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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 2 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 02: Civic Pride in Our Community SUGGESTED DURATION : 20 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address citizenship in a community. Citizens generally take pride in their communities, which is reflected in the contributions they make to the community and in many of the traditions practiced in the community. While students have been participating in the Pledge of Allegiance since starting school, it is in this unit that they study about how this practice reflects a pride in America. Additionally students should examine what the pledge means to deepen their understanding of why this tradition is important to Americans.  An examination of how citizens show pride in the community is important for the development of active citizens.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, student studied about the history of the community and about how that history is reflected in the community’s celebrations and landmarks. In Kindergarten and Grade 1 students learned about the importance of traditional celebrations, customs and holidays in America.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about how good citizens contribute to the community and how citizens exhibit civic pride in the community. Additionally, students continue to practice their spatial skills by creating maps related to the community.

After this Unit

In the next unit student study about how communities are governed.


Citizenship has responsibilities.

  • What make a good citizen?

Civically engaged citizens take informed action to improve the quality of life in the community.

  • What are the ways to effectively bring about change?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Good citizens make contributions to the community in many different ways.

  • What are the characteristics of a good citizen?
  • Who are some historical figures that have exemplified good citizenship?
  • What are some ways that good citizens contribute to their communities?

Civic Engagement

  • Citizenship
  • Rights/Responsibilities
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

A citizen’s civic pride is shown by pledging to the flag, displaying patriotic symbols, and singing patriot songs.

  • What do the words of the Texas and American pledges of allegiances mean to citizens?
  • Why is it important to recite the Pledge of Allegiance?
  • What state and national symbols are important to Texans and Americans?
  • What patriot songs do American’s know?

Civic Engagement

  • Citizenship

Cultural Patterns

  • Customs/Traditions
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None identified

Unit Vocabulary

citizen – a member of a community, state, or nation who respects the rules of the community
justice – acting with fairness to others
civic pride – a spirit of caring for your community 
customs – a habit that is common to a group or a place

Related Vocabulary

  • community
  • historical figures
  • pledge
  • monument
 
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
2 Geography.
2.5 Geography. The student uses simple geographic tools such as maps and globes. The student is expected to:
2.5A Interpret information on maps and globes using basic map elements such as title, orientation (north, south, east, west), and legend/map keys.

Interpret

MAPS AND GLOBES USING MAP ELEMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Title
  • Orientation (cardinal directions: north, south, east, west)
  • Legend/map key
  • Symbols(symbols depend on map’s theme)
2.5B Create maps to show places and routes within the home, school, and community.

Create

MAPS TO SHOW PLACES AND ROUTES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Map of home
  • School map – map to various school locations
  • Community map – map to various community locations
  • Possible examples:
    • Map from one student’s house to another
    • Map to historical landmark
    • Map of historical interest
    • Map from school to home
    • Map of escape route for a fire drill at home and school
2 Citizenship.
2.13 Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historical figures and other individuals. The student is expected to:
2.13A Identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully holding public officials to their word, and voting.

Identify

CHARACTERISTICS OF GOOD CITIZENSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Truthfulness
  • Justice
  • Equality
  • Respect for oneself and others
  • Responsibility in daily life
  • Participation in government
    • Educating oneself about the issues
    • Respectfully holding public officials to their word
    • Voting
2.13B Identify historical figures such as Paul Revere, Abigail Adams, World War II Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs) and Navajo Code Talkers, and Sojourner Truth who have exemplified good citizenship.

Identify

HISTORICAL FIGURES WHO HAVE EXEMPLIFIED GOOD CITIZENSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Paul Revere (1735-1818) – exemplified good citizenship by being a courier for the Massachusetts Committee of Correspondence (stayed informed on issues); risked his life by delivering warning of the British troop movements (responsibility in daily life, acting in the common good)
  • Abigail Adams (1744-1818) – exemplified good citizenship by staying informed about issues and speaking out for what she believed. She also held elected officials to their word (as evidenced by her correspondence with John Adams). She was an advocate for women’s property rights and the pursuit of an education.
  • Women’s Airforce Service Pilots of the Second World War (1942-1944) – exemplified good citizenship by working as pilots trained to fly U.S. military aircraft with the mission of flying planes from factories to embarkation airports for duty
  • Navajo Code Talkers of the Second World War – exemplified good citizenship by risking their lives in order to help the U.S. military develop unbreakable codes while fighting in the Pacific Theater.
  • Sojourner Truth (circa 1757-1883) – African American woman abolitionist and supporter of the women's rights movement (characteristics exhibited: justice, equality, respect for oneself and others, responsibility in daily life); exemplified good citizenship by advocating desegregation, supporting women’s rights, and by helping freed enslaved people adjust and find jobs and housing.
2.13C Identify other individuals who exemplify good citizenship.

Identify

OTHER INDIVIDUALS WHO EXEMPLIFY GOOD CITIZENSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Local good citizens (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
  • Namesakes of local schools, parks, streets, and buildings (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
  • Other examples:
    • Teachers (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
    • Student leaders (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
    • Grandparents, parents (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
    • First responders (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
    • Athletes, celebrities (and how they exemplify good citizenship)
2.13D Identify ways to actively practice good citizenship, including involvement in community service.

Identify

WAYS TO ACTIVELY PRACTICE GOOD CITIZENSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Involvement in community service
  • Volunteering with civic organizations
  • Watching out for neighbors’ property
2.14 Citizenship. The student identifies customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles that contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:
2.14A Recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag and the Pledge to the Texas Flag.

Recite

PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Pledge to the U.S. Flag
    • “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands; one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” (Last amended in 1954.)
  • Pledge to the Texas Flag
    • “Honor the Texas flag. I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible.” (Last amended in 2007)
2.14B Identify selected patriotic songs, including "The Star Spangled Banner" and "America the Beautiful".

Identify

PATRIOTIC SONGS

Including, but not limited to:

  • The Star Spangled Banner – national anthem of the United States
  • America the Beautiful – popular song originally from the late 19th century; numerous versions with multiple verses; recorded by various popular singers
2.14C Identify selected symbols such as state and national birds and flowers and patriotic symbols such as the U.S. and Texas flags and Uncle Sam.

Identify

SYMBOLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • State and national birds and flowers
    • U.S. – bald eagle (bird), rose (flower)
    • Texas – mockingbird (bird), bluebonnet (flower)
  • Patriotic symbols
    • U.S. flag – white signifies purity and innocence; red signifies valor and bravery; blue signifies vigilance, perseverance, and justice; stripes for original colonies; stars for states.
    • Texas flag – white-purity, blue-loyalty, red-bravery, Lone Star Flag for both the Republic of Texas and the State of Texas
    • Uncle Sam – personification of the United States and nickname for U.S. (1812)
  • Other symbols
    • State
      • Tree – pecan
      • Star – Lone Star State
      • Many others state symbols are named, from state fiber (cotton) to the state gem (blue topaz) to the state dinosaur (the sauropod Paluxysaurus jonesi).
    • Nation
      • Tree – oak
      • Statue of Liberty
      • Liberty Bell
      • Red, white, and blue
2.14D Identify how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an American love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.

Identify

HOW CUSTOMS, SYMBOLS, AND CELEBRATIONS REFLECT OUR NATIONAL IDENTITY

Including, but not limited to:

  • National identity – the defining criteria and shared heritage that distinguishes a group of people as a nationality. In the United States, components of national identity include a love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.
  • Customs build a shared heritage.
    • Thanksgiving Day – generally celebrated with religious services and family gatherings
    • Independence Day with parades and fireworks
    • Singing patriotic songs
    • Starting meetings, sporting events, and the school day with presentation of the flag and “Pledge of Allegiance”
    • Standing for the U.S. flag at the beginning of parades, at sporting events, etc.
  • Symbols serve as a physical reminder of American values.
    • Examples may include: U.S. Flag, Liberty Bell, Uncle Sam, Mt. Rushmore, Statue of Liberty
  • Celebrations provide opportunities to honor those who promote and protect American values.
    • National celebrations include Constitution Day, Independence Day, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, etc.
    • The achievements of significance individuals are celebrated with special awards such as the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Medal of Honor, and various other military awards
2 Social studies skills.
2.19 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
2.19B Create written and visual material such as stories, poems, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL TO EXPRESS IDEAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Stories
  • Poems
  • Maps
  • Graphic organizers
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/23/2018
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