • How do patterns help us understand the natural world?

 

Scientists analyze, assess, and review each other’s work using processes of scientific investigations, and build on one another’s ideas through new investigations.

  • How can we know what to believe about a scientific claim?
  • Why do scientists work together to study new ideas?
  • Why is it important to know and understand how things work and why things happen?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Matter can be classified based on its physical properties.

  • In what ways are physical properties used to describe and classify matter?

 

The properties of a type of matter can change depending on changes that are applied to it.

  • In what ways can the physical properties of matter be changed?
  • In what ways can applying changes to an object or material change its physical properties?

 

Properties of materials can be changed by heating or cooling.

  • In what ways might the properties of materials change when they are heated?
  • In what ways might the properties of materials change when they are cooled?
  • In what ways does water change when heated or cooled?

Systems

  • Matter

 

Classification

  • Solid
  • Liquid
  • Bendable (Flexible)
  • Stiff
  • Hot / warm
  • Melted
  • Runny
  • Cold / cool
  • Frozen
  • Hard
  • Soft
  • Smooth
  • Bumpy
  • Rough

 

Properties

  • Relative temperature
  • Texture
  • Flexibility
  • State of matter

 

Patterns

  • Change of state

 

Models

  • Melting
  • Freezing

 

Constancy

  • Scientific investigation

 

Change

  • Physical properties of matter
  • Change of state
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Materials can be combined to do things that the individual materials cannot do.

  • In what ways do physical properties of materials determine their use?
  • How can materials used by themselves function differently than materials used together to build a structure?

System

  • Matter

 

Classification

  • Materials

Properties

  • Physical properties

 

Models

  • Structure

 

Constancy

  • Scientific investigation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

Misconceptions:

  • Students may think heat and temperature are the same, rather than understanding heat is a form of energy and temperature is a measure of how hot or cold something is.
  • Students may think only adults can design structures or solve problems.

Unit Vocabulary

Key Content Vocabulary:

  • Cooling – the process of becoming cooler; a falling temperature; removing heat
  • Flexibility – bending easily without breaking
  • Freezing – to change from a liquid to a solid by removal of heat (cooling)
  • Heating – the process of becoming warmer; a rising temperature; adding heat
  • Liquid – matter that takes the shape of its container, filling the bottom of the container first
  • Matter – the material that everything is made of
  • Melting – to change from a solid to a liquid by adding heat
  • Physical properties – properties of matter that can be observed, measured, or changed without changing the matter itself
  • Relative temperature – relates to comparison of the temperature of two objects or days using a thermometer, such as cooler, warmer, more hot
  • Solid – matter with a definite shape and size
  • Unit – an accepted quantity used as a standard of measurement, such as the meter, liter, and gram

 

Related Vocabulary:

  • Beaker
  • Centimeter
  • Change
  • Classify
  • Cutting
  • Flexible
  • Folding
  • Hard
  • Heat
  • Identify
  • Light
  • Liquid
  • Load
  • Material
  • Melt
  • Primary balance
  • Problem
  • Runny
  • Ruler
  • Sanding
  • Solution
  • Span
  • Task
  • Texture
  • Thermometer
  • Unit of measurement
Unit Assessment Items System Resources Other Resources

Show this message:

Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.

State:

Texas Education Agency – Texas Safety Standards

http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5483 (look under Documents)

 

Texas Gateway for Online Resources by TEA – Interactive Science Glossary

https://www.texasgateway.org/resource/interactive-science-glossary


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • Unit-specific clarifications are in italicized, blue text.
  • Information from Texas Education Agency (TEA), Texas College and Career Readiness Standards (TxCCRS), and American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Project 2061 is labeled.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
2.1 Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student conducts classroom and outdoor investigations following home and school safety procedures. The student is expected to:
2.1A Identify, describe, and demonstrate safe practices as outlined in Texas Education Agency-approved safety standards during classroom and outdoor investigations, including wearing safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate, washing hands, and using materials appropriately.

Identify, Describe, Demonstrate

SAFE PRACTICES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Wearing safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate
  • Washing hands
  • Using materials appropriately
  • Follow classroom and outdoor safety guidelines, as outlined in Texas Education Agency-approved safety standards

Note(s):

2.2 Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student develops abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry in classroom and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:
2.2A

Ask questions about organisms, objects, and events during observations and investigations.

Ask

QUESTIONS DURING OBSERVATIONS AND INVESTIGATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Objects
2.2B Plan and conduct descriptive investigations.

Plan, Conduct

INVESTIGATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Descriptive

Note(s):

  • TEA:
    • Descriptive investigations involve collecting qualitative and/or quantitative data to draw conclusions about a natural or man-made system (e.g., rock formation, animal behavior, cloud, bicycle, electrical circuit). A descriptive investigation includes a question, but no hypothesis. Observations are recorded, but no comparisons are made and no variables are manipulated. Descriptive investigations (Texas Education Agency. (2007-2011). Laboratory and Field Investigations –FAQ, August 2010. Retrieved from http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5483)
2.2C Collect data from observations using scientific tools.

Collect

DATA FROM OBSERVATIONS USING SCIENTIFIC TOOLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Use tools appropriately
  • Possible examples may include:
    • Hand lenses
    • Rulers
2.2D Record and organize data using pictures, numbers, and words.

Record, Organize

DATA

Including, but not limited to:

  • Pictures
  • Graphs
    • Pictographs
    • Bar graphs
  • Numbers
  • Words
2.2E Communicate observations and justify explanations using student-generated data from simple descriptive investigations.

Communicate

OBSERVATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Student-generated data from simple descriptive investigations

Justify

EXPLANATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Making claims from observations
  • Providing evidence from observations in order to support claims
  • Using reasoning to explain or justify the claims

Note(s):

  • TEA:
    • Descriptive investigations involve collecting qualitative and/or quantitative data to draw conclusions about a natural or man-made system (e.g., rock formation, animal behavior, cloud, bicycle, electrical circuit). A descriptive investigation includes a question, but no hypothesis. Observations are recorded, but no comparisons are made and no variables are manipulated. Descriptive investigations (Texas Education Agency. (2007-2011). Laboratory and Field Investigations –FAQ, August 2010. Retrieved from http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5483)
2.3 Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student knows that information and critical thinking, scientific problem solving, and the contributions of scientists are used in making decisions. The student is expected to:
2.3A Identify and explain a problem and propose a task and solution for the problem.

Identify, Explain

A PROBLEM

Including, but not limited to:

  • Grade level appropriate problems

Propose

A TASK AND SOLUTION FOR THE PROBLEM

Including, but not limited to:

  • Possible task
    • Observe and research the problem
  • Propose a solution
2.3C Identify what a scientist is and explore what different scientists do.

Identify

WHAT A SCIENTIST IS

Explore

WHAT DIFFERENT SCIENTISTS DO

Including, but not limited to:

  • Specific disciplines scientists study
2.4 Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to investigate the natural world. The student is expected to:
2.4A

Collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, rulers, plastic beakers, magnets, collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles or chemical splash goggles, as appropriate; timing devices; weather instruments such as thermometers, wind vanes, and rain gauges; and materials to support observations of habitats of organisms such as terrariums and aquariums.

Collect, Record, Compare

INFORMATION USING TOOLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computers
  • Hand lenses
  • Rulers (cm)
  • Notebooks
  • Safety goggles or chemical splash goggles
2.5 Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has physical properties and those properties determine how it is described, classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:
2.5A Classify matter by physical properties, including relative temperature, texture, flexibility, and whether material is a solid or liquid.

Classify

MATTER BY PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Physical properties – properties of matter that can be observed, measured, or changed without changing the matter itself
  • Matter – the material that everything is made of
    • Relative temperature (as it relates to comparison of the temperature of two objects)
      • Cooler
      • Warmer
      • Hotter
    • Texture
      • Rough
      • Smooth
      • Bumpy
      • Soft
      • Hard
    • Flexibility (ability to bend)
      • Bendable / flexible
      • Rigid / stiff
    • Solid or liquid 

Note(s):

  • This is students’ first encounter with states of matter.
  • This is the only encounter students will have with the physical property of “flexibility” at the elementary level.
  • Project 2061: By the end of 2nd grade, the student should know that:
    • Objects can be described in terms of their properties. Some properties, such as hardness and flexibility, depend upon what material the object is made of, and some properties, such as size and shape, do not. 4D/P1*
2.5B Compare changes in materials caused by heating and cooling.

Compare

CHANGES IN MATERIALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Caused by heating
    • Melting – to change from a solid to a liquid by adding heat
      • Possible examples of materials that can melt:
        • Ice
        • Chocolate
        • Candle
  • Caused by cooling
    • Freezing – to change from a liquid to a solid by loss of heat (cooling)
      • Possible examples of materials that can freeze:
        • Water
        • Juice

Note(s):

  • STAAR:
    • Although not identified as a Supporting Standard, this student expectation builds the foundation for the content of Supporting Standard 3.5C.
  • Project 2061: By the end of 2nd grade, the student should know that:
    • Water can be a liquid or a solid and can go back and forth from one form to the other. If water is turned into ice and then the ice is allowed to melt, the amount of water is the same as it was before freezing. 4B/P2 
2.5C Demonstrate that things can be done to materials such as cutting, folding, sanding, and melting to change their physical properties.

Demonstrate

THAT THINGS CAN BE DONE TO MATERIALS TO CHANGE THEIR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Cutting
    • Shape
    • Size
    • Texture
    • Weight
  • Folding
    • Shape
    • Size
  • Sanding
    • Color
    • Shape
    • Size
    • Texture
    • Weight
  • Melting
    • Color
    • Shape
    • Size
    • Texture

Note(s):

  • STAAR:
    • Although not identified as a Supporting Standard, this student expectation builds the foundation for the content of Supporting Standard 5.5C.
  • Project 2061: By the end of 2nd grade, the student should know that:
    • Things can be done to materials to change some of their properties, but not all materials respond the same way to what is done to them. 4D/P2
2.5D Combine materials that when put together can do things that they cannot do by themselves such as building a tower or a bridge and justify the selection of those materials based on their physical properties.

Combine

MATERIALS THAT WHEN PUT TOGETHER CAN DO THINGS THAT THEY CANNOT DO BY THEMSELVES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Building a tower or a bridge
    • Possible materials may include:
      • Craft sticks
      • Paper clips
      • Rubber bands
      • Paper
      • Toothpicks
      • Note cards
      • Straws

Justify

THE SELECTION OF MATERIALS BASED ON THEIR PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Justification of selection of materials based on:
    • Size
    • Shape
    • Color
    • Texture
    • Flexibility
    • Relative temperature
    • Weight
    • Liquid or solid

Note(s):

  • According to Process Standard 2.2B, students are required to plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations.
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 08/13/2019
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