Hello, Guest!

Instructional Focus Document
Grade 4 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 09: Settling the Texas Frontier SUGGESTED DURATION : 15 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate to the settlement of the Texas frontier. In the latter half of the twentieth century the cattle industry in Texas flourished, while the agricultural sector also expanded. Many new innovations were introduced at this time, such as windmills that facilitated economic development in Texas. It was also during this time that railroads were built across Texas, facilitating further economic growth and the first moves towards urbanization in the state. Eventually the railroads and the enclosure of land, brought about by the invention of barbed wire, resulted in the closing of the Texas frontier. An examination of the development of the cattle industry and the expansion of the railroads is important for understanding the development of the Texas economy.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit students learned about mid nineteenth century immigration to Texas and the political, social, and economic changes in Texas that resulted from joining the Confederacy during the Civil War and later Reconstruction.

During this Unit

During this unit, students study about the development of the cattle industry in Texas, about the changing settlement patterns brought about by the expansion of railroads in Texas, and about how the settlement of the Texas frontier impacted the lives of American Indians and the environment in Texas.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students learn about early twentieth economic development and urbanization in Texas.


Adopting new ideas and innovations has unintended consequences.

  • Do new ideas and innovations improve the lives of people?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

After the Civil War the cattle industry in Texas expanded with large cattle drives and vast ranches.

  • How did the trail drives support the development of the cattle industry in Texas?
  • What was characteristic of cowboy culture?
  • How did the introduction of technologies such as windmills and barbed wire affect the development of the cattle industry in Texas?
  • How were Charles Goodnight, Richard King and Lizzie Johnson instrumental in the development of the cattle industry in Texas?

Economic Patterns

  • Resources
  • Factors of Production

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The expansion of railroads in Texas changed settlement patterns and promoted economic development.

What changes in settlement patterns resulted from the building of railroads in Texas?

How did the building of railroads in Texas affect economic development?

Spatial Patterns

  • Population Distribution

Scientific/Technological Patterns

  • Transportation
  • Infrastructure

Economic Patterns

  • Resources

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The settlement of the Texas frontier shaped the lives of American Indians and the environment of Texas.

  • How did the building of U.S. forts, the building of railroads, and the shortage of buffalo change the lives of American Indians in Texas?
  • What were the positive and negative consequences of these modifications of the environment?

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction
  • Population Distribution

Scientific/Technological Patterns

  • Transportation
  • Infrastructure
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None identified

Unit Vocabulary

cattle drive – the movement of large herds of cattle across open territory to be sold in markets in the North
industry – a collection of businesses that produce a similar good or service
reservations – an area of land set aside by the government for use by American Indian tribes
forts – a military complex of buildings where soldiers live

Related Vocabulary

  • barbed wire
  • transportation
  • migration
  •  communication
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

Show this message:

Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
4 History.
4.4 History. The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in Texas during the last half of the 19th century. The student is expected to:
4.4B Explain the growth, development, and impact of the cattle industry, including contributions made by Charles Goodnight, Richard King, and Lizzie Johnson.

Explain

GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT, AND IMPACT OF THE CATTLE INDUSTRY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Growth of cattle industry
    • Large Spanish ranches had been established along the border with Mexico, prior to the Civil War
    • Texas had a large supply of cattle after the Civil War and there was large demand for beef in the North.
  • Development of cattle industry
    • Land in West Texas that was not well-suited for agricultural purposes, was used for grazing cattle
    • Trail drives were developed to transport cattle to the railroads.
    • Charles Goodnight – founder of the Goodnight-Loving Trail along with Oliver Loving. It ran west into New Mexico and passed through Colorado.
  • Impact of cattle industry
    • A cowboy culture developed. Examples of famous cowboys included Daniel Webster, “80 John” Wallace, Bose Ikard, Oliver Loving, Charles Goodnight, and Maria del Carmen Cavillo.
    • Elizabeth “Lizzie” Johnson Williams – the first woman in Texas to ride the Chisholm Trail with a herd of cattle that she had acquired under her own brand.
    • Richard King – ranches were created across Texas. The King Ranch was the largest ranch in the world and was founded by Captain Richard King and his partner Mifflin Kenedy.
    • Diversified economy – farming and ranching
    • Growth of railroad
4.4C Identify the impact of railroads on life in Texas, including changes to cities and major industries.

Identify

IMPACT OF RAILROADS ON LIFE IN TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Cities – increased population; more cities were built along railroad lines
  • Industries – able to ship goods and agricultural products across the United States
4.4D Examine the effects upon American Indian life resulting from changes in Texas, including the Red River War, building of U.S. forts and railroads, and loss of buffalo.

Examine

EFFECTS ON AMERICAN INDIAN LIFE RESULTING FROM CHANGES IN TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Increased Conflicts
    • Red River Wars - with the shortage of buffalo, American Indian raiders left reservations and attacked settlements along the Red River. The Battle of Palo Duro Canyon resulted in a major rout of tribal forces. The U.S. Army forced the American Indian raiders back to the reservations and federal government forces maintained control of all of North Texas.
    • Forts were built to house and train soldiers to protect settlers moving west, which prompted war between American Indian tribes and U.S. forces.
  • Disruption of traditional American Indian culture
    • Seeking hides led hunters to drive the buffalo nearly to extinction making it difficult for American Indians to continue their way of life
    • Loss of buffalo forced the Plains tribes to move reservations and adapt a new way of life.
    • Building of railroads closed the frontier, which had once be home to several American Indian groups in Texas
4 Geography.
4.6 Geography. The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
4.6A Apply geographic tools, including grid systems, legends, symbols, scales, and compass roses, to construct and interpret maps.

Apply

GEOGRAPHIC TOOLS TO CONSTRUCT AND INTERPRET MAPS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Grid systems – a network of horizontal and vertical lines used to locate points on a map or a chart by means of coordinates
  • Legends – an explanatory list of the symbols appearing on a chart or map. Sometimes, this is called a key.
  • Symbols – a symbol is something which stands for or suggests something else. It can be a visible sign of something which is intangible.
  • Scales – a scale indicates the relationship between the distances on a map, chart, or plan and the corresponding actual distances. Examples include “1 inch equals 1 mile.”
  • Compass rose – a compass rose is a circle or similar design which includes graduated degrees or quarter points and shows compass directions
  • Other elements of maps
    • Title
    • Date of map
    • Author of map
  • Suggested maps students could construct
    • Cattle trails and railroads
4.6B Translate geographic data, population distribution, and natural resources into a variety of formats such as graphs and maps.

Translate

GEOGRAPHIC DATA, POPULATION DISTRIBUTION, AND NATURAL RESOURCES INTO A VARIETY OF FORMATS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Examples including - landforms, climate, distance, population numbers, demographics, location and quantities of natural resources
4.8 Geography. The student understands the location and patterns of settlement and the geographic factors that influence where people live. The student is expected to:
4.8A

Identify and explain clusters and patterns of settlement in Texas at different time periods such as prior to the Texas Revolution, after the building of the railroads, and following World War II.

Identify, Explain

CLUSTERS AND PATTERNS OF SETTLEMENT IN TEXAS AT DIFFERENT PERIODS

Including, but not limited to:

  • During the late 1800s the population of Texas continued to grow to more than 3 million by 1900. The building of railroads resulted in the birth of many towns along the rail routes and the growth of towns in West Texas. Most Texans still lived in rural settings, but urban areas were growing in size.
4.8B Describe and explain the location and distribution of various towns and cities in Texas, past and present.

Describe, Explain

LOCATION AND DISTRIBUTION OF VARIOUS TOWNS AND CITIES IN TEXAS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • After the Civil War, cities such as Fort Worth grew from its original establishment as a military fort where soldiers were stationed before going west to fight American Indians. Galveston and Houston continued to be important port cities. Cities such as Dallas, Amarillo, and El Paso grew with the expansion of the railroads.
4.9 Geography. The student understands how people adapt to and modify their environment. The student is expected to:
4.9A Describe ways people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as timber clearing, agricultural production, wetlands drainage, energy production, and construction of dams.

Describe

WAYS PEOPLE HAVE ADAPTED TO AND MODIFIED THEIR ENVIRONMENT IN TEXAS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Adapting to the environment almost always results in a modification of the environment. Humans have generally modified the environment in order to have shelter and food, access resources, protect against natural disasters, and transport people and goods.
  • In order to farm in some areas of Texas, timber needed to be cleared. Timber was also cut to use for building shelter.
  • The Texas frontier was modified by the building of railroads.
  • Windmills were introduced into western regions of Texas to allow for ranching in the arid climate.
  • Galveston Bay was dredged and sand used to elevate the city of Galveston to protect against tropical storms and hurricanes.
  • Wetlands around Houston have been drained to create stable land.
  • Bayous and wetlands were drained and redesigned to create the Port of Houston.
  • Dams have been built throughout the state, significantly along the Colorado River, to control flooding and to generate energy.
  • As Texas urbanized highways were built to meet growing transportation needs. .
  • Drilling for oil and the creating of windmill farms came about as a modification to meet the demand for energy.
4.9B Identify reasons why people have adapted to and modified their environment in Texas, past and present, such as the use of natural resources to meet basic needs, facilitate transportation, and enhance recreational activities.

Identify

REASONS PEOPLE HAVE ADAPTED TO AND MODIFIED THEIR ENVIRONMENT IN TEXAS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Using natural resources to meet basic needs
    • Lumber, stone, and adobe bricks used as building materials
    • Buckskin clothing was made from animal skins
    • Building dams for flood control and to generate hydro-electric power
  • Using resources to facilitate transportation
    • Settlers used rivers for transportation when possible. Rivers in Texas tend to be shallow and flood easily.
    • Railroads were used to transport people and goods.
  • Using natural resources to enhance recreational activities
    • Creating of reservoirs allowed for boating and water recreational activities
4.9C Compare the positive and negative consequences of human modification of the environment in Texas, past and present, both governmental and private, such as economic development and the impact on habitats and wildlife as well as air and water quality.

Compare

POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE CONSEQUENCES OF HUMAN MODIFICATION OF THE ENVIRONMENT, PAST AND PRESENT, BOTH GOVERNMENTAL AND PRIVATE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Positive consequences of human modifications of the environment
    • Dams have controlled flooding and provided hydro-electric energy and recreational reservoirs.
    • Development of oil/gas industry created jobs and faster transportation.
    • Development of alternative energy sources promotes economic growth and provides for the energy needs of a growing state.
    • Building of cattle trails, roads, and railroads facilitated trade between markets.
    • Fences used to close the open range, changed ranching practices.
    • Creating suburban and urban residential areas provides a property tax base to support education.
    • Planting trees and natural vegetation to prevent erosion.
  • Negative consequences of human modifications of the environment
    • Overhunting of buffalo resulted in the loss of a resource which supported American Indian tribes in Texas and altered lifestyles.
    • Establishment of wind farms has impeded migrating birds.
    • Oil spills threaten ecosystems. Possible seismic activity from hydraulic fracturing techniques used to extract oil.
    • Burning of fossil fuels contributes to pollution.
    • Building of roads and railroads contributed to urbanization which altered wildlife habitats and displaced animals and resulted in pollution of ecosystems. 
    • Creating suburban and urban residential areas increases demand for water.
4 Economics.
4.12 Economics. The student understands patterns of work and economic activities in Texas. The student is expected to:
4.12B Explain how geographic factors such as climate, transportation, and natural resources have influenced the location of economic activities in Texas.

Explain

HOW GEOGRAPHIC FACTORS HAVE INFLUENCED THE LOCATION OF ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES IN TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Decisions about the location of agricultural activities, manufacturing facilities, and businesses are affected by the climate, access to transportation, and the proximity of natural resources.
  • Favorable climate conditions influenced the development of major industries in Texas, where it is easier to produce year round and attractive for labor to relocate.
  • Throughout history, towns and large urban areas developed along railroad lines, as well as near rivers and ports which served as transportation routes.
  • Many industries, such as those related to oil and gas developed where those resources were discovered. Wind farms are located in prairie locations of Texas. Lumber industry developed in East Texas where forests are more abundant. Cattle ranching developed where the land was not arable and unsuitable for agricultural use.
4.12E Explain how developments in transportation and communication have influenced economic activities in Texas.

Explain

HOW DEVELOPMENTS IN TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION INFLUENCE ECONOMIC ACTIVITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Developments in transportation such as railroads, shipping channels, highway systems, and commercial aviation along with developments in communication such as, telegraph, telephone, and Internet help to move information, products, and people faster and more efficiently.

4 Science, technology, and society.
4.20 Science, technology, and society. The student understands the impact of science and technology on life in Texas. The student is expected to:
4.20A

Identify famous inventors and scientists such as Gail Borden, Joseph Glidden, Michael DeBakey, and Millie Hughes-Fulford and their contributions.

Identify

FAMOUS INVENTORS AND SCIENTISTS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Gail Borden (1801–1874) publisher, surveyor, inventor, and founder of the Borden Company.
    • Was a delegate at the Convention of 1833 where he assisted in writing early drafts of a Texas Constitution. Published the Telegraph and Texas Register newspaper; printing the first edition a few days after the Texas Revolution began. Mexican soldiers raided the newspaper and threw the press into Buffalo Bayou just before the Texas Revolution ended.
    • Later became the first collector of the Port of Galveston under the Republic of Texas and helped lay out the plan for the city of Houston.
    • After his wife died of yellow fever, Borden began experimenting to find a cure for the disease using refrigeration, but was unsuccessful. Later he focused on a condensed beef-broth and flour mixture, the beef biscuit, which did not succeed. While working on the beef biscuit, he devised a process for condensing milk through a vacuum process. This long-lasting condensed milk was a success and the beginning of canned and processed foods.
  •  Joseph Glidden (1813–1906)
    • Invented most successful form of barbed wire, which he patented in 1874
4 Social studies skills.
4.21 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
4.21A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computer software
  • Interviews
  • Biographies
  • Oral, print, and visual material
  • Documents
  • Artifacts
4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • By using skills of:
    • Sequencing
    • Categorizing
    • Identifying cause-and-effect relationship
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Finding the main idea
    • Summarizing
    • Making generalizations and predictions
    • Drawing inferences and conclusions
4.21C Organize and interpret information in outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Information in:
    • Outlines
    • Reports
    • Databases
    • Visuals
      • Graphs
      • Charts
      • Timelines
      • Maps
4.22 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/24/2018
Loading
Data is Loading...