Hello, Guest!

Instructional Focus Document
Grade 1 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 04: Studying the Past SUGGESTED DURATION : 20 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address the contributions made by historical figures as citizens. Examining the contributions of historical figures provides students with a foundational understanding of how history is about changes.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students practiced developing spatial reasoning skills by studying about using maps and globes.  In Kindergarten students were introduced to the concept of chronology and historical figures.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about the concept of chronology and why it is important in studying the past, as well learning about the contributions of significant historical American political leaders and scientists.

After this Unit

In the next unit the importance of celebrations, symbols and cultural heritage to a community.


History is organized into periods of time based on patterns of change and continuity.

  • How is periodization a tool for studying history?

Historians use interpretations of the past to determine change and continuity of political, economic, and social patterns as well as to infer cause-effect relationships.

  • What is the task of the historian?

Historians, geographers, and social scientists conduct research by creating compelling questions; evaluating sources; gathering, analyzing, and synthesizing information; and communicating conclusions supported by evidence.

  • How do historians, geographers, and social scientists conduct credible research?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Historians study the past to see changes.

  • What is the difference between the past, the present, and the future?
  • How are calendars and timelines similar and different?

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Historians study about how significant individuals change their communities by being inventive.

  • What are some contributions that have been made by significant political leaders in the United States?
  • What are some contributions that have been made by significant American scientists?
  • How have different technologies changed communities?

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity

Scientific/Technological Patterns

  • Mechanization
  • Communication
  • Transportation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None Identified

Unit Vocabulary

timeline – a graphic showing the chronology of events
technology – tools and inventions that make a task or job easier to do
historian – a person who studies about the changes made by events and people in the past
inventiveness – using your skills and imagination to create things that help solve problems
individualism – the idea that people can do things independently of others in the community

Related Vocabulary

  • community
  • historical figure
  • history
  • chronology
  • calendar
 
System Resources

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
1 History.
1.2 History. The student understands how historical figures, patriots, and good citizens helped shape the community, state, and nation. The student is expected to:
1.2A Identify contributions of historical figures, including Sam Houston, George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, and Martin Luther King Jr., who have influenced the community, state, and nation.

Identify

CONTRIBUTIONS OF HISTORICAL FIGURES WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE COMMUNITY, STATE, AND NATION

Including, but not limited to:

Community

  • Varies based on the local community, teachers should consider examples of individuals who have schools in the community named in their honor

State

  • Sam Houston – military leader who played a crucial role in the Battle of San Jacinto by defeating Mexico and thus acquire independence for Texas. Served as first president of the Republic of Texas. U.S. Senator from Texas after Texas joined the United States. Also served as Governor of Texas and influenced legislation at the state and national level.

Nation

  • George Washington – served as commander of the Continental Army in the American Revolution. Modeled great civic virtue serving as first President of the United States.
  • Abraham Lincoln – President of the United States during the Civil War, preserving the Union and freeing enslaved people in slavery states with the Emancipation Proclamation.
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. – led a national movement to establish equal rights for African Americans. Remembered for his peaceful and non-violent demonstrations in a quest for racial equality in American society.
1.2B Identify historical figures such as Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Garrett Morgan, and Richard Allen, and other individuals who have exhibited individualism and inventiveness.

Identify

HISTORICAL FIGURES WHO HAVE EXHIBITED INDIVIDUALISM AND INVENTIVENESS

Including, but not limited to:

Individualism

  • Richard Allen – African-American minister, abolitionist, and advocate for the African American community; born into slavery and then worked to buy his freedom; self-educated, he entered ministry with the Methodist Church in North America at its founding in 1784; he eventually led an all-African American congregation and founded the African Methodist Episcopal Church denomination in 1816; his church was a station along the Underground Railroad for escaped enslaved people

Inventiveness

  • Alexander Graham Bell – Inventor of the telephone (1876 patent). His mother and his wife, both of whom were deaf, inspired his research on hearing and speech. Led to the development of the telephone, as well as many techniques for teaching the deaf. Founded the Bell Telephone Company. Held 18 patents of his own and 12 with collaborators, including improvements to the phonograph.
  • Thomas Edison – Primarily known for his invention of the incandescent electric light bulb which soon replaced gaslight. Holder of more than 1,000 patents, many related to mass communications and telecommunications. He also invented the motion picture camera and phonograph, a stock ticker, a mechanical vote recorder, a battery for an electric car, recorded music. Originated the concept and implementation of electric-power generation and distribution systems that delivered electricity to homes and businesses, forming Edison General Electric in 1890.
  • Garrett Morgan – Inventor and businessman who invented many safety and lifesaving devices, including a gas mask and smoke protector, as well as one of the first U.S. patents for a traffic signal (1923, Cincinnati). He used his gas mask to rescue 32 men trapped during an explosion in a tunnel 250 feet below Lake Erie. His Safety Hood and Smoke Protector won a gold medal from the International Association of Fire Chiefs. Son of former enslaved people, born in 1877.
  • Other individuals
1.2C Compare the similarities and differences among the lives and activities of historical figures and other individuals who have influenced the community, state, and nation.

Compare

SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES AMONG HISTORICAL FIGURES AND OTHER INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE INFLUENCED THE COMMUNITY STATE AND NATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Comparison of daily lives of historical figures, such as living a rural lifestyle compared to urban, living life in wealth or in poverty.
  • Comparison of the time in which the historical figures lived, such as during the American Revolution as compared to twentieth century.
  • Comparison of the changes the contributions the historical figure made as political, economic, social, or scientific.
1.3 History. The student understands the concepts of time and chronology. The student is expected to:
1.3A Distinguish among past, present, and future.

Distinguish among

CONCEPTS OF TIME

Including, but not limited to:

  • Past
  • Present
  • Future
  • Yesterday, today, tomorrow
  • Before, now, after, next
1.3B Describe and measure calendar time by days, weeks, months, and years.

Describe, Measure

CALENDAR TIME

Including, but not limited to:

  • Days
  • Weeks
  • Months
  • Years
1.3C Create a calendar and simple timeline.

Create

CALENDAR AND TIMELINE

1 Science, technology, and society.
1.16 Science, technology, and society. The student understands how technology affects daily life, past and present. The student is expected to:
1.16A Describe how technology changes the ways families live.

Describe

HOW TECHNOLOGY CHANGES THE WAY FAMILIES LIVE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Technology – application of processes, methods, or knowledge to achieve a specific purpose
    • Less time spent on task (e.g., preparing food, doing laundry)
    • Less energy required from the individual
    • Use of timers provides services without humans present (e.g., sprinklers on lawn, recording television shows)
    • More comfort (e.g., air conditioner, remote control)
1.16B Describe how technology changes communication, transportation, and recreation.

Describe

HOW TECHNOLOGY CHANGES COMMUNICATION, TRANSPORTATION, RECREATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Communication technology has allowed for faster communication across larger spaces. Communication technology in modern times has evolved from via telegraph to telephone lines to satellite.
  • Transportation technology has allowed for quicker movement of goods and people. Transportation technology in modern times includes the use of railroads, automobiles, and airplanes.  Energy used to fuel transportation continues to be developed along with technology to produce eco-friendly forms of transportation.
  • The development of many labor saving devices, along with faster transportation and communication have freed up time previously spent on laborious task. This provided for the development of more recreational time in societies.  Additionally technologies associated with computer gaming have provided new recreational opportunities.
1 Social studies skills.
1.17 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
1.17C Sequence and categorize information.

Sequence, Categorize

INFORMATION

1.18 Social studies skills. The student communicates in oral, visual, and written forms. The student is expected to:
1.18A Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences.

Express

IDEAS ORALLY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Based on knowledge
  • Based on experiences
1.18B Create and interpret visual and written material.

Create, Interpret

MATERIALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Visual, written material
    • Pictures
    • Symbols
    • Electronic media
    • Maps
    • Artifacts
    • Graphs
    • Timelines
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/23/2018
Loading
Data is Loading...