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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 4 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 06: Revolution in Texas SUGGESTED DURATION : 15 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate to the events of the revolt in Texas that brought about independence for the region from Mexico. As tensions grew in Texas, Mexican officials attempted to impose more control over the settlers. Eventually political changes in Mexico forced settlers in Texas to pursue independence. While the movement towards independence had been growing for years, it took less than a year for Texans to gain independence.  During that time, Texans met to form a new government as well as battle Mexico’s army at Gonzales, the Alamo, Goliad, and San Jacinto.  The victory at San Jacinto signified the end of Mexican rule in Texas. A study of the Texas Revolution in important for understanding the relationship between Texas, the United States, and Mexico today.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about the empresario system established by the Mexican government and about the geographic and cultural changes brought about by the migration of settlers to the land grants in Texas.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about the dissatisfaction with Mexico’s political changes that grew among Texans, about the leaders of the Texas Revolution and about the significant events of the revolution, including the creation of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Battle of the Alamo, and the victory at the Battle of San Jacinto. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by acquiring information from various sources. The social studies skill TEKS 4.21A included in this unit supports the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students study about the establishment of the Republic of Texas and the annexation of Texas to the United States.   


People act for change when they can no longer tolerate the conditions in which they live.

  • How do people act effectively to address intolerable conditions in society?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Dissatisfaction with the political changes taking place in Mexico resulted in Texans declaring independence.

  • Why were Texan settlers upset with the government in Mexico?
  • Why were Texans willing to support a revolution?
  • Why was the creation of a Texas Declaration of Independence a significant event?
  • What role did Lorenzo de Zavala take on during the Texas Revolution?
  • When is Texas Independence Day celebrated?

Political Patterns

  • Independence Movements
  • Revolution
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Fighting between Mexican soldiers and Texans at Gonzales marked the beginning of the revolution, while the defeat at the Alamo both motivated and frightened Texans.

  • Why did violence erupt between Mexican soldiers and Texans?
  • Why was the Battle of the Alamo such a significant event in the Texas Revolution?
  • Which significant Texans gave their lives at the Battle of the Alamo, and which Texans helped to record the events of the Alamo?
  • Why did the Runaway Scrape happen?

Political Patterns

  • Revolution

Historical Processes

  • Conflict/ Cooperation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The revolution ended with the victory at the Battle of San Jacinto thereby securing independence for Texas.

  • How was the Texan army able to defeat Santa Anna at the Battle of San Jacinto?
  • What was significant about Sam Houston’s leadership during the Texas Revolution?

Political Patterns

  • Revolution

Historical Processes

  • Conflict/ Cooperation
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students sometimes mistakenly believe that Texans were victorious at the Battle of the Alamo.

Unit Vocabulary

dictator – a leaders who takes total control
independence – being free to control oneself
federalism – political system in which power is shared between a national centralized government and a collection of smaller state governments
political revolution – changing from one governmental structure to another 
treaty – a formal agreement between countries

Related Vocabulary

     
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
4 History.
4.3 History. The student understands the importance of the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States. The student is expected to:
4.3A Analyze the causes, major events, and effects of the Texas Revolution, including the Battle of the Alamo, the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Runaway Scrape, and the Battle of San Jacinto.

Analyze

CAUSES, MAJOR EVENTS, AND EFFECTS OF TEXAS REVOLUTION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Causes
    • Settlers were culturally tied to the United States, not Mexico
    • Mexican authorities disapproved of slavery and the enslaved people colonists brought illegally
    • The Mexican Constitution of 1824 was overturned in favor of a centralized federal government system
    • The Mexican government and Texas colonists could not build consistent relations over time as the Mexican government frequently changed political positions as the nation sorted out its new independence
    • Texas was not its own state in Mexico
    • An ongoing belief in Manifest Destiny among colonists
    • The Texas militia fired a cannon at the Mexican soldiers in Gonzales trying to take back the cannon beginning the Texas Revolution
    • The delegates at the Washington-on-the Brazos declared independence from Mexico.
  • Major Events
    • Battle of the Alamo
      • Texans did not want to give up the Alamo to Santa Anna. Delaying the Mexican army allowed General Houston to further organize and train his troops.
      • Texans were surrounded at the Alamo. Mexican forces went on the offensive after a 13 day siege.
      • The Alamo fell to Mexican forces the morning of March 6, 1836.
      • The result was the cry, “Remember the Alamo” and encouraged support for Texas independence.
      • Texas Declaration of Independence
      • Texans perceived the Mexican government did not respect the rights of the colonists.
      • Delegates at the Washington-on-the Brazos declared independence.
      • This declaration began the fight for independence as opposed to reform of the Mexican government.
    • Runaway Scrape
      • Santa Anna’s “take no prisoners” policy after the Alamo frightened many Texan families which led Houston to order the retreat of his army and advising settlers to leave as well.  
      • Families fled east to the United States and left their homes and belongings behind, though many stayed behind. Civilian causalities resulted in the loss 10-20% of the population in Texas.
    • Battle of San Jacinto
      • Texan forces led by Sam Houston surprised the Mexican forces and won the battle.
      • The battle lasted 18 minutes with Santa Anna being captured the next day.
  • Effects
    • Texans won independence from Mexico and established the Republic of Texas.
    • Ongoing instability between Texas and Mexico erupt into war again after the United States annexed Texas.
4.3B Summarize the significant contributions of individuals such as Texians William B. Travis, James Bowie, David Crockett, George Childress, and Sidney Sherman; Tejanos Juan Antonio Padilla, Carlos Espalier, Juan N. Seguín, Plácido Benavides, and José Francisco Ruiz; Mexicans Antonio López de Santa Anna and Vicente Filisola; and non-combatants Susanna Dickinson and Enrique Esparza.

Summarize

SIGNIFICANT CONTRIBUTIONS OF INDIVIDUALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Texian – used in place of the word Texan throughout the period of the Texas Revolution and the Texas Republic; immigrants from the United States and countries other than Mexico who became residents in the Tejas and Coahuila areas of Mexico that later became Texas
    • William B. Travis
      • Lawyer, soldier; military Leader at the Alamo
      • Wrote the famous Victory or Death letter to try to persuade people to come and help at the Alamo
      • Died at the Alamo
    • James Bowie
      • Pioneer, soldier, slavery trader, frontiersman, real estate speculator; military leader at the Alamo until he fell sick
      • Died at the Alamo
    • David Crockett
      • Frontiersman, folk hero, soldier, politician
      • Served as a congressional representative for Tennessee
      • Moved to Texas; fought and died at the Alamo
    • George Childress
      • Chair of the committee that wrote the Texas Declaration of Independence; likely the primary author
    • Sidney Sherman
      • Soldier, entrepreneur; fought and led a regiment at the Battle of San Jacinto
      • Given credit for the battle cry “Remember the Alamo”
  • Tejano – a native-born Mexican from the state of Coahuila y Tejas; Spanish for "Texan;" a term used to identify a Texan of Mexican and/or Latin-American descent
    • Juan Antonio Padilla
      • He was part of George M. Collinsworth's company and participated in the capture of Victoria
      • Former Mexican government official and Secretary of State for Coahuila y Tejas
    • Carlos Espalier
      • A protégé of James Bowie
      • Died at the Alamo
    • Juan N. Seguín
      • Texas senator, mayor, and judge
      • Was a messenger at the Alamo; the Alamo fell before he returned
      • Fought at the Battle of San Jacinto
    • Plácido Benavides
      • Renowned for settling Victoria, Texas
      • Trained Texas soldiers after the Battle of Gonzales
      • Captured Goliad
      • Delivered messages to Morris and Fannin
      • Loyal to Mexico, not Santa Anna
      • Because of his loyalty to Mexico, was forced to flee after the Battle of San Jacinto to New Orleans
    • Jose Francisco Ruiz
      • Supported Texas during the Revolution
      • Delegate at the Convention of 1836 and signed the Texas Declaration of Independence
  • Mexicans
    • Antonio López de Santa Anna
      • Military leader of the Mexican army and dictator of Mexico
      • Surrendered to Texas forces
    • Vicente Filisola
      • Second in command of the Mexican army
      • Since Santa Anna had been arrested, it was up to Filisola to withdraw Mexican forces from Texas
      • He evacuated San Antonio and agreed to the public Treaty of Velasco
  • Non-Combatants
    • Susanna Dickinson
      • Santa Anna sent Susanna Dickinson to Gonzales to tell Sam Houston what had happen at the Alamo. She and her daughter were the only two survivors of the Alamo.
      • Provided first-hand accounts of the events that occurred at the Alamo
    • Enrique Esparza
      • Son of Gregoria Esparza who witnessed the events at the Alamo
      • Provided first-hand accounts of the events that occurred at the Alamo
4 Geography.
4.6 Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
4.6A Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps.

Apply

GEOGRAPHIC TOOLS TO CONSTRUCT AND INTERPRET MAPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Grid systems – a network of horizontal and vertical lines used to locate points on a map or a chart by means of coordinates
  • Legends – an explanatory list of the symbols appearing on a chart or map. Sometimes, this is called a key
  • Symbols – a symbol is something which stands for or suggests something else. It can be a visible sign of something which is intangible.
  • Scales – a scale indicates the relationship between the distances on a map, chart, or plan and the corresponding actual distances. Examples include “1 inch equals 1 mile.”
  • Compass rose – a compass rose is a circle or similar design which includes graduated degrees or quarter points and shows compass directions
  • Other elements of maps
    • Title
    • Date of map
    • Author of map
  • Suggested maps students could construct
    • Battles of Texas Revolution
4 Government.
4.15 Government. The student understands important ideas in historical documents of Texas and the United States. The student is expected to:
4.15A

Identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Texas Constitution, and other documents such as the Meusebach-Comanche Treaty.

Identify, Explain

PURPOSES, IMPORTANCE OF DOCUMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Texas Declaration of Independence – declared independence from Mexico; patterned after the United States’ document
4 Citizenship.
4.16 Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations of Texas. The student is expected to:
4.16A Explain the meaning of various patriotic symbols and landmarks of Texas, including the six flags that flew over Texas, the San Jacinto Monument, the Alamo, and various missions.

Explain

THE MEANING OF PATRIOTIC SYMBOLS AND LANDMARKS OF TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Six flags over Texas – in the course of history, Texas has been politically affiliated with Spain, France, Mexico, Republic of Texas, the Confederate States of America, and the United States
  • San Jacinto Monument – erected in 1936 at San Jacinto (outside of Houston) to acknowledge those who fought for independence there
  • The Alamo – a symbol of the courage of Texans during the Texas Revolution despite the loss.
  • Other various missions – San José Mission: known as the “queen of the missions;” first successful mission resulting in more settlements in Texas
4.16D

 

Describe the origins and significance of state celebrations such as Texas Independence Day and Juneteenth.

Describe

ORIGINS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF STATE CELEBRATIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Texas Independence Day
    • March 2,1836; date on which Texan leaders declared independence from Mexico while at Washington-on-the-Brazos
4.17 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of active individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:
4.17D

Identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals.

Identify

IMPORTANCE OF HISTORICAL FIGURES AND IMPORTANT INDIVIDUALS WHO MODELED ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sam Houston
    • Military leader during the Texas Revolutio
  • Lorenzo de Zavala
    • Helped write the Texas Declaration of Independence
    • Helped design the ad interim government at Washington-on-the Brazos
  • Local individuals
4 Social studies skills.
4.21 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • By using skills of:
    • Sequencing
    • Categorizing
    • Identifying cause-and-effect relationship
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Finding the main idea
    • Summarizing
    • Making generalizations and predictions
    • Drawing inferences and conclusions
4.21C Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Information in:
    • Outlines
    • Reports
    • Databases
    • Visuals
      • Graphs
      • Charts
      • Timelines
      • Maps
4.21A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computer software
  • Interviews
  • Biographies
  • Oral, print, and visual material
  • Documents
  • Artifacts
4.22 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
4.22B Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication.

Incorporate

MAIN AND SUPPORTING IDEAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • In verbal communication
  • In written communication
4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
4.22E Use standard grammar, spelling, sentence structure, and punctuation.

Use

STANDARD GRAMMAR, SPELLING, SENTENCE STRUCTURE AND PUNCTUATION


Including, but not limited to:

  • Grammar
  • Spelling
  • Sentence structure
  • Punctuation
  • Proper citation of sources
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/24/2018
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