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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 2 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 01: Honoring Our Community History SUGGESTED DURATION : 20 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

In Grade 2, students focus on a study of the local community by examining how historians study the past, the behavior of citizens in a community, how communities are governed, how community members interact with the environment, the economics of communities, and the culture of communities.  

This unit bundles student expectations that address how historians study the past and the importance of history in a community. Historians analyze documents and artifacts to interpret the cause and effect, and the significance of past events along with the changes brought about by past events. History at its core is a study about changes. Historians seek to answer not only what happened, but what changes occurred because of the events. To facilitate their work, historians identify significant dates and organize events into periods of time or eras. An era is marked by similar political, economic, and social conditions. This introductory unit is intended to introduce students to the historian’s craft as well as to learn about how communities honor the past.  Learning about how historians examine the past is important for understanding how history impacts the current world we live in.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, in Kindergarten and Grade 1 students learned about chronological order and about the contributions of significant historical leaders who have shaped the community, as public figures, historical political leaders, and scientists as a feature of studying history.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about using sources to study the past, about how individuals in the past shaped communities to be what they are today, and about how communities use celebrations and landmarks to honor the past. During this unit students also practice their spatial reasoning skills by creating maps, such as those showing the location of significant local, state, and national landmarks.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students study about being citizens in a community.


Historical inquiry is a continuous process of analyzing multiple sources and reconciling multiple points of view in order to construct a tentative interpretation of the past.

  • What methods are used to craft a narrative of the past?

Culture serves to unify people.

  • What commonalities binds people together as a group
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Historians look at many sources to study about communities in the past.

  • What is chronology?
  • How is a timeline created and used?
  • What types of sources do historians study?
  • What kind of information do historians get from documents, pictures, and interviews?

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Individuals have shaped communities in the past and shape communities today.

  • What are some ways that people have contributed to their communities in the past?
  • How have people used inventiveness to contribute to their communities?
  • What are some ways people contribute to their communities today?

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity
  • Ideas/Innovation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Communities honor the past by participating in celebrations and building landmarks.

  • What celebrations are common in Texas?
  • What celebrations are common in America?
  • What celebrations are common in the local community?
  • What types of landmarks are there in the United States, in Texas, and in the local community?
  • How do Americans honor the ideas of freedom, individualism, and inventiveness?

Cultural Patterns

  • Community
  • Customs/Traditions
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None identified

Unit Vocabulary

history – a study of how people and events in the past changed communities
community – a group of people who share a common bond of working, living, or interacting together 
chronology – placing events in order by time
inventiveness – using your skills and imagination to create things that help solve problems
symbol – an object that represents something else

Related Vocabulary

  • history
  • historians
  • historical figures
  • landmark
  • celebrations
 
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
2 History.
2.1 History. The student understands the historical significance of landmarks and celebrations in the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:
2.1A Explain the significance of various community, state, and national celebrations such as Veterans Day, Memorial Day, Independence Day, and Thanksgiving.

Explain

HISTORICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF CELEBRATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Veterans Day – honors military veterans and citizens who have served in the military. Nationally observed on November 11. Originally commemorated the cessation of fighting during the First World War – the armistice went into effect on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month (November 11, 1918 at 11:00 am.) Later expanded to recognize all veterans of foreign wars and then all veterans.
  • Memorial Day – (formerly Decoration Day) commemoration for soldiers who died in war. Always on the last Monday in May.
  • Independence Day – commemorates the signing of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. National holiday first celebrated in 1777.
  • Thanksgiving –national holiday for giving thanks, first made official during the Civil War in 1863, commonly traced to celebrations of Plymouth settlers during the 1600s; the holiday is associated with a variety of traditions such as feasts, religious services, family gathering; celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November.
  • Local celebrations
  • Celebrations unite communities through shared experiences.
2.1B Identify and explain the significance of various community, state, and national landmarks such as monuments and government buildings.

Identify, Explain

SIGNIFICANCE OF LANDMARKS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Monuments
    • Community – statues, parks, bridges, cemeteries, and historic locations
    • State – San Jacinto, The Alamo, Kennedy Memorial Plaza
    • Nation – WW II Navajo Code Talker Monument, WASP memorial at Avenger Field, Sweetwater, TX, The Boston Women’s Memorial (featuring Abigail Adams), Statue of Liberty, Washington Monument, Mount Rushmore
  • Government buildings
    • Community – county courthouse, city hall
    • State – capitol building
    • Nation – U.S. Capitol building, White House, U.S. Supreme Court

Monument – a structure designed to have a lasting tribute to a significant person, place, or event.

2.2 History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
2.2A Describe the order of events by using designations of time periods such as historical and present times.

Describe

CHRONOLOGY USING TERMS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Historical times
  • Present times
2.2B Apply vocabulary related to chronology, including past, present, and future.

Apply

VOCABULARY RELATED TO CHRONOLOGY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Past – having existed or occurred in an earlier time
  • Present – now
  • Future – something that will happen in time to come
2.2C Create and interpret timelines for events in the past and present.

Create, Interpret

TIMELINES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Historical events
  • Present event
  • Events in the history of the local community
  • Events in the history of the school

Timeline – chronological listing of events. Arranging events in order can help clarify the sequence in which events occurred, and can indicate cause-and-effect relationships.

2.3 History. The student understands how various sources provide information about the past and present. The student is expected to:
2.3A Identify several sources of information about a given period or event such as reference materials, biographies, newspapers, and electronic sources.

Identify

SOURCES OF INFORMATION ABOUT PERIODS OR EVENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Reference materials (e.g., encyclopedias, dictionaries, almanacs, directories)
  • Biographies – an account of the life of an individual
  • Newspapers – major Texas papers such as Houston Chronicle, Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Star-Telegram, San Antonio Express-News, Austin-American Statesman, El Paso Times, Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, The Galveston County Daily News
  • Electronic sources – databases of primary sources such as the Library of Congress and National Archives
2.3B Describe various evidence of the same time period using primary sources such as photographs, journals, and interviews.

Describe

EVIDENCE OF SAME TIME PERIOD USING DIFFERENT SOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Photographs
  • Journals
  • Interviews
2.4 History. The student understands how historical figures, patriots, and good citizens helped shape the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:
2.4B Identify historical figures such as Amelia Earhart, W. E. B. DuBois, Robert Fulton, and George Washington Carver who have exhibited individualism and inventiveness.

Identify

HISTORIC FIGURES WHO EXHIBITED INDIVIDUALISM AND INVENTIVENESS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Amelia Earhart (1897-1937) – female pilot who disappeared during an attempt to fly around the world. Earhart inspired women during the 1930’s by role-modeling a spirit exploration. She was the first female pilot to fly across the Atlantic Ocean.
  • W.E.B. DuBois (1868-1963) – first African American graduate of Harvard earning a doctorate degree in history; writer, lifelong educator, and college professor; a leader of National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). A civil rights activist and a great proponent of education for African American people. Also advocated for women’s rights.
  • Robert Fulton (1765-1815) – inventor of the first commercially successful steamboat in the United States. When confronted with many obstacles, such as the lack of funding for his project and encouragement, he persevered. Built the first commercial steamboat Clermont; steamboats eventually became a leading method of travel and transporting goods during the nineteenth century.
  • George Washington Carver (1864-1943) – scientist, believed to have been born into slavery in 1864; innovator in new methods of crop rotation and the conservation of nutrients in the soil. Developed hundreds of ways to utilize peanuts so that the demand would increase and thus help the southern economy. Through vast experiments, he found a way to help southern agriculture by encouraging farmers to plant crops that were alternatives to cotton. The various types of peanuts would restore nutrients in the soil that had been depleted due to cotton, as well as be a source of food. The sale of peanut related products brought economic growth.
2.4C Explain how people and events have influenced local community history.

Explain

HOW LOCAL PEOPLE AND EVENTS INFLUENCE COMMUNITY HISTORY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Local people who influenced community
  • Local events that influenced community
2.5 Geography. The student uses simple geographic tools such as maps and globes. The student is expected to:
2.5A Interpret information on maps and globes using basic map elements such as title, orientation (north, south, east, west), and legend/map keys.

Interpret

MAPS AND GLOBES USING MAP ELEMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Title
  • Orientation (cardinal directions: north, south, east, west)
  • Legend/map key
  • Symbols(symbols depend on map’s theme)
2.5B Create maps to show places and routes within the home, school, and community.

Create

MAPS TO SHOW PLACES AND ROUTES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Map of home
  • School map – map to various school locations
  • Community map – map to various community locations
  • Possible examples:
    • Map from one student’s house to another
    • Map to historical landmark
    • Map of historical interest
    • Map from school to home
    • Map of escape route for a fire drill at home and school
2 Citizenship.
2.14 Citizenship. The student identifies customs, symbols, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles that contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:
2.14D Identify how selected customs, symbols, and celebrations reflect an American love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.

Identify

HOW CUSTOMS, SYMBOLS, AND CELEBRATIONS REFLECT OUR NATIONAL IDENTITY

Including, but not limited to:

  • National identity – the defining criteria and shared heritage that distinguishes a group of people as a nationality. In the United States, components of national identity include a love of individualism, inventiveness, and freedom.
  • Customs build a shared heritage.
    • Thanksgiving Day – generally celebrated with religious services and family gatherings
    • Independence Day with parades and fireworks
    • Singing patriotic songs
    • Starting meetings, sporting events, and the school day with presentation of the flag and “Pledge of Allegiance”
    • Standing for the U.S. flag at the beginning of parades, at sporting events, etc.
  • Symbols serve as a physical reminder of American values.
    • Examples may include: U.S. Flag, Liberty Bell, Uncle Sam, Mt. Rushmore, Statue of Liberty
  • Celebrations provide opportunities to honor those who promote and protect American values.
    • National celebrations include Constitution Day, Independence Day, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, etc.
    • The achievements of significance individuals are celebrated with special awards such as the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the Congressional Medal of Honor, and various other military awards
2 Social studies skills.
2.18 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
2.18C Use various parts of a source, including the table of contents, glossary, and index, as well as keyword Internet searches to locate information.

Use

PARTS OF A SOURCE TO LOCATE INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Table of Contents
  • Glossary
  • Index
  • Keyword Internet search
2.19 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
2.19A Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences.

Express

IDEAS ORALLY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Based on knowledge
  • Based on experiences
2.19B Create written and visual material such as stories, poems, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL TO EXPRESS IDEAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Stories
  • Poems
  • Maps
  • Graphic organizers
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/23/2018
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