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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 4 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 12: Texans Making a Difference SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate to the civic and cultural engagement of Texans. Throughout the latter half of the twentieth century Texans have served as national leaders including two U.S. presidents from Texas. Texans have a civic duty to engage in the political process and Texans continue to make a difference in their communities and state through various civic programs. Texas has long been the home to various immigrant groups and in the latter half of the twentieth century immigrants continued to come to Texas, many to Houston making it one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the United States. An examination of engagement in the political process, civic affairs, and cultural traditions is important for understanding the expectations of citizens in Texas and contributions made by citizens in Texas.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit students learned about the globalization of the Texas economy in the latter half of the twentieth century. 

During this Unit

During this final unit of study, students study about being actively engaged in the political process and civic affairs in Texas. Students specifically learn about participation in the democratic process, how to contact political leaders, and about being involved in civic organizations.  Additionally students learn about the cultural patterns of Texas and the contributions of various diverse groups to that unique culture. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by acquiring information from various sources. The social studies skill TEKS 4.21A included in this unit supports the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.


Civically engaged citizens take informed action to improve the quality of life in the community.

  • What are the ways to effectively bring about change?

Culture serves to unify people.

  • What commonalities binds people together as a group?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Texans make a difference by actively engaging in the political process and civic affairs.

  • How have past political and community leaders in Texas participated in the democratic process?
  • Who are the current political leaders in Texas?
  • How can you contact your political leaders?
  • How can you become involved in the political process or involved in civic affairs?

Civic Engagement

  • Laws, Rules, Political Process
  • Civic Institutions

Cultural Patterns

  • Community
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Many diverse individuals and groups have contributed to the unique culture in Texas.

  • Why do people continue to migrate to Texas?
  • In what ways have Texans distinguished themselves as famous firsts?
  • How have Texans contributed to the arts?
  • What cultural celebrations reflect the traditions of the many groups that have settled in Texas?

Cultural Patterns

  • Community
  • Ethnicity
  • Artistic expressions

Spatial Patterns

  • Migration

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • None identified

Unit Vocabulary

civic affairs – issues related to being an involve citizen in the community
political process – the method of selecting and interacting with political candidates and leaders
election – event held to allow citizens to vote for leaders
culture – the behaviors and beliefs characteristic of a particular group

Related Vocabulary

  •  tradition
   
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
4 History.
4.5 History. The student understands important issues, events, and individuals of the 20th century in Texas. The student is expected to:
4.5C

Identify the accomplishments of notable individuals such as John Tower, Scott Joplin, Audie Murphy, Cleto Rodríguez, Stanley Marcus, Bessie Coleman, Raul A. Gonzalez Jr., and other local notable individuals.

Identify

ACCOMPLISHMENTS OF NOTABLE INDIVIDUALS

Including, but not limited to:

  • John Tower – first Republican U.S. Senator from Texas since Reconstruction
  • Scott Joplin – known as the “King of Ragtime,” it would take over fifty years for his ragtime music to become famous. (The song “The Entertainer” was the theme song for Oscar-winning movie The Sting.)
  • Bessie Coleman – raised in Texas, Bessie Coleman was the first female pilot of African American descent and the first person of African American descent to hold an international pilot license.
  • Raul A. Gonzales Jr. – the first Latino Texan to reach statewide office and the first to serve as a Justice of the Texas Supreme Court
  • Other notable local individuals
4 Citizenship.
4.17 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of active individual participation in the democratic process. The student is expected to:
4.17A Identify important individuals who have participated voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels such as Adina de Zavala and Clara Driscoll.

Identify

IMPORTANT INDIVIDUALS WHO HAVE PARTICIPATED VOLUNTARILY IN CIVIC AFFAIRS AT STATE AND LOCAL LEVELS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Adina de Zavala
    • San Antonio teacher and historian who led the fight to preserve Texas historical sites like the Alamo and four Franciscan missions as well as the Spanish Governor’s Palace; encouraged education on Texas heritage and supported statewide preservation efforts
    • Encouraged statewide recognition of March 2, Texas Independence Day
    • Suggested that Texas schools be named after Texas heroes
    • Facilitated in the marking of almost 40 major sites as places of historical significance
  • Clara Driscoll
    • Known as the “Savior of the Alamo”, business women and philanthropist who was responsible for the preservation of the Alamo as a landmark
    • 1903 – working with the Daughters of the Texas Revolution, negotiated the purchase of the long barracks at the Alamo
    • 1905 – the state awarded responsibility to care for the Alamo to the Daughters of the Republic of Texas.
    • 2011 – passage of House Bill 3726 transferred responsibility for the upkeep of the Alamo to the Texas General Land Office.
4.17B Explain how individuals can participate voluntarily in civic affairs at state and local levels through activities such as holding public officials to their word, writing letters, and participating in historic preservation and service projects.

Explain

HOW INDIVIDUALS CAN PARTICIPATE VOLUNTARILY IN CIVIC AFFAIRS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Holding public officials accountable through letters/e-mails
  • Participating in historic preservation and service projects by donating money and volunteering time organizing or being a docent
  • Campaign for candidates
  • Work as part of polling staff for local and state elections
  • Working for nonprofit agencies
  • Donating time or money to civic causes, such as food banks and  human society
  • Placing American flags out in neighborhood yards for patriotic holidays
4.17C Explain the duty of the individual in state and local elections such as being informed and voting.

Explain

DUTY OF THE INDIVIDUAL IN STATE AND LOCAL ELECTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Being informed about candidates and elected position
  • Vote in elections
  • Run for office
  • Volunteer at polling locations
4.17D Identify the importance of historical figures and important individuals who modeled active participation in the democratic process such as Sam Houston, Barbara Jordan, Lorenzo de Zavala, Ann Richards, Sam Rayburn, Henry B. González, James A. Baker III, Wallace Jefferson, and other local individuals.

Identify

IMPORTANCE OF HISTORICAL FIGURES AND IMPORTANT INDIVIDUALS WHO MODELED ACTIVE PARTICIPATION IN THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sam Houston
    • Military leader during the Texas Revolution
    • Two-time President of the Republic of Texas
    • Governor of Texas
    • Senator of Texas
  • Barbara Jordan
    • First African American to serve in the state senate in a century and first African American woman from the South ever to serve in the U.S. Congress
  • Lorenzo de Zavala
    • Helped write the Texas Declaration of Independence
    • Helped design the ad interim government at Washington-on-the Brazos
    • Elected Vice President of the new republic
  • Ann Richards
    • Second female governor of Texas
    • Remembered for adding diversity to state government, creating a lottery, and fighting corruption
  • Sam Rayburn
    • Served as the Speaker of the Texas House in 1911
    • Served as a U.S. Representative from 1912 until his death in 1961
    • Served as U.S. Speaker of the House for 17 years, longer than any other speaker
  • Henry B. González
    • U.S. Congressman who fought for equality in health care, housing, and justice for all
  • James A. Baker III
    • Served as the Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagan's first administration and in the final year of the administration of President George H. W. Bush
    • Served as Secretary of the Treasury from 1985-1988 in the second Reagan administration
    • Secretary of State in the George H. W. Bush administration
    • The James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University in Houston, Texas, is named for him
  • Wallace Jefferson
    • First African American who served as Justice of the Texas Supreme Court in 2002 and 2004
  • Local individuals
4.17E Explain how to contact elected and appointed leaders in state and local governments.

Explain

HOW TO CONTACT ELECTED AND APPOINTED LEADERS IN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Write letters; e-mails; phone calls; social networks (Twitter, etc.)
  • Websites
4.18 Citizenship. The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:
4.18A Identify leaders in state, local, and national governments, including the governor, local members of the Texas Legislature, the local mayor, U.S. senators, local U.S. representatives, and Texans who have been president of the United States.

Identify

LEADERS IN GOVERNMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • State government
    • Governor:  Greg Abbott - Republican
    • Local members of the Texas Legislature
    • Local mayor
  • National government
    • U.S. Senators
      • Ted Cruz (Republican)
      • John Cornyn (Republican)
  • Texans who have been President of the United States
    • Lyndon B. Johnson (Democrat)
    • George H.W. Bush (Republican)
    • George W. Bush (Republican)
    • Dwight D. Eisenhower (Republican) – born in Denison, Texas but considered Kansas his home
4.18B Identify leadership qualities of state and local leaders, past and present.

Identify

LEADERSHIP QUALITIES OF STATE AND LOCAL LEADERS, PAST AND PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Intelligent
  • Wise
  • Courageous
  • Brave
  • Self-sacrificing
  • Aware of different cultures of the world
4 Culture.
4.19 Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas. The student is expected to:
4.19A Identify the similarities and differences among various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in Texas.

Identify

SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES AMONG RACIAL, ETHNIC, AND RELIGIOUS GROUPS IN TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Similarities
    • Maintained culture through celebrations, food, music, and language
    • Came to Texas for economic opportunities and freedom
  • Differences
    • Reasons for migration to Texas
    • Came from Europe, Mexico, Asia, and the United States
4.19B Identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various cultural, regional, and local groups in Texas such as Cinco de Mayo, Oktoberfest, the Strawberry Festival, and Fiesta San Antonio.

Identify

CUSTOMS, CELEBRATIONS, TRADITIONS OF CULTURAL, REGIONAL, LOCAL GROUPS IN TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Cinco de Mayo
    • May 5th
    • Very popular in U.S. cities and towns with large Mexican populations; not as popular in Mexico
    • Commemorates the Mexican victory over the French army at the Battle of Puebla in 1862
    • Mexican culture celebrated with food, entertainment, and beverages  
  • Oktoberfest
    • Celebration of German heritage in towns and cities that have large German populations in the fall
    • German culture celebrated with food, entertainment, and beverages
    • Celebrated at various times from late September through November
  • Strawberry Festival
    • Celebrated in April in Poteet
    • Celebrates the harvest of strawberries grown in Poteet
  • Fiesta San Antonio
    • Celebrates the cultural diversity of San Antonio each April
    • Started in 1891 with parades, entertainments, parties, and food
4.19C Summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the development of Texas such as Lydia Mendoza, Chelo Silva, and Julius Lorenzo Cobb Bledsoe.

Summarize

CONTRIBUTIONS OF PEOPLE OF VARIOUS RACIAL, ETHNIC, AND RELIGIOUS GROUPS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Lydia Mendoza
    • “Lark of the Border”
    • First to record Tejano and Norteno music during the 1940s and 1950s
    • Received the National Medal of Arts in 1999
    • Born in Houston
  • Chelo Silva
    • “Queen of the Bolero”
    • Reigned over Tejano music scene with her romantic ballads and passionate performances in 1940s and into the 1960s
    • Born in Brownsville
    • Most well-known of the female Spanish-language singers reaching outside the United States and into Latin America
  • Julius Lorenzo Cobb Bledsoe
    • Born in Waco
    • Praised for his ability to sing in several languages and for his vocal control
    • His role as "Joe" in Jerome Kern's Showboat made the song "Ol' Man River" an American classic
4 Social studies skills.
4.21 Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
4.21A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as computer software; interviews; biographies; oral, print, and visual material; documents; and artifacts to acquire information about the United States and Texas.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT THE UNITED STATES AND TEXAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Computer software
  • Interviews
  • Biographies
  • Oral, print, and visual material
  • Documents
  • Artifacts
4.21B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • By using skills of:
    • Sequencing
    • Categorizing
    • Identifying cause-and-effect relationship
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Finding the main idea
    • Summarizing
    • Making generalizations and predictions
    • Drawing inferences and conclusions
4.22 Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
4.22B Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication.

Incorporate

MAIN AND SUPPORTING IDEAS

Including, but not limited to:

  • In verbal communication
  • In written communication
4.22D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 05/24/2018
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