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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 3 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 07: Making a Difference in the Community SUGGESTED DURATION : 20 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address actions by individuals and groups that improve the community. According to research, having positive role models helps children develop wholesome identities. Second only to parental influence, teachers and schools provide children with other positive influences in helping children develop their identities. By studying how individuals and groups contribute to the community, students gain an understanding of the importance of civic engagement for the well-being of communities.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about the governing of communities.

During this Unit

During this unit, students complete the Grade 3 curriculum by studying about inventive individuals who contributed to their communities, about heroes who have sacrificed for their communities, and about how individual citizens and civic groups contribute to the well-being of communities.

Research

Anderson, K. & Cavallaro, D. (2002) “Parents or Pop Culture? Children's Heroes and Role Models”. Childhood Education, 78.


Civically engaged citizens take informed action to improve the quality of life in the community.

What are the ways to effectively bring about change?

Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Individuals can shape the community by being inventive.

  • What famous individuals have used inventiveness to shape the local community, Texas, and the United States?
  • How do new inventions shape communities?

Civic Engagement

  • Civic Virtue
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Heroes make sacrifices to make the community better.

  • What famous heroes have made sacrifices for the local community, Texas and the United States?
  • Why are many community heroes also examples of good citizens?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Individuals and groups can improve communities in a variety of ways.

  • What are some ways that individuals and groups help to improve their communities?
  • What are some examples of civic groups and non-profit groups that help in communities?

Civic Engagement

  • Citizenship
  • Civic Virtue
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students often lack an understanding of the concept of a hero. Many equate being famous with being a hero. Many believe that in order to be considered a hero, one must die. Often underdeveloped is the idea that taking a stand against injustice, making physical sacrifices, and acting with bravery may make one a hero.
  • Students are often familiar only with heroes in the movies or cartoon superheroes, and do not realize that anyone can potentially be a hero.

Unit Vocabulary

  • inventive – having new ideas
    hero – a person who shows great courage in his/her actions to protect others or to provide for communities
    civic participation – taking part in activities that serve the community
    civic group – people who come together as an organization to serve the community

Related Vocabulary

  • inventions
  •  technology
non-profit
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
3 History.
3.1 History. The student understands how individuals, events, and ideas have influenced the history of various communities. The student is expected to:
3.1A Describe how individuals, events, and ideas have changed communities, past and present.

Describe

HOW INDIVIDUALS, EVENTS, AND IDEAS HAVE CHANGED COMMUNITIES, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Individuals change communities by taking on leadership roles in the community, volunteering in the community, modifying the environment of the community, and by creating businesses in the community.
  • Communities are physically changed by natural disasters, invasions, and conflicts along with economic decline and growth. Communities are also physically altered by the building of infrastructure and other modifications of the environment.
  • Communities have been changed by ideas about government, conservation, ecology, and scientific discoveries.
  • When new members join the community they introduce new ideas, new traditions, and new customs to the community.
3.1B Identify individuals, including Pierre-Charles L'Enfant, Benjamin Banneker, and Benjamin Franklin, who have helped to shape communities.

Identify

INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE HELPED SHAPE COMMUNITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Pierre-Charles L’Enfant –Born in France, L'Enfant applied French architectural styles to U.S. government buildings during the era of the early republic. He volunteered to fight in the American Revolution and wintered at Valley Forge in 1777, where he served as captain of engineers for a time. After the war, President George Washington commissioned him to design the emblems for the Society of the Cincinnati. L'Enfant converted the Old City Hall in Philadelphia to Federal Hall, to serve the U.S. Congress. When Washington, D.C. was chosen as the new site of the federal capital, Washington asked L'Enfant to design the city. L'Enfant was dismissed in 1792 because he did not listen to directions, overspent the budget, and ignored the claims of previous owners. Nonetheless, his plan is evident in the modern layout, with the White House and Capitol on high ground and the streets intersecting at landmarks. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000) 
    • He helped shape communities by helping design Washington, D.C and many of its buildings, such as the Capitol, Congress and the White House, applying French architectural styles.
  • Benjamin Banneker –Born a free African-American in Maryland, Benjamin Banneker overcame rural isolation, limited education, racial prejudice, and alcoholism to become a respectable scientist, mathematician, and astronomer. He worked on the survey crew which laid out the District of Columbia in 1791. In 1791 he sent a copy of his unpublished almanac and a letter to Thomas Jefferson pleading with him to make an effort to end slavery and ensure that all were entitled to the "inalienable rights" outlined in the Declaration of Independence. His almanac was published by a Philadelphia press from 1792 to 1797. Banneker was a symbol of racial equality and of black achievement. The Benjamin Banneker College at Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, Texas, bears his name. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000) 
    • He helped shape communities by influencing the design of Washington, D.C. and informing communities through his almanacs.
  • Benjamin Franklin –Born in Boston in 1706, the fifteenth child of a candlemaker, Benjamin Franklin became a well-known printer in Philadelphia and an active leader in the city. He published Poor Richard's Almanac between 1732 and 1758 and his autobiography in 1818. Through these he gained literary distinction. In the almanac, he shared bits of wisdom with readers and pithy sayings which helped shape the American character. He founded the first privately supported circulating library in America, in Philadelphia. Franklin was a member of the committee which wrote the Declaration of Independence, but spent most of the period of the American Revolution in France. He represented the colonies as the American envoy starting in 1776 and remained until 1785. He negotiated the alliance with France and then the Treaty of Paris which ended the war. He also participated in the U.S. Constitutional Convention in 1787, and earned distinction as the oldest delegate in attendance. Franklin's many talents earned him a reputation as "the first civilized American." In addition to his political activities, he supported education and was considered a gifted scientist without peer in the colonies. He proved that lightning was a form of electricity, a discovery that earned him international fame. He also invented bifocal glasses, lightning rods, and the Franklin stove. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000). Franklin formed Junto, or The Leather Apron Society, in 1727, an organization of people of varied backgrounds and skills who came together regularly to discuss issues of the day, needs of the community, and plans to improve the community (in this instance, Philadelphia). Modern day Junto clubs still exist in the U.S.
    • He helped shape communities by enlightening community members on many different issues through his almanacs and printings, and through his inventions that improved the quality of life for many. As a Founding Father he helped to craft the Declaration of Independence and Constitution which include the political ideas that form the basis of communities in America. As Postmaster, he put in place the Post Roads to improve communication. With his fire brigades and lending libraries, he shaped attitudes of communities as places where people work together for the safety, security, and betterment of the whole community.
3 Citizenship.
3.11 Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historical and contemporary figures. The student is expected to:
3.11B Identify historical figures such as Helen Keller and Clara Barton and contemporary figures such as Ruby Bridges and military and first responders who exemplify good citizenship.

Identify

PEOPLE WHO EXEMPLIFY GOOD CITIZENSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Historical figures
    • Helen Keller – political activist and advocate for women’s and worker’s rights, she was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. She graduated from Radcliffe College, wrote twelve books, and dedicated her life to improving the lives of people. She traveled the world speaking, raising money, and conducting research for the American Foundation for the Blind. She was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Lyndon Johnson.
    • Clara Barton –used her money and supplies to treat wounded Civil War soldiers; she was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln to find missing Union soldiers. She helped establish nursing as a skilled profession during the Civil War, and she founded the American Red Cross.
  • Contemporary figures
    • Ruby Bridges – the first African American child to attend an all-white elementary school after court-ordered desegregation from Brown v. Board of Education. She demonstrated courage highlighting the inequality of public school at the time.
    • Military members – Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard, reserve and National Guard members. They are willing to sacrifice their lives in defense of the Constitution and the United States
    • First responders – all emergency personnel who are the first to respond in a crisis or natural disaster such firefighters, police officers, and paramedics. They are willing to sacrifice their personal health and safety to protect their fellow citizens.
3.12 Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:
3.12A Give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions.

Give examples

COMMUNITY CHANGES THAT RESULT FROM INDIVIDUAL OR GROUP DECISIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Local elections such as school boards, city council, and mayor
  • Bond elections result in community improvements, such as new schools and roads
  • Decisions of mayor, school board, and city council
  • Business owners’ decision about location and/or type of business
  • Community members’ individual decisions improve, tear down, or rebuild one’s home
  • Individual’s decision to participate in local government by attending meetings, signing petitions, writing letters, and making one’s voice and opinions heard
3.12B Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community.

Identify

EXAMPLES OF ACTIONS INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS CAN TAKE TO IMPROVE THE COMMUNITY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Individuals
    • Local individuals whose actions have improved the community
    • Examples include: individuals acting in the best interests of the community, acting as advocates for others, hosting community discussions, supporting locally-owned businesses, reading with school children, planning a community beautification day, planning volunteer action days, hosting voter registration drives, conducting philanthropy
  • Groups
    • Local groups who whose actions have improved the community
    • Examples include volunteer organizations, such as those who clean up parks and roadsides, run recycling and conservation projects, and donate time and money for the good of the community.
3.12C Identify examples of nonprofit and/or civic organizations such as the Red Cross and explain how they serve the common good.

Identify, Explain

EXAMPLES OF NONPROFIT AND/OR CIVIC ORGANIZATIONS AND HOW THEY SERVE THE COMMON GOOD

Including, but not limited to:

  • Red Cross – nonprofit organization that provides for community members in the event of a natural disaster; founded by Clara Barton
  • Other possible examples: homeless shelter, soup kitchen, animal shelter, battered women’s shelter, United Way, Lion’s Club, Shriners, Civitans, Rotary Club, Kiwanis, Habitat for Humanity, others from the local community
  • Common good – the idea that there is a shared sense of responsibility among members/citizens in a society that balances the needs of the individual with the needs of the community
3 Culture.
3.14 Culture. The student understands the role of heroes in shaping the culture of communities, the state, and the nation. The student is expected to:
3.14A Identify and compare the heroic deeds of state and national heroes, including Hector P. Garcia and James A. Lovell, and other individuals such as Harriet Tubman, Juliette Gordon Low, Todd Beamer, Ellen Ochoa, John "Danny" Olivas, and other contemporary heroes.

Identify, Compare

HEROIC DEEDS OF HEROES

Including, but not limited to:

  • National heroes
    • James A Lovell – crew member on Apollo 8, the first manned ship to leave Earth’s gravitational influence; Commander of Apollo 13, first person to travel to the moon twice; returned the damaged Apollo 13 back from an orbit around the moon to land safely back on Earth
    • Harriet Tubman – Born into slavery, Tubman escaped to freedom in Philadelphia from Maryland in 1849; led other escaped enslaved people to freedom on the Underground Railroad. She lived in St. Catherine's, Ontario, after 1850 when the Fugitive Slave Act made it easy for bounty hunters and slaveholders to kidnap escaped enslaved people. The first Black Heritage series postage stamp, released in 1978, depicted Harriet Tubman for her bravery and activism
    • Juliette Gordon Low – founder of the Girl Scouts
    • Todd Beamer – passenger aboard hijacked United Flight 93 during the September 11th terrorist attacks (2001), credited with thwarting terrorist attempts to crash the plane into a national landmark, he led passengers to fight with terrorists to take control of the plane; it crashed instead in a remote area of Pennsylvania. Coined the phrase “Let’s roll;” died when the plane crashed.
    • Ellen Ochoa – first Hispanic female astronaut to enter space. Holds a doctorate in electrical engineering and three patents for optical engineering systems. Currently Director of the Johnson Space Center.
  • State heroes
    • Hector P. Garcia – descendant of Spanish land grantees, a physician, surgeon, Second World War, veteran, civil rights leader, founder of the American G.I. Forum to represent the interests of Hispanic veterans, recipient of the Presidential Medal of Honor
    • John ‘Danny’ Olivas – space shuttle astronaut from El Paso. Holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering from Rice University, and six patents
  • Other contemporary heroes – local veterans, first responders, community volunteers, and others who act heroically in the community
3.14B Identify and analyze the heroic deeds of individuals, including military and first responders such as the Four Chaplains.

Identify, Analyze

HEROIC DEEDS OF INDIVIDUALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Military members
  • First responders
  • The Four Chaplains – during the Second World War, four U.S. Army chaplains who sacrificed themselves by giving away their lifejackets to save others when the transport ship Dorchester sank
3 Science, technology, and society.
3.16 Science, technology, and society. The student understands how individuals have created or invented new technology and affected life in various communities, past and present. The student is expected to:
3.16A Identify scientists and inventors, including Jonas Salk, Maria Mitchell, and others who have discovered scientific breakthroughs or created or invented new technology such as Cyrus McCormick, Bill Gates, and Louis Pasteur.

Identify

SCIENTISTS AND INVENTORS WHO HAVE DISCOVERED SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS OR CREATED OR INVENTED NEW TECHNOLOGY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Jonas Salk – American microbiologist who invented the vaccine to prevent polio. Jonas Salk was the oldest child of Jewish immigrants from Poland. He earned his medical degree from the New York University School of Medicine and then worked with Thomas Francis, Jr. at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, funded by a National Research Council fellowship. They developed a "killed-virus" vaccine to deter type A and B influenza viruses. In 1947 he moved to the Virus Research Laboratory at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and built a lab to accommodate his research efforts. By 1952, Salk was ready to test his "killed-virus" polio vaccine and the trial inoculations began in 1954. By the end of 1955, seven million children were immunized and cases of polio were reduced by 96 percent. Salk's approach differed from that of Albert Sabin, the leading advocate of a live-virus polio vaccine. By 1958, Sabin's oral vaccine replaced Salk's intravenous shot, but Salk is still credited as having defeated polio. He founded the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, California, in 1960, earned the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1977, and worked in the field of science until his death. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000)
  • Maria Mitchell – American scientist and first acknowledged female astronomer in the United States. Her father, valuing equality and being a teacher and astronomer, encouraged his daughter to receive the same education as boys. As a librarian of twenty years, Mitchell often stayed after the library closed to read as many of the books she could. Her father built an observatory on the roof of the local bank so the two of them could explore the universe through a small telescope. In 1847, she discovered a comet, eventually named Miss Mitchell’s Comet. This famed achievement led her to be the first female to join the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is also considered likely the first women hired as a professional for the federal government serving as a celestial observer for the U.S. Coastal Survey to develop better weather forecasting. She was also a strong opponent of slavery and refused to wear any cotton harvested by enslaved people. She was the first female faculty member appointed to Vassar College as a professor of astronomy. She led several professional organizations including helping to found today’s American Association of University Women as well as serving as Vice President of the American Social Science Association demonstrating her interest in the “hard” sciences like astronomy as well as the “soft” social sciences. Mitchell crater on the moon is named for her.
  • Cyrus McCormick – invented the mechanical reaper. The son of a farmer/blacksmith/inventor, McCormick applied his talents to the invention, improvement, manufacture and marketing of a successful mechanical reaper, patented in 1834. Reapers, pulled by horses, cut the grain for harvesters to bind and stack in the fields. Prior to adoption of the mechanical reaper, a farmer could only plant as much wheat as he could harvest, since ripe wheat was easily ruined. The grain was often lost during harvest if the wheat was overripe, and storms could destroy entire crops. Labor was expensive because it was in great demand. The reaper allowed farmers to plant more wheat because they had the potential to harvest more. McCormick moved to Chicago in 1847 to take advantage of the growing market for reapers as wheat cultivation moved into the plains of the United States and Canada. Reapers and other machines revolutionized grain cultivation, and as the international grain trade increased after 1880, mechanization became more important. In 1902, his son Cyrus, Jr. merged McCormick Company with other firms to form International Harvester Company. It competed successfully with a half dozen other farm machinery manufacturers for worldwide distribution up to the late 1980s. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000)
  • Bill Gates – Gates grew up with the computer industry and maintained a leadership role through widespread use of his own product, Microsoft. Born in Seattle, Washington, Gates attended Harvard University before founding Microsoft Corporation in Redmond, Washington, in 1976. He was named C.E.O. of the Year by Chief Executive magazine in 1994, and has written two books, The Future and The Road Ahead. In The Road Ahead he urges readers to take the potential of the information highway seriously. His life reflects the evolution of the computer industry from mainframes to personal computers and the Internet. He believes that the inexpensive connections of computers around the world herald a communications revolution, one of benefit to everyone. He urges governments, private citizens, and manufacturers to cooperate in the process. Education stood to realize the biggest gain and Gates supported the application of innovative technology in classrooms. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000)
  • Louis Pasteur– French chemist who discovered that heat could kill bacteria which otherwise spoiled liquids, including wine and beer. He was the first to understand microscopic organisms, and a paper he published following his research with wine introduced the field of microbiology. He proved that the growth of bacteria resulted from germs in the air and not spontaneous generation. He applied the process of heating liquids to kill bacteria to other products including milk. The process is known as "pasteurization." In the 1870s, Pasteur applied his efforts toward human diseases, beginning with anthrax, a disease which affected animals and people. He also invented a vaccine to counter the effects of rabies. Pasteur directed the Pasteur Institute dedicated to rabies research until his death. (TEA – Social Studies Center Biographies, 2000)
3.16B Identify the impact of scientific breakthroughs and new technology in computers, pasteurization, and medical vaccines on various communities.

Identify

IMPACT OF SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGHS AND NEW TECHNOLOGY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computers – the personal computer revolution and the advent of the Internet have globalized the information age
  • Pasteurization – has allowed for safe food storage and handling
  • Medical vaccines – have helped to eradicate some diseases from spreading and controlled the effects of pandemics, such as polio and small pox
3 Social studies skills.
3.17 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
3.17A Research information, including historical and current events, and geographic data, about the community and world, using a variety of valid print, oral, visual, and Internet resources.

Research

INFORMATION ABOUT THE COMMUNITY AND WORLD USING A VARIETY OF SOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Print sources (e.g., newspapers, books, and periodicals)
  • Oral sources (e.g., conversations, interviews)
  • Visual sources (e.g., maps, pictures, photographs, charts and graphs, film documentaries, and news reports)
  • Internet sources (e.g., internet searches, databases)
3.17E Interpret and create visuals, including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps.

Interpret, Create

VISUALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Graphs
  • Charts
  • Tables
  • Timelines
  • Illustrations
  • Maps
3.18 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
3.18B Use technology to create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers to express ideas.

Use

TECHNOLOGY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Technology
  • Examples: Word, PowerPoint, online databases, search engines, web pages

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL TO EXPRESS IDEAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Written Material
    • Stories
    • Poems
    • Graphic organizers
  • Visual Material
    • Pictures
    • Maps
  • Graphic organizers
3.18C Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

Use

WRITTEN SKILLS TO COMMUNICATE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Standard grammar
  • Spelling
  • Sentence structure
  • Punctuation
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/23/2018
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