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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 1 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 05: Remembering Traditions SUGGESTED DURATION : 20 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that emphasize the importance of cultural traditions in communities. Studying about traditional celebrations and customs is important for understanding the common values shared by Americans.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, about the use of chronology in historical study and about the contributions of historical political leaders and scientists in America. In Kindergarten students studied about community traditions, celebrations and customs in the context of patriotic celebrations, community celebrations and family traditions.

During this Unit

During this unit, student study about important American celebrations and holidays, about symbols, mottos and anthems which are important to Americans and about family and community traditions.

After this Unit

In the next unit student learn about goods and services and about how scarcity forces people to make economic choices.


Culture serves to unify people.

  • What commonalities binds people together as a group?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Americans honor important people and events with celebrations and holidays.

  • What are some of the important holidays celebrated by Americans?
  • What are some of the ways Americans celebrate important holidays?
  • Why do communities have important holidays?

Cultural Patterns

  • Community
  • Customs/Traditions
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Symbols, anthems, and mottoes represent important beliefs and ideas.

  • What are some of the symbols, anthems and mottoes that are important to Americans?
  • Why are symbols, anthems, and mottoes important to communities?
  • Why is pledging allegiance to the flag important to Americans?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Family and community traditions and customs reflect cultural heritage.

  • What are some important traditions and customs practiced in the community?
  • Why do families and communities have traditions?
  • How do folktales and legends reflect the cultural heritage of a community?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Though many people believe that the motto of the United States is E pluribus unum (out of many, one), the official motto of the country is “In God We Trust,” which was adopted in 1956.

Unit Vocabulary

tradition – practices and beliefs that are taught to younger people
custom – a habit that is common to a group or a place
symbol – an object that represents something else
anthem – a song that shows patriotism or dedication
motto – an expression of an important idea or belief
cultural heritage – a way of life passed from older people to younger people in a community

Related Vocabulary

  • community
  • history
  • celebration
  • pledge
  • folktales
  • legends
 
System Resources

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
1 History.
1.1 History. The student understands the origins of customs, holidays, and celebrations. The student is expected to:
1.1A Describe the origins of customs, holidays, and celebrations of the community, state, and nation such as San Jacinto Day, Independence Day, and Veterans Day.

Describe

ORIGINS OF CUSTOMS, HOLIDAYS, AND CELEBRATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Customs – ways of doing things within a group which after being practiced for a long time become habit.
  • Celebrations – actions or events to honor a significant day, individual, event, or other circumstance  with ceremonies of respect, joy, or festivity 
  • Holiday – a day in commemoration of a significant day, individual, event, or other circumstance

Community

  • Varies from community to community

State

  • San Jacinto Day (April 21)  commemorates the end of the Texas Revolution when Texans led by Sam Houston defeated Mexican President, General Santa Anna at the battle of San Jacinto (April 21, 1836); is celebrated with annual reenactments

Nation

  • Independence Day (July 4) commemorates the signing of the Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776). Made an official holiday in 1783, the year the War for Independence (American Revolution) ended. Made a federal holiday in 1941. Customarily celebrated with fireworks, picnics, parades, “1812 Overture” during fireworks display.
  • Veterans’ Day (November 11) honors veterans who have served in the military defending the United States. Originally called Armistice Day, to commemorate the Armistice to temporarily halt hostilities of World War I signed the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, 1918 - November 11, 1918.Expanded to include all veterans and made official in 1978. Commemorated with ceremonies at cemeteries, patriotic parades, laying of a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.
1.1B Compare the observance of holidays and celebrations, past and present.

Compare

OBSERVANCES PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • San Jacinto Day
    • Past: Celebrations of victory for Texas sovereignty
    • Present: Reenactments and other festivities
  • Independence Day
    • Past: Picnics, fireworks displays, and parades
    • Present: Fireworks display, parades, etc.
  • Veterans Day
    • Past: Armistice Day in celebration of the end of WWI
    • Present: Celebrates all Veterans
  • Constitution Day
    • Past: Beginning in 2005, schools receiving federal funds were mandated by Congress to observe Constitution Day on September 17.
    • Present: National celebration and implementation of lesson plans with interactive websites and access to the national archives primary resources.
1 Citizenship.
1.14 Citizenship. The student understands important symbols, customs, and celebrations that represent American beliefs and principles and contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:
1.14A Explain state and national patriotic symbols, including the United States and Texas flags, the Liberty Bell, the Statue of Liberty, and the Alamo.

Explain

STATE AND NATIONAL PATRIOTIC SYMBOLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • State patriotic symbols
    • Texas flag – adopted by the Republic of Texas in 1839; the colors symbolize courage (red), purity (white), and loyalty (blue), as with the U.S. flag; the 16th Legislature revised civil statues in 1879 but failed to include an official state flag leaving the Lone Star Flag the de facto flag until 1933 when the when the 43rd Legislature reinstated the Lone Star Flag as the official state flag
    • Alamo – Spanish mission in San Antonio and site of a pivotal siege/battle that served to rally support for Houston’s army leading to Texas independence in 1836
  • National patriotic symbols
    • United States Flag – nicknamed the “Star and Stripes,” “Old Glory,” and “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the U.S. flag consists of 13 red and white stripes that represent the 13 original colonies and a canton (upper left-hand corner of a flag, also representing union) of blue with 50 stars that represent the states; the colors symbolize courage (red), purity (white), and loyalty (blue), as with the Texas flag; its original origins are inadequately documented but the Second Continental Congress passed the Flag Resolution of 1777 providing for a national flag; in 1818 Congress agreed to a plan of how the flag would evolve as new states were added
    • Liberty Bell – bell placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now Independence Hall) in Philadelphia and engraved with the Biblical quote “Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto the inhabitants thereof”; gained iconic status after a fictional short story described its ringing on July 4th (which did not happen) gained popularity in 1847
    • Statue of Liberty – colossal statue on Liberty Island in the middle of New York Harbor; a gift from France in 1886 to commemorate American independence 
1.14B Recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag and the Pledge to the Texas Flag.

Recite, Explain

THE PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE TO THE AMERICAN FLAG AND THE PLEDGE TO THE TEXAS FLAG

Including, but not limited to:

  • Pledge of Allegiance to the United States Flag – originally written in 1892 as a commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the discovery of America by Columbus; formally adopted in 1942 and last amended in 1956
  • Pledge to the Texas Flag – adopted by the 43rd Texas Legislature; last amended in 2007
1.14C Identify anthems and mottoes of Texas and the United States.

Identify

ANTHEMS AND MOTTOES OF TEXAS AND THE UNITED STATES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Anthem – songs of praise, devotion, or patriotism
    • Anthem (state song) of Texas
      • Texas, Our Texas
    • Anthem of the United States
      • Star Spangled Banner
  • Motto – short expression of guiding principle
    • Motto of Texas
      • Friendship
    • Motto of the United States
      • In God we trust (1956)

    Other “unofficial” anthems and mottoes

    • Anthems of Texas
      • Yellow Rose of Texas
      • Deep in the Heart of Texas
    • Anthems of United States
      • America, the Beautiful
      • God Bless America
      • My Country ‘Tis of Thee
    • Mottoes of Texas
      • Don’t Mess with Texas
      • Remember the Alamo
    • Mottoes of the United States
      • E pluribus unum: “out of many, one”
1.14E Explain how patriotic customs and celebrations reflect American individualism and freedom.

Explain

HOW PATRIOTIC CUSTOMS AND CELEBRATIONS REFLECT AMERICAN INDIVIDUALISM AND FREEDOM

Including, but not limited to:

  • Customs – habits, actions, and practices performed by a particular group or in a particular place.
  • Celebrations–the festive activities engaged in to commemorate a special occasion
  • Patriotic customs and celebrations that reflect American individualism and American freedom include honoring veterans on Veterans Day, learning about the U.S. Constitution, reciting the Pledge of Allegiance, and celebrating our nation’s independence on the 4th of July.
1.14F Identify Constitution Day as a celebration of American freedom.

Identify

CONSTITUTION DAY AS A CELEBRATION OF AMERICAN FREEDOM

Including, but not limited to:

  • To celebrate American freedom. Constitution Day commemorates the September 17, 1787, signing of the Constitution. The purpose of Constitution Day is to ensure that students are gaining an increased knowledge and appreciation for this valuable and important document of freedom. Beginning in 2005, schools receiving federal funds were mandated by Congress to observe Constitution Day on September 17.
1 Culture.
1.15 Culture. The student understands the importance of family and community beliefs, customs, language, and traditions. The student is expected to:
1.15A Describe and explain the importance of various beliefs, customs, language, and traditions of families and communities.

Describe, Explain

IMPORTANCE OF VARIOUS BELIEFS, CUSTOMS, LANGUAGE, AND TRADITIONS OF FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Beliefs – something accepted as true or practiced by a group of people who share in that belief; an opinion or conviction; faith
  • Customs – habits, actions, and practices performed by a particular group or in a particular place.  (e.g., Folkloric dancing, cultural celebrations, birth and death practices)
  • Traditions – a practice of a particular group of people that continues for several generations; a long established or inherited way of thinking or acting (e.g., participate in neighborhood parades on 4th of July)
1.15B Explain the way folktales and legends such as Aesop's fables reflect beliefs, customs, language, and traditions of communities.

Explain

HOW FOLKTALES AND LEGENDS REFLECT BELIEFS, CUSTOMS, LANGUAGE, AND TRADITIONS OF COMMUNITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Folktales – typically an anonymous story usually passed down orally among a people; often false or superstitious that speak to timeless themes
  • Legends – unverified stories handed down from earlier times, especially one popularly believed to be historical. (e.g., Johnny Appleseed, Mike Fink, Casey Jones, John Henry)
  • Fables – a short tale to teach a moral lesson, often with animals or inanimate objects as characters
  • Folktales, legends, and fables reflect common concerns shared by a community, illustrate the popular myths and beliefs of a people, illustrate lessons that the community finds important, and become the basis for some community traditions.
1 Social studies skills.
1.18 Social studies skills. The student communicates in oral, visual, and written forms. The student is expected to:
1.18A Express ideas orally based on knowledge and experiences.

Express

IDEAS ORALLY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Based on knowledge
  • Based on experiences
1.18B Create and interpret visual and written material.

Create, Interpret

MATERIALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Visual, written material
    • Pictures
    • Symbols
    • Electronic media
    • Maps
    • Artifacts
    • Graphs
    • Timelines
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/23/2018
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