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Instructional Focus Document
World Geography Studies Regional
TITLE : Regional Unit 07: Southwest Asia SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit continues the examination of the world’s major regions by applying the knowledge gained in the previous units. An examination of regions is intended to facilitate students’ knowledge about 1) natural conditions of various regions, 2) human conditions of various regions, and 3) an understanding of the human connections made within a region and across regions. Such connections are evident in human patterns of migration and human-environment interaction. Throughout the remainder of the course students examine various regions by exploring the following questions in regards to each regional unit of study:

  1. Where is it?
  2. What is it like there in both physical and human terms?
  3. How would the character of this place be described?
  4. How have the physical landscape and human characteristics of this place changed over time?
  5. How is this place linked physically, economically, culturally to other places?
  6. How is this place similar or different when compared to other places?
  7. What influence does this place have on other places?
  8. How does knowing about this place helpin understanding the world better?

This unit bundles student expectations that facilitate an examination of the physical and human geographic factors that characterize Southwest Asia as a region and the connections between this region and the world. The region is characterized by a variety of political systems from monarchy to republic. The region is predominantly Islamic and home to a variety of ethnic groups including Arabs, Persians, Kurds, Jews, and Turks. The region is also characterized by nations that economically benefit from the sale of oil as well as others who lack oil as a resource. During the twentieth century political boundaries in the region have changed several times, including after the end of the First World War and with the creation of the state of Israel. Current unrest in the region exemplifies how the creation of these borders has exacerbated ethnic tensions.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about Russia, the Caucasus, and Central Asia as regions. 

During this Unit

During this unit, students study about how physical geography affects settlement patterns in Southwest Asia, about the influence of the monotheistic religions on the cultural patterns and cultural landscape of Southwest Asia, about the changes made to the political boundaries in Southwest Asia, and about the unequal distribution of oil and water in Southwest Asia.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students study about the physical and human characteristics that distinguish Africa as a region and the connections between the region and the world.


Competition for power over territory, resources, and people leads to tension and conflict.

  • Why have societies not been successful at avoiding conflict?

Humans have a complex relationship with the environment.

  • What is characteristic of the interactions between humans and the environment?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

The climate and the contrasts in the physical landscape of Southwest Asia affect the settlement patterns of the region.

  • What is characteristic about the distribution of climate regions and biomes in Southwest Asia?
  • How does physical geography, including climate affect settlement patterns in Southwest Asia?
  • How does conflict in Southwest Asia impact settlement patterns?

Spatial Patterns

  • Population Distribution
  • Climate
  • Ecosystems/Biomes
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Cultural patterns and the cultural landscape of the Southwest Asia reflect the historic development of monotheistic religions in the region.

  • How are the three monotheistic religions that originated in Southwest Asia reflected in the cultural landscape and cultural patterns?
  • What is characteristic of language patterns in Southwest Asia?
  • What are the basic tenets of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam?
  • Where did Judaism, Christianity and Islam spread to from their origins in Southwest Asia?

Cultural Patterns

  • Belief Systems
  • Customs/Traditions

Spatial Patterns

  • Place
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Political boundaries in Southwest Asia have changed several times in the twentieth century resulting in tension and conflict in the region.

  • How did the political boundaries of Southwest Asia change following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire?
  • How did the creation of new borders in Southwest Asia after the First World War bring about ethnic tensions and the rise of terrorism in the region?
  • Why did the creation of the state of Israel contribute to conflict in Southwest Asia?
  • What types of political systems were created in Southwest Asia following the end of the First World War?

Spatial Patterns

  • Region/Borders

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The abundance of oil and the lack of water affect relationships between nations in Southwest Asia as well as the region’s interactions in the world.

  • How have nations in Southwest Asia that lack access to water adapted?
  • What examples are there of how scarcity of water has caused tensions in the region?
  • How does the unequal distribution of oil in Southwest Asia affect relationships between countries in the region?
  • Why was the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) formed? 
  • How does the abundance of oil in Southwest Asia affect relationships between oil-rich nations and the places that import the oil?

Economic Patterns

  • Scarcity/Choices
  • Resources

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction

Scientific/Technological Patterns

  • Energy Sources

Historical Processes

  • Conflict/Cooperation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Unit performance tasks are intended to serve as an additional assessment resource, especially for classrooms implementing performance/project based instructional models. Teachers may choose to use performance tasks as one large unit encompassing assessment in conjunction with incorporating the performance assessments as instructional processing activities or as an alternative to administering all of the unit performance assessments. Please consult the Unit Performance Tasks Best Practices resource for a more in-depth guide to implementation of performance tasks as an assessment tool.

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students may mistakenly think Arabs and Muslims are synonymous. Arabs are an ethnic group, whereas Muslim refers to the followers of the religion of Islam.
  • Students sometimes think that all Arabs are Muslim and that all Muslims are Arabs.
  • Students lack understanding that multiple ethnic groups live in Southwest Asia.
  • Students sometimes think that all the nations in Southwest Asia have large oil reserves.
  • Students sometimes think the region has been characterized by conflict for all of recorded history, yet the modern conflicts in the region were brought about with the breakup of the Ottoman Empire following the First World War and the resulting divisions that were created.

Unit Vocabulary

monotheism – belief in one god
desalinization – the process of removing salt from seawater
border – the line that indicates the end of a territory
terrorism – using violence or the threat of violence to create fear in an effort to bring about social or political changes
tenets – basic principles adopted by a group

Related Vocabulary:

  • modification
  • adaptation
  • monarchy
  • republic
  • OPEC
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
NewWG.2 The student understands how people, places, and environments have changed over time and the effects of these changes. The student is expected to:
NewWG.2A Describe the human and physical characteristics of the same regions at different periods of time to analyze relationships between past events and current conditions.

Describe, Analyze

HUMAN AND PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SAME REGIONS AT DIFFERENT PERIODS OF TIME TO EVALUATE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PAST EVENTS AND CURRENT CONDITIONS

Including, but not limited to:
Human Characteristic to analyze for change over time

  • Development of governments, economies, cultural convergence
  • Events like war, revolution, exploration, trade have an impact on societies over time, including changes in city landscapes and cultural landscapes

Physical Characteristics to analyze for change over time

  • Domestication of plants and animals and the use of different geographic features (e.g., plains for agriculture)
  • The expansion or decline of environment regions (e.g., the expansion of the Sahara and the decline of tropical rainforests)
  • Major geological events on civilizations
NewWG.4 The student understands the patterns and characteristics of major landforms, climates, and ecosystems of Earth and the interrelated processes that produce them. The student is expected to:
NewWG.4C Explain the influence of climate on the distribution of biomes in different regions.

Explain

THE INFLUENCE OF CLIMATE ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF BIOMES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Biomes or ecosystems are defined by a specific community of plants and animals that inhabit that region. Biomes are classified into four main categories: forests, grasslands, deserts, and tundra.

Forests

  • Temperate Deciduous Forest – found in the mid latitudes where the climate is characterized by plentiful rainfall, moderate temperatures, and cool winters. Characterized by trees that lose their leaves after changing colors in the fall.
  • Temperate Coniferous Forest – found in temperate climate zones where the summers are warm and the winters are cool and rainfall is adequate. Evergreens predominate and these forests can be found in coastal areas that experience mild winters and heavy rainfall as well as inland in mountainous areas.
  • Taiga or Boreal Forest – the world’s largest biome is located in the highest northern latitudes where average temperatures and average precipitation are low and are characterized by evergreen coniferous forests.  Animals living in this biome must adapt to very cold temperatures.
  • Tropical Rainforests – found in tropical areas near the equator where the climate is characterized by plentiful rainfall and warm year round temperatures. This biome is home to a great variety of plant and animal life. 

Grasslands

  • Steppes – found in climates that are experience low levels of rainfall, therefore there is an absence of trees. This biome is home to large grazing animals.
  • Savannas – found in climates that experience low levels of rainfall, yet have a little more than steppes and therefore have some trees. Also home to a variety of large animal species.

Deserts

  • Deserts are distinguished by a lack of rainfall, usually less than ten inches per year and can be hot or cold. These climate conditions require the plants and the animals in this biome to adapt to the extreme conditions.

Tundra or Arctic Biome

  • Found almost entirely in the Northern Hemisphere near the Arctic Ocean, it is characterized by low amounts of precipitation and extremely cold temperatures. Permafrost or frozen subsoil makes it difficult to sustain plant life in this biome; therefore this biome lacks trees and is distinguished by small shrubs and low growing plants. These plants have adapted to the colder climate conditions and thrive in the short summer and spring. Animals in this region are few and must adapt to the extreme climate conditions.
NewWG.5 The student understands how political, economic, and social processes shape cultural patterns and characteristics in various places and regions. The student is expected to:
NewWG.5A Analyze how the character of a place is related to its political, economic, social, and cultural elements.

Analyze

HOW THE CHARACTER OF A PLACE IS RELATED TO ITS POLITICAL, ECONOMIC, SOCIAL, AND CULTURAL ELEMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Character of a place refers to the physical and human geographic characteristics that distinguish a particular place. Physical geographic factors such as climate, vegetation, settlement patterns, population density relate to the character of a place as do the political, economic, social and cultural features that make a place unique. Since these features can change over time the character of a place can change over time also.
  • Character of place can be analyzed on a macro level such as examining the character of a culture region or on a micro level, such as examine the character of a city or neighborhood.

 

NewWG.6 The student understands the types, patterns, and processes of settlement. The student is expected to:
NewWG.6A Locate and describe human and physical features that influence the size and distribution of settlements.

Locate, Describe

HUMAN AND PHYSICAL FEATURES THAT INFLUENCE THE SIZE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SETTLEMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Human features that influence settlement patterns may include the availability of economic opportunities, the location of transportation routes, access to housing, opportunities for political participation. Populations tend to settle in areas that provide services, have infrastructure in place and are politically attractive.
  • Physical features greatly influence the habitability of a place. Populations tend to concentrate in regions with favorable climates, where there is access to water and areas that are suitable for agricultural output. Through most of history settlements have concentrated near coastlines and in river valleys. For example the eastern coast of China, or along the coast in Australia.
NewWG.8 The student understands how people, places, and environments are connected and interdependent. The student is expected to:
NewWG.8A Compare ways that humans depend on, adapt to, and modify the physical environment, including the influences of culture and technology.

Compare

WAYS THAT HUMANS DEPEND ON, ADAPT TO, AND MODIFY THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Build dams, windmills, dikes, polders, levees, railroads, bridges, highways, terrace farming
  • Installing solar panels
  • Dredging and irrigation
  • Deforestation, mining, oil extraction, desalination, soil leaching, overgrazing
  • Burning fossil fuels
  • Creating advanced  warning systems for earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes and tsunamis
  • Planting seasonal and/or drought resistant crops  and using fertilizers to increase agricultural output
NewWG.12 The student understands the economic importance of, and issues related to, the location and management of resources. The student is expected to:
NewWG.12A Analyze how the creation, distribution, and management of key natural resources affects the location and patterns of movement of products, money, and people.

Analyze

HOW CREATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND MANAGEMENT OF RESOURCES AFFECT LOCATION AND PATTERNS OF PRODUCTS, MONEY, AND PEOPLE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Discovery of key deposits of natural resources results in migration of people seeking economic opportunities working to extract natural resources. Examples of this include the migration of South Asians to work mines in South Africa, the California Gold Rush, and migrations to oil fields. In order to distribute key resources roads and pipelines are constructed, such as the Interoceanic Highway linking Peruvian ports with Brazil.
  • Demand for arable land can result in the loss of forested areas and cause animal populations in those regions to be pushed out of their habitat.
  • Creation of resources such as the through the use of desalination allows for settlement in regions stricken by a lack of water resources.
  • Analysis may include examination of land redistribution, extraction of minerals and oil, desalinization, cutting of rainforests, and building of infrastructure such as pipelines.
NewWG.12B Evaluate the geographic and economic impact of policies related to the development, use, and scarcity of natural resources such as regulations of water.

Evaluate

GEOGRAPHIC AND ECONOMIC IMPACT OF POLICIES RELATED TO THE USE OF RESOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Geographic impacts of policies related to the development, use, and scarcity of natural resources include loss or preservation of habitats, human development and growth of urban centers, and sustainable use of resources.
  • Policies related to use, scarcity, and development (water): desalination, water recycling, conservation
  • Economic impacts of policies related to the development, use, and scarcity of natural resources include growth or loss in income, creation or loss in jobs, and sustainability of resources for economic use in the future.
  • Management of water resources, particularly in areas of scarcity, can have social, political, economic, and environmental impacts.
NewWG.13 The student understands the spatial characteristics of a variety of global political units. The student is expected to:
NewWG.13A Interpret maps to explain the division of land, including man-made and natural borders, into separate political units such as cities, states, or countries.

Interpret, Explain

MAPS OF POLITICAL DIVISIONS AND UNITS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Physical geographic features such as mountains, rivers, and oceans can create natural borders between political units.
  • Several factors can contribute to the creation of man-made borders. Man-made political borders are generally made following wars to reflect the changes in control of territory. Man-made division may reflect the ethnic divisions within a region, colonial land claims, or the efforts of groups to isolate themselves.
NewWG.14 The student understands the processes that influence political divisions, relationships, and policies. The student is expected to:
NewWG.14A Analyze current events to infer the physical and human processes that lead to the formation of boundaries and other political divisions.

Analyze, Infer

CURRENT EVENTS AND PROCESSES THAT LEAD TO FORMATION OF BOUNDARIES AND DIVISIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Physical processes such as climate change, natural hazards, and plate tectonic movement can lead to the formation of new boundaries. Examples of this are evident in areas where rising sea levels are affecting coastal boundaries.
  • Human processes generally associated with conflict and the resulting treaties have led to the development of new boundaries and political divisions. Examples include the new boundary divisions made following the First World War; the division of Korea and Vietnam following wars in those regions; the creation of boundaries in Africa by colonial leaders; the U.N. partition of Palestine and Israel; and the division of Republic of Sudan and South Sudan following years of conflict and vote for independence in South Sudan. 
NewWG.14C Analyze the human and physical factors that influence control of territories and resources, conflict/war, and international relations of sovereign nations such as China, the United States, Japan, and Russia and international organizations such as the United Nations (UN) and the European Union (EU).

Analyze

FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE POWER, CONFLICT, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • The power to control territory is most dependent on access to resources and the ability to transport resources. The ability to control territory is influenced by a political entity’s capacity to maintain military power, create stable government, and provide economic investment. Additionally, scientific innovation is important for development of new techniques to manage key resources and advance military capabilities. Favorable physical geography facilitates the mobilization of military forces and the transportation of resources, hence why the control of the Panama and Suez canals have been historical issues.
  • Conflicts and war arise from the need to control key natural resources, including access to water and energy sources, such as oil. Inherent in the need to access resources is the need to control territory, so that competing claims to territories leads to conflicts also, such as the conflict in Palestine.  Physical geography serves to isolate and protect some locations and facilitate the mobilization of troops in other places. International organizations such as the United Nations (UN) often serve to mitigate conflicts and respond to war.
  • The need to share resources has impacted international relationships, including creating trade agreements between nation-states such as free trade agreements, creating cartels such as the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and facilitating the creation of the European Union (EU).
NewWG.16 The student understands how the components of culture affect the way people live and shape the characteristics of regions. The student is expected to:
NewWG.16A Describe distinctive cultural patterns and landscapes associated with different places in Texas, the United States, and other regions of the world and how these patterns influenced the processes of innovation and diffusion.

Describe

CULTURAL PATTERNS AND HOW PATTERNS INFLUENCED THE PROCESSES OF INNOVATION AND DIFFUSION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Cultural landscape refers to the modification of a place by people and includes what humans have planted, built and modified in the physical landscape.  
  • Cultural patterns refer to the distribution and characteristics of the beliefs, values, attitudes, norms, and customs in a region.
  • Distinctive cultural patterns of Texas, the United States, and other regions of the world include cultural landscapes of agriculture versus urban centers, and reflect varying belief systems and values of cultures.
  • Cultural landscapes and cultural patterns are influenced by the processes of innovation and diffusion. An example of this is the predominance of fast food restaurants around the globe that have created a common cultural landscape.
NewWG.16B Describe elements of culture, including language, religion, beliefs, institutions, and technologies.

Describe

ELEMENTS OF CULTURE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Culture refers to the attitudes, values, knowledge and behaviors shared by a particular group which are taught to successive generations. All cultural groups are distinguished by their language, religion, beliefs, institutions and technologies.
NewWG.17 The student understands the distribution, patterns, and characteristics of different cultures. The student is expected to:
NewWG.17B Describe central ideas and spatial distribution of major religious traditions, including Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and Sikhism.

Describe

MAJOR WORLD RELIGIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Buddhism – based on the central idea that pain and suffering is brought about by desire and that to reach a state of nirvana or release from pain and suffering may take multiple lifetimes; predominantly practiced in South Asia, East Asia, and Southeast Asia
  • Christianity – based on belief in one God and the central idea that salvation can be achieved by following the teachings of Jesus; predominantly practiced in Europe, North America, and South America
  • Hinduism – based on the central idea of reincarnation in which one’s social class is determined by actions taken in a previous life; predominantly practiced in South Asia
  • Islam – based on the central idea that one’s life must be lived in submission to God based on messages from the Prophet Muhammad; predominantly practiced in North Africa, Southwest Asia, Pakistan and Indonesia
  • Judaism – based on the central idea that there is one God and that one must live according to the sacred Hebrew texts; predominantly practiced in Europe, Israel, and North America
  • Sikhism – based on the central idea that there is one God and to seek oneness with God involves practicing meditation, service, and social justice; predominantly practiced in South Asia
NewWG.18 The student understands the ways in which cultures change and maintain continuity. The student is expected to:
NewWG.18B Assess causes and effects of conflicts between groups of people, including modern genocides and terrorism.

Assess

CAUSES, EFFECTS, AND PERCEPTIONS OF CONFLICTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Conflicts between groups generally occur when there is a disparity in access to resources and/ or a disparity in political power between groups.  Ethnic and cultural differences serve to differentiate the oppressed and the oppressors.
  • Effects from conflicts between groups can result in genocide, ethnic cleansing, acts of terrorism, emergence of new cultural patterns such as  with colonization in Latin America, lingering animosities, and codified segregation such as apartheid in South Africa
  • Perceptions of conflicts between groups of people can be influenced by propaganda, media reports, and one’s cultural beliefs.
NewWG.19 The student understands the impact of technology and human modifications on the physical environment. The student is expected to:
NewWG.19B Analyze the ways technological innovations such as air conditioning and desalinization have allowed humans to adapt to places.

Analyze

WAYS TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS HAVE ALLOWED HUMANS TO ADAPT TO PLACES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Air conditioning has allowed growth of urban centers in areas of extreme heat.
  • Desalinization provides clean drinking water in areas with scarce freshwater resources.
NewWG.19C Analyze the environmental, economic, and social impacts of advances in technology on agriculture and natural resources.

Analyze

IMPACTS OF ADVANCES IN TECHNOLOGY ON AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Increase in the usage of pesticides, fertilizers, and genetically modified seeds (Green Revolution)
  • Deforestation to create larger commercial farms
  • Increased food production
  • Farming in arid climates leading to irrigation
  • Healthier soils with organic farming
  • Access to previously unattainable natural resources through scientific advances
  • Possible pollution of some physical landscapes
  • Increased air and water pollution
  • Increased mechanization requiring fewer workers
  • Migration of unemployed workers to urban areas
  • Erosion of traditional economies
NewWG.21 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewWG.21C Create and interpret different types of maps to answer geographic questions, infer relationships, and analyze change.

Create, Interpret

TYPES OF MAPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Examples of types of maps: physical, topographical, political, climate, population, economic, cultural trait (e.g., religion), road
  • Examples of types of map projections: Mercator, Robinson, Mollweide, broken equal area (interrupted), polar
  • Use maps to
    • Answer geographic questions
    • Infer relationships
    • Analyze change
NewWG.21D Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, drawing inferences and conclusions, and developing connections over time.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
  • Developing connections over time involves the examination of how political, economic, social, and geographic factors have change over time or how those factors have remained the same over time.
NewWG.22 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
NewWG.22A Create appropriate graphics such as maps, diagrams, tables, and graphs to communicate geographic features, distributions, and relationships.

Design, Draw

APPROPRIATE GRAPHICS TO COMMUNICATE GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES, DISTRIBUTIONS, AND RELATIONSHIPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Maps
  • Diagrams
  • Tables
  • Graphs
NewWG.22B Generate summaries, generalizations, and thesis statements supported by evidence.

Generate

SUMMARIES, GENERALIZATIONS, AND THESIS STATEMENTS SUPPORTED BY EVIDENCE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Summaries are a concise version of information.
  • Generalizations are broad statements based on the evidence presented by patterns.
  • Thesis statement refers to main claim or argument made in an essay.
NewWG.22C Use social studies terminology correctly.

Use

GEOGRAPHIC TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY

NewWG.22D Create original work using effective written communication skills, including proper citations and understanding and avoiding plagiarism.

Create

ORIGINAL WORK

Use

EFFECTIVE WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Correct grammar and punctuation
  • Accurate spelling
  • Clear diction and sentence structure
  • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
DEVELOPING TEKS

TEKS that need continued practice, improvement, and refinement, but do not necessarily need to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
NewWG.21 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewWG.21A Analyze and evaluate the validity and utility of multiple sources of geographic information such as primary and secondary sources, aerial photographs, and maps.

Analyze, Evaluate

VALIDITY AND UTILITY OF MULTIPLE SOURCES OF GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Primary sources
  • Secondary sources
  • Aerial photographs
  • Maps
NewWG.21B Identify places of contemporary geopolitical significance on a map.

Locate

PLACES OF CONTEMPORARY GEOPOLITICAL SIGNIFICANCE ON A MAP

NewWG.21E Identify different points of view about an issue or current topic.

Identify

POINTS OF VIEW

Including, but not limited to:

  • Point of view refers to the perspective, claim, or attitude an author expresses in a document.
NewWG.23 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
NewWG.23A Plan, organize, and complete a research project that involves asking geographic questions; acquiring, organizing, and analyzing information; answering questions; and communicating results.

Plan, Organize, Complete

RESEARCH PROJECT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Asking geographic questions
  • Acquiring, organizing, and analyzing information
  • Answering questions
  • Communicating results
NewWG.23B Use case studies and GIS to identify contemporary challenges and to answer real-world questions.

Use

CASE STUDIES AND GIS

Identify

CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES

Answer

REAL-WORLD QUESTIONS

NewWG.23C Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
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ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/19/2019
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