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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 4 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 03: American Indian Life In Texas SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate to the lifestyles of the American Indians living in Texas before the arrival of European explorers. Prior to European colonization of Texas, several societies of American Indians made Texas their home. Adapting to the various physical regions of Texas created a variety of lifestyles among the American Indian groups living in Texas. For example the American Indian societies of East Texas created permanent settlements, while those in West Texas were nomadic. A study of the lifestyles of the American Indian groups in Texas provides students with a context for examining how geography impacts the daily lives of Texans.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students have learned about the characteristics of the physical geographic regions of Texas along with how physical geography influenced current settlement and economic patterns in Texas. Students have also been introduce to the skills used by historians in order to study the past.

During this Unit

During this unit, students study about the characteristics of the American Indian groups living in Texas prior to the arrival of Europeans, and about how physical geography affected the lives of these societies, including the types of economic activities they engaged in, how they adapted to the environment, and the characteristics of governments they established. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by acquiring information from various sources. The social studies skill TEKS 4.21A included in this unit supports the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students learn about exploration of Texas by Europeans and about life in the Texas missions.   


Humans have a complex relationship with the environment.

  • What is characteristic of the interactions between humans and the environment?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Texas was home to a variety of American Indian groups that migrated to the region.

  • How and why do historians believe American Indian tribes migrated to Texas?
  • What American Indian tribes were in Texas prior to the arrival of European explorers?
  • What American Indian tribes are still in Texas today?
  • In what regions of Texas did the various American Indian tribes live?

Spatial Patterns

  • Region/Borders
  • Migration
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The physical environment shaped the lifestyles of the American Indian groups living in Texas.

  • What was characteristic of the daily lives of American Indian tribes in Texas?
  • How did the physical environment impact the lifestyles of American Indian tribes living in Texas?
  • In what ways did American Indian tribes in Texas adapt to the environment?
  • What was characteristic of the economies and governments established by the American Indian tribes in Texas?

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction

Economic Patterns

  • Economic Systems

Political Patterns

  • Governmental Systems
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

Unit Vocabulary

barter – exchanging a good or service for a good or service
nomadic – moving from one place to another without a permanent home
sedentary – remaining in one place
economic system – process created to manage the production, consumption, and distribution of goods and services
political system – process created to govern societies
adapt – to become accustomed to the conditions
modify – to make changes to the current conditions

Related Vocabulary

  • physical characteristics
  • human characteristics
  • hunter and gatherer 
  •  physical environment
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
4 History.
4.1 History. The student understands the origins, similarities, and differences of American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration. The student is expected to:
4.1A Explain the possible origins of American Indian groups in Texas and North America.

Explain

POSSIBLE ORIGINS OF AMERICAN INDIAN GROUPS IN TEXAS AND NORTH AMERICA

Including, but not limited to:

  • Possible origins
    • American Indian groups – any of the indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. The ancestors of the American Indians groups in both Texas and North America are generally considered to have entered the Americas from Asia by way of the Bering Strait sometime during the late glacial epoch.
    • Ice Age – during the Ice Age, sea levels dropped as more water was frozen at the poles. The shallow seabed near Alaska was exposed forming a land bridge (Beringia) between Asia and North America for several thousand years allowing people to travel across it. As sea levels rose, the strait reopened approximately 15,000 years ago leaving the inhabitants isolated from events and developments across Eurasia and Africa. As glaciers in Canada melted, the way south into North America opened allowing Paleo-Indians to spread across the Western Hemisphere.
4.1B Identify American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration such as the Lipan Apache, Karankawa, Caddo, and Jumano.

Identify

AMERICAN INDIAN GROUPS IN TEXAS AND NORTH AMERICA BEFORE EUROPEAN EXPLORATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Gulf Coastal Plains
    • Caddo – the largest group of American Indian tribes in Texas. The Caddo lived across East Texas. Caddo tribes lived varied lives with some hunting and gathering, while others farmed corn and ranched along the Red River. Many tribes lived and practiced religious ceremonies in dome-shaped buildings. The Caddo were organized into political confederations of tribes. Often greeted the Europeans with the word “Tejas” which is popularly considered the origin of the state name “Texas.”
    • Karankawa – lived along the beaches of the Gulf Coast and were nomadic. Fished and hunted along the Gulf Coast, migrating along the coast using dugout canoes.
  • Central Plains
    • Tonkawa – a consolidated group of independent tribes who were nomads living on the Edwards’s Plateau and Hill Country. Tribal groups were hunters and gatherers, primarily hunting buffalo, deer, and small animals. The Tonkawa origins may come from a fragmented tribe that migrated from the high plains as recently as 300-400 years ago.
  • Great Plains
    • Lipan Apache – a Texas nomadic American Indian tribe hunting mostly buffalo and gathering food. The Lipan Apaches and Spanish forces were frequently in conflict during the 1700s as well as with Mexican and U.S. forces during the 1800s. Adapted to horses when introduced by the Europeans.
  • Mountain and Basin
    • Jumano – lived in parts of present-day New Mexico and West Texas; farmed, hunted, and traded. Some were nomadic, living either in tee-pees; others lived in pueblo-like dwellings.
4.1C Describe the regions in which American Indians lived and identify American Indian groups remaining in Texas such as the Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo, Alabama-Coushatta, and Kickapoo.

Describe

REGIONS IN WHICH AMERICAN INDIANS LIVED AND THE GROUPS REMAINING IN TEXAS TODAY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Gulf Coastal Plains
    • Waterways
    • Much vegetation
    • Mild climate throughout the year
    • Prairies and plains
    • Many small animals and some buffalo
    • American Indian groups
      • Karankawa
      • Caddo
      • Coahuiltecan
      • Alabama-Coushatta – today: reservation located outside Livingston, Texas
      • Kickapoo – today: reservation in Eagle Pass, crosses into Mexico
  • Central Plains
    • Rolling prairies
    • Edwards Plateau
    • Some waterways
    • Buffalo and deer
    • Hot summers and mild winters
    • American Indian groups
      • Tonkawa
  • Great Plains
    • High plains and plateaus
    • Canyons
    • Buffalo and deer
    • Hot summers and cold winters
    • American Indian groups
      • Lipan Apache
      • Comanche
      • Kiowa
  • Mountain and Basin
    • Desert
    • Harsh climate – hot days, cool nights
    • Mountains
    • Basins
    • Small animals
    • American Indian groups
      • Jumano
      • Concho
      • Tigua Ysleta Del Sur Pueblo – today: located outside El Paso, Texas
4.1D Compare the ways of life of American Indian groups in Texas and North America before European exploration.

Compare

WAYS OF LIFE OF AMERICAN INDIAN GROUPS IN TEXAS AND NORTH AMERICA BEFORE EUROPEAN EXPLORATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Gulf Coastal Plains – Caddo
    • Sedentary, complex political system, agricultural society, lived in dome-shaped huts
  • Gulf Coastal Plains – Karankawa
    • Nomadic, fish, hunt small animals, and gather
  • Central Plains – Tonkawa
    • Sedentary, but hunted buffalo and fished. Did not have to migrate because of abundant food in the area.
  • Great Plains – Comanche
    • Nomadic, lived in tipis (teepees), great warriors, hunted buffalo and used all parts of it to survive. When the Europeans introduced the horse, they became skilled horsemen.
  • Great Plains – Apache
    •  Nomadic hunters of buffalo and farmers; due to scarcity of resources raided other tribes; skilled with bow and arrows
  • Mountain and Basin – Pueblo: Jumano and Concho
    • Sedentary, lived in homes made of adobe that were entered from the roof; lived along rivers and streams; agricultural; hunter-gatherer
  • Similarities
    • Used the environment for basic needs
    • Adapted to their environment
  • Differences
    • Some are sedentary and some are nomadic
    • The Indians who lived in harsher climates and regions were more warlike. Those who were farmers were less warlike.
4 Geography.
4.6 Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
4.6A Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps.

Apply

GEOGRAPHIC TOOLS TO CONSTRUCT AND INTERPRET MAPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Grid systems – a grid system is a network of horizontal and vertical lines used to locate points on a map or a chart by means of coordinates.
  • Legends – an explanatory list of the symbols appearing on a chart or map. Sometimes, this is called a key.
  • Symbols – a symbol is something which stands for or suggests something else. It can be a visible sign of something which is intangible.
  • Scales – a scale indicates the relationship between the distances on a map, chart, or plan and the corresponding actual distances. Examples include “1 inch equals 1 mile”
  • Compass rose – a compass rose is a circle or similar design which includes graduated degrees or quarter points and show compass directions.
  • Other elements of maps
    • Title
    • Date of Map
    • Author of Map
  • Suggested maps students could construct
    • Distribution of American Indian tribes in Texas
4.9 Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:
4.9A Describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as timber clearing, agricultural production, wetlands drainage, energy production, and construction of dams.

Describe

WAYS PEOPLE HAVE ADAPTED TO AND MODIFIED THEIR ENVIRONMENT IN TEXAS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Adapting to the environment almost always results in a modification of the environment. Humans have generally modified the environment in order to have shelter and food, access resources, protect against natural disasters, and transport people and goods.
  • In order to farm in some areas of Texas, timber needed to be cleared. Timber was also cut to use for building shelter.
  • The Texas frontier was modified by the building of railroads.
  • Windmills were introduced into western regions of Texas to allow for ranching in the arid climate.
  • Galveston Bay was dredged and sand used to elevate the city of Galveston to protect against tropical storms and hurricanes.
  • Wetlands around Houston have been drained to create stable land.
  • Bayous and wetlands were drained and redesigned to create the Port of Houston.
  • Dams have been built throughout the state, significantly along the Colorado River, to control flooding and to generate energy.
  • As Texas urbanized highways were built to meet growing transportation needs. .
  • Drilling for oil and the creating of windmill farms came about as a modification to meet the demand for energy.
4 Economics.
4.10 Economics. The student understands the basic economic activities of early societies in Texas and North America. The student is expected to:
4.10A Explain the economic activities various early American Indian groups in Texas and North America used to meet their needs and wants such as farming, trading, and hunting.

Explain

ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES USED BY VARIOUS EARLY AMERICAN INDIAN GROUPS IN TEXAS AND NORTH AMERICA TO MEET THEIR NEEDS AND WANTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Farming
    • Caddo (Gulf Coast) and Jumano (Mountains and Basins) grew crops, specifically corn, to provide for the tribe. Excess was traded with neighboring tribes.
  • Trading
    • Nomadic American Indians groups bartered excess hides or products with neighboring tribes.
    • Settled tribes like the Caddo made jewelry, pottery, and tools to trade with neighboring tribes.
  • Hunting
    • All American Indian groups hunted and gathered food to meet needs.
    • Nomadic American Indian groups such as the American Indians of the Great Plains and North Central Plains hunted buffalo, deer, and other animals to meet their basic needs of home, clothing, and tools.
    • Karankawa, Caddo, and Jumano Indianshunted small animals and fished.
4 Government.
4.14 Government. The student understands how people organized governments in different ways during the early development of Texas. The student is expected to:
4.14A Compare how various American Indian groups such as the Caddo and the Comanche governed themselves.

Compare

HOW AMERICAN INDIAN GROUPS GOVERNED THEMSELVES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Caddo
    • Each village had a chief or main leader. The chief led the village with a small group of older tribe members.
    • The chief and the group served as the government for the village, keeping order and providing protection to the people.
    • Caddo villages formed a confederation to help one another.
  • Comanche
    • Tribes/groups had a chief to lead warriors and other chiefs to make decisions and solve problems in times of peace.
    • A council or group of leaders helped make decisions
4 Social studies skills.
4.21 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
4.21A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computer software
  • Interviews
  • Biographies
  • Oral, print, and visual material
  • Documents
  • Artifacts
4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • By using skills of:
    • Sequencing
    • Categorizing
    • Identifying cause-and-effect relationship
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Finding the main idea
    • Summarizing
    • Making generalizations and predictions
    • Drawing inferences and conclusions
4.21C Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Information in:
    • Outlines
    • Reports
    • Databases
    • Visuals
    • Graphs
    • Charts
    • Timelines
    • Maps
4.22 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/24/2018
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