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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 4 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 07: Republic of Texas and Statehood SUGGESTED DURATION : 15 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate the establishment of the Republic of Texas and the annexation of Texas to the United States. After the Texas Revolution, Texans were challenged to create a new political system for Texas, to deal with the threats from American Indians in the region, and to establish the boundary of Texas. The new republic was modeled after the U.S. republic and some Texans wanted Texas to join the United States. Early leaders of the Texas republic worked to provide security for Texans, establish government services, and address financial issues.  Eventually Texans decided that many of the financial problems faced by the republic could be solved by joining the United States. The annexation of Texas triggered a boundary dispute with Mexico and war broke out between Mexico and the United States. The treaties that ended the war established the borders of Texas. An examination of the challenges faced by the leaders of the Republic of Texas is necessary for understanding the unique path to statehood taken by Texas.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students studied about the Texas Revolution, including the reasons for the revolution, the leaders of the revolution, and the significant events of the revolution.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about the constitutional republic created by the leaders of the Republic of Texas, along with the significance of the Texas Constitution, the Texas Pledge, and the song “Texas Our Texas”. Students also study about how the leaders of the Republic of Texas addressed the economic and social issues facing the new republic. Students also learn about the annexation of Texas to the United States and subsequent war with Mexico. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by acquiring information from various sources. The social studies skill TEKS 4.21A included in this unit supports the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students study about Texas in the mid1800s, including during the Civil War and Reconstruction.


Societies utilize institutions to promote order, security, and stability.

  • How do societies act to ensure the well-being of their people?

Competition for power over territory, resources, and people leads to tension and conflict.

  • Why have societies not been successful at avoiding conflict?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

After gaining independence from Mexico, Texans established a constitutional republic similar to that of the United States.

  • What is the purpose of the Texas Constitution?
  • What are the functions of the three branches of government in Texas?
  • What is significant about the Texas Pledge and the song “Texas Our Texas”?

Political Patterns

  • Governmental Systems

Civic Engagement

  • Law, Rules, Political Processes
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Leaders of the Texas Republic worked to address financial problems and provide protection for Texans.

  • How did the leaders of the Republic of Texas successfully address the problems faced by the new nation?
  • What roles did José Antonio Navarro, Sam Houston, Mirabeau Lamar, and Anson Jones take on in the new Republic of Texas?

Civic Engagement

  • Laws, Rules, Political Processes

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The annexation of Texas caused a boundary dispute between the United States and Mexico that was eventually resolved after a war between the United States and Mexico.

  • Why did some people support annexation of Texas to the United States and why did some not support annexation?
  • Why did the United States and Mexico go to war in 1846?
  • How did the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo affect Texas and the United States?

Historical Processes

  • Conflict/Cooperation

Spatial Patterns

  • Region/Borders
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None identified

Unit Vocabulary

constitutional republic – political system in which representatives are responsible for governing based on a written document outlining the structure and functions of the government
annexation – the process of adding land to an existing territory
cession – give up something; generally refers to formally giving up land

Related Vocabulary

  • Manifest Destiny
  •  treaty
 
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
4 History.
4.3 History. The student understands the importance of the Texas Revolution, the Republic of Texas, and the annexation of Texas to the United States. The student is expected to:
4.3C Identify leaders important to the founding of Texas as a republic and state, including José Antonio Navarro, Sam Houston, Mirabeau Lamar, and Anson Jones.

Identify

LEADERS IMPORTANT TO THE FOUNDING OF TEXAS AS A REPUBLIC AND STATE

Including, but not limited to:

  • José Antonio Navarro
    • Navarro supported Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar
    • Led the Santa Fe Expedition to New Mexico
    • One of three Mexican signers of the Texas Declaration of Independence
    • Supported statehood and was the only person of Spanish descent at the Convention of 1845
    • Served two terms as a state legislator
  • Sam Houston
    • First and third president of the Republic of Texas
    • Only individual to ever serve as the governor of two states, a U.S. legislator from two states, president of an independent nation, and a field general.
    • Supported statehood
    • Tried to decrease debt
    • Reinstated the Texas Rangers
  • Mirabeau Lamar
    • Second president of the Republic of Texas
    • Did not support statehood
    • Increased the debt of the Republic of Texas funding conflicts with American Indian tribes and Mexico
    • Known as the Father of Texas Education because he set land aside for public schools
  • Anson Jones
    • Last president of the Republic of Texas
    • In charge of the handing over of Texas to the United States
4.3D Describe the successes, problems, and organizations of the Republic of Texas such as the establishment of a constitution, economic struggles, relations with American Indians, and the Texas Rangers.

Describe

SUCCESSES, PROBLEMS, AND ORGANIZATIONS OF THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Successes
    • Constitution written for the republic
    • Individual freedoms, such as free speech and freedom of religion were guaranteed in the Texas Constitution
    • Land set aside for creation of public schools
    • Selected state capital site
  • Problems - Economic struggles
    • Sam Houston did away with the army and other issues that increased the debt of Texas, but debt was always an issue for Texas until statehood
    • Houston issued money, but it increased inflation – Redbacks
    • Mirabeau Lamar doubled the debt because he authorized the acquisition of the Texas Navy and the cost of fighting the American Indian tribes and Mexico
  • Problems - Relations with American Indian tribes
    • Sam Houston signed treaties with the Cherokees
    • Mirabeau Lamar wanted to remove Indian tribes from Texas. He forced the Cherokees to Oklahoma.
    • Council House Fight – Comanche bands had been killing settlers and capturing children. The Comanche agreed to peace talks, but settlers thought captives would be returned. When Comanche leaders were prevented from leaving for not turning over the captives, fights broke out that resulted in both Indians and townspeople being killed.
    • Texas Rangers were reinstated by Houston after he dismissed the army. Texas Rangers were only used when needed. They mainly fought against Indians and during the Mexican War.
  • Organization of the Republic
    • Constitutional republic was established and modeled after the U.S. system with three branches and a bicameral legislature
4.3E Explain the events that led to the annexation of Texas to the United States, including the impact of the U.S.-Mexican War.

Explain

EVENTS THAT LED TO THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS TO THE UNITED STATES

Including, but not limited to:

  • American idea of manifest destiny – belief that the U.S. should stretch from the Atlantic to the Pacific fueled expansionist support.
  • Despite concerns by some Americans about adding a slave state to the Union, U.S. President James K. Polk supported annexation of Texas. Texas was plagued by debt and annexation to the United States would relieve the debt
  • Texas Congress voted to accept the offer of statehood  and Texas became a state on December 29, 1845
  • Annexation resulted in a boundary dispute with Mexico.  U.S. officials claimed the boundary of Texas was the Rio Grande and Mexico claimed it was the Nueces River. Eventually war between Mexico and the United States erupted.
  • Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the war and established the Rio Grande as the border between the United States and Mexico.
4 Geography.
4.6 Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
4.6A Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps.

Boundaries of Texas and the United States following war with MexicoApply

GEOGRAPHIC TOOLS TO CONSTRUCT AND INTERPRET MAPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Grid systems – a network of horizontal and vertical lines used to locate points on a map or a chart by means of coordinates
  • Legends – an explanatory list of the symbols appearing on a chart or map. Sometimes, this is called a key
  • Symbols – a symbol is something which stands for or suggests something else. It can be a visible sign of something which is intangible.
  • Scales – a scale indicates the relationship between the distances on a map, chart, or plan and the corresponding actual distances. Examples include “1 inch equals 1 mile.”
  • Compass rose – a compass rose is a circle or similar design which includes graduated degrees or quarter points and shows compass directions
  • Other elements of maps
    • Title
    • Date of map
    • Author of map
  • Suggested maps students could construct
    • Boundaries of Texas and the United States following war with Mexico

 

4.8 Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:
4.8B Describe and explain the location and distribution of various towns and cities in Texas, past and present.

Describe, Explain

LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF VARIOUS TOWNS AND CITIES IN TEXAS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Prior to 1845 most towns were located along waterways and in colonies established by empresarios, such as San Antonio, San Felipe, Nacogdoches, and Victoria.
  • During the early statehood of Texas cities such as San Antonio and Nacogdoches were already established as agricultural centers. Port cities such as Galveston, Houston, and Brownsville grew as economic centers.
4 Government.
4.15 Government. The student understands important ideas in historical documents of Texas and the United States. The student is expected to:
4.15A

Identify the purposes and explain the importance of the Texas Declaration of Independence, the Texas Constitution, and other documents such as the Meusebach-Comanche Treaty.

Identify, Explain

PURPOSES, IMPORTANCE OF DOCUMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Texas State Constitution - established form of government and laws for the State of Texas; patterned after the United States’ document
4.15B Identify and explain the basic functions of the three branches of government according to the Texas Constitution.

Identify, Explain

BASIC FUNCTIONS OF THE THREE BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT ACCORDING TO THE TEXAS CONSTITUTION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Executive – executes laws; led by governor
  • Legislative – make (legislate) laws; led by House of Representatives and Senate
  • Judicial – interprets laws led by Supreme Court
4 Citizenship.
4.16 Citizenship. The student understands important customs, symbols, and celebrations of Texas. The student is expected to:
4.16B Sing or recite "Texas, Our Texas".

Sing, Recite

“TEXAS, OUR TEXAS”

Including, but not limited to:

  • “Texas, Our Texas”
Verse 1
Texas, Our Texas! All hail the mighty State!
Texas, Our Texas! So wonderful so great!
Boldest and grandest, Withstanding ev'ry test;
O Empire wide and glorious, You stand supremely blest.

Chorus
God bless you Texas!
And keep you brave and strong,
That you may grow in power and worth,
Thro’out the ages long. 

Verse 2
Texas, O Texas! Your freeborn single star,
Sends out its radiance to nations near and far.
Emblem of Freedom! It set our hearts aglow,
With thoughts of San Jacinto and glorious Alamo.

Chorus

Verse 3
Texas, dear Texas! From tyrant grip now free,
Shines forth in splendor, your star of destiny!
Mother of heroes!  We come your children true,
Proclaiming our allegiance, our faith, our love for you.

Chorus
4.16C Recite and explain the meaning of the Pledge to the Texas Flag.

Recite, Explain

MEANING OF THE PLEDGE TO THE TEXAS FLAG

Including, but not limited to:

  • "Honor the Texas flag; I pledge allegiance to thee, Texas, one state under God, one and indivisible."
  • A pledge is said to proclaim loyalty
4.17 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of active individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:
4.17D

Identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals.

Identify

IMPORTANCE OF HISTORICAL FIGURES AND IMPORTANT INDIVIDUALS WHO MODELED ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sam Houston
    • Military Leader during the Texas Revolution
    • Two time President of the Republic of Texas
    • Governor of Texas
    • Senator of Texas
  • Lorenzo de Zavala
    • Helped write the Texas Declaration of Independence
    • Helped design the ad interim government at Washington-on-the Brazos
    • Elected Vice President of the new republic
4 Social studies skills.
4.21 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
4.21A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computer software
  • Interviews
  • Biographies
  • Oral, print, and visual material
  • Documents
  • Artifacts
4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • By using skills of:
    • Sequencing
    • Categorizing
    • Identifying cause-and-effect relationship
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Finding the main idea
    • Summarizing
    • Making generalizations and predictions
    • Drawing inferences and conclusions
4.21C Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:
Information in:

  • Outlines
  • Reports
  • Databases
  • Visuals
    • Graphs
    • Charts
    • Timelines
    • Maps
4.22 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/24/2018
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