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Instructional Focus Document
Economics with Emphasis on the Free Enterprise System and Its Benefits
TITLE : Unit 05: Personal Financial Decisions SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address personal financial decisions. This unit is primarily a study of personal finance. Economics at a basic level is a study in choices made in relation to limited resources. It is important for students to understand that personal economic choices affect economic well-being. Informed citizens understand the connection between personal financial decisions and wealth creation,

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students studied about how public policies of the Federal Reserve System and the government affect the economy.

During this Unit

During this unit, students complete the course learning about consumer finance, investing, budgeting, credit, home ownership, and the costs of post-secondary education in the context of making personal financial decisions.


In a free enterprise system the individual has choices as a producer and consumer.

  • What motivates the economic choices of the individual?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Financial institutions offer a variety of accounts to facilitate money management.

  • What types of functions do financial institutions serve?
  • What types of accounts are available to consumers from financial institutions?
  • What are the risks and benefits of having accounts with a financial institution?
  • How do you reconcile a bank statement and maintain a checking account?

Economic Patterns

  • Scarcity/Choices
  • Resources
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Budgeting is an important money management tool and investing is fundamental for wealth accumulation.

  • How does one begin a savings plan and an investment plan?
  • What are the costs and benefits of investing in the stock market?
  • What investment options are available to plan for retirement?
  • Why would buying insurance or giving to a charity be included in a budget?

Economic Patterns

  • Scarcity/Choices
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

There are costs and benefits to using credit and borrowing money.

  • What types of loans are available to consumers?
  • What are the costs, benefits and responsibilities associated with borrowing?
  • How can consumers avoid and eliminate credit card debt?
  • What are the costs and benefits of declaring personal bankruptcy?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Purchasing a home is important financial decision.

  • What are the costs and benefits of renting compared to the costs and benefits of home ownership?
  • What financial conditions are necessary in order to become a home owner?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Planning for the costs of post-secondary education is necessary.

  • Why is the FAFSA form important to complete?
  • What options are available to pay for post-secondary education?
  • What are the advantages and disadvantage of private and federal student loans?
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Most students do not really understand how credit cards work and they especially do not associate credit cards with compounded interest.

Unit Vocabulary

investment – providing money or capital to an enterprise with the expectation of making a financial gain
compound interest – interest which is calculated on the initial principle and on the accumulated interest
credit score – a number based on an individual’s credit history that indicates how much of a credit risk he may be
risk/return relationship – the relationship between the risk of an investment and the expected return of the investment
interest –  a payment made for the use of borrowing money
open end credit –  a line of credit that can be used repeatedly, within an established borrowing limit
closed end credit – a loan for a set amount that requires regular payments at certain intervals
secured loans – a loan that is obtained by offering an asset as collateral to ensure repayment of the loan
unsecured loans – a loan that is obtained without the use of collateral
budget – an itemized plan of income and expenses for a given period of time

Related Vocabulary

  • diversification
  • income
  • expenditure
  • debt
  • grants
  • bankruptcy
  • dividend
  • collateral
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
NewE.16 The student understands the role of financial markets/institutions in saving, borrowing, and capital formation. The student is expected to:
NewE.16A Explain the functions of financial institutions and how they affect households and businesses.

Explain

FUNCTIONS OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND HOW THEY AFFECT HOUSEHOLDS AND BUSINESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Financial institutions act as intermediaries between savers and borrowers. They offer a convenient and safe way for people to store money, and with depositors’ funds, they provide commercial loans, personal loans, mortgages, and issue credit cards.
  • Enable households and businesses to earn a return on their savings, while providing necessary funds for businesses to use for capital investment
  • Provide loans, so families and businesses can purchase what they need
NewE.16B Explain how the amount of savings in an economy is the basis of capital formation.

Explain

HOW THE AMOUNT OF SAVINGS IN AN ECONOMY IS THE BASIS OF CAPITAL FORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Capital formation–expansion of capital or capital goods, through savings or through investment. More money in savings leads to more resources for business investment, rather than individual consumption
NewE.16C Analyze the role of interest and risk in allocating savings to its most productive use.

Analyze

THE ROLE OF INTEREST AND RISK IN ALLOCATING SAVINGS TO ITS MOST PRODUCTIVE USE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Role of interest – the higher the interest rate offered for savings, the more money will be available for savings; the lowering the interest rate lowers the amount of money available for saving
  • Role of risk – the higher the risk, the higher the interest
NewE.16D Examine the types of accounts available to consumers from financial institutions and the risks, monetary costs, and benefits of maintaining these accounts.

Examine

TYPES OF ACCOUNTS AVAILABLE TO CONSUMERS FROM FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND THE RISKS, MONETARY COSTS, AND BENEFITS OF MAINTAINING THESE ACCOUNTS

Including, but not limited to:

 
Risks
Costs
Benefits
Checking accounts insured fees (lower, or none with minimum balance)
don't have to carry cash
Savings accounts insured makes your money less accessible
earn interest
Cetificates of deposits insured money tied up for a period of time, penalty for withdrawal
earn higher interest
Money Market funds insured lower interest than CDs
higher interest than savings, no time frame
IRA accounts insured rules and penalties for early withdrawal
tax advantages
Mutal funds not insured fees, can lose money, taxable safer than stocks, experts choose the companies
NewE.17 The student understands the role of individuals in financial markets. The student is expected to:
NewE.17A Assess ways to be a wise investor in the stock market and in other personal investment options such as developing a personal retirement plan.

Assess

WAYS TO BE A WISE INVESTOR IN THE STOCK MARKET AND IN OTHER PERSONAL INVESTMENT OPTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify and distinguish ways that an investment can grow over time
    • Interest income
    • Dividend income
    • Rising market price
  • Identify and distinguish types of risk to money invested in a potentially wealth-building asset
    • Risk of decline in value – the company whose stock is purchased may realize lower-than-expected earnings or fall short of projected growth, causing the market price of its shares to drop.
    • Risk of lost purchasing power – if savings do not grow at least as fast as the rate of inflation, the saver loses purchasing power.
    • Risk of failure or default – the issuer of a corporate bond could fail to repay the original amount, leading to complete loss of the investment.
    • Risk of illiquidity – savings placed in an inaccessible or illiquid form of investment may not be easily convertible into cash if needed unexpectedly.
  • Identify factors that will help determine an investor’s tolerance for risk, including:
    • Overall net worth
    • Age (distance to retirement)
    • Family responsibilities
    • Earnings power
  • Explain and illustrate the concept of diversification, and planning for personal retirement
NewE.17B Explain how to begin a savings program.

Explain

HOW TO BEGIN A SAVINGS PROGRAM

Including, but not limited to:

  • Set goals
  • Study income and expenditures compared to goals
  • Investigate investment opportunities
  • Set a plan to achieve goals
NewE.17C Demonstrate how to maintain a checking account, including reconciling a bank statement.

Demonstrate

HOW TO MAINTAIN A CHECKING ACCOUNT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Balancing a checkbook entails
    • Enter starting balance for the month
    • Record in the “Payment or Withdrawal” column any transaction that removes money from your account, including: (a) checks written; (b) ATM withdrawals; (c) teller withdrawals at the bank; (d) electronic transfers made (such as automatic payment of monthly bills); and (e) fees charged by the bank
    • Record in the “Deposit or Interest” column any transaction that adds money to the account, including deposits made and interest paid by the bank
    • Add everything from the “Deposit or Interest” column to the starting balance, then subtract everything from the “Payment or Withdrawal” column
    • Reconciling a bank statement by comparing an account balance against a monthly statement.
NewE.17D Identify the types of loans available to consumers.

Identify

TYPES OF LOANS AVAILABLE TO CONSUMERS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Open-end credit – a line of credit that can be used repeatedly, within an established borrowing limit. (e.g., credit card, home-equity line of credit) Finance charges apply to the unpaid balance.
  • Closed-end credit – a loan for a set amount that requires regular payments at certain intervals. (e.g., vehicle loan, student loan, mortgage) Finance charges are agreed upon at the start of the loan.
  • Secured loans – a loan that is obtained by offering an asset as collateral to ensure repayment of the loan. Default on the loan results in loss of the asset. (e.g., vehicle loan, mortgage)
  • Unsecured loans – a loan that is obtained without the use of collateral. Default results in collections and possible lawsuit. (e.g., payday loans, student loans, credit cards)
NewE.17E Explain the responsibilities and obligations of borrowing money.

Explain

RESPONSIBILITIES AND OBLIGATIONS OF BORROWING MONEY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Responsibilities and obligations – have to research terms (amount borrowed, interest rate, term, payment schedule, total payments) offered to get best deal; have to make payments according to schedule
NewE.17F Develop strategies to become a low-risk borrower by improving and understanding one's personal credit score.

Develop

STRATEGIES TO BECOME A LOW-RISK BORROWER BY IMPROVING AND UNDERSTANDING ONE'S PERSONAL CREDIT SCORE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Pay bills on time
  • Keep credit card balances low
  • Keep unused accounts open
  • Only apply for credit when needed
  • Shop around for best rates
  • Correct inaccuracies on credit report
  • Avoid excess credit inquiries
  • Avoid bankruptcy
  • Avoid consolidating balances
  • Negotiate with creditors
NewE.18 The student applies critical-thinking skills to analyze the costs and benefits of personal financial decisions. The student is expected to:
NewE.18A Examine ways to avoid and eliminate credit card debt.

Examine

WAYS TO AVOID AND ELIMINATE CREDIT CARD DEBT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Avoid credit card debt – buy what you can afford. Pay off any credit purchases each month to avoid fees and interest charges. If charges carryover to next month, pay more than the minimum.
  • Eliminate credit card debt – stop using credit cards. Pay more than the minimum. Do the math and lay out a plan. Stick to the plan’s budget.
NewE.18B Evaluate the costs and benefits of declaring personal bankruptcy.

Evaluate

COSTS AND BENEFITS OF DECLARING PERSONAL BANKRUPTCY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Costs
    • Huge drop in credit score
    • Effects on record for 7-10 years
    • Automatic rejection for future credit
    • Still have to repay part of debt
    • Secured debt (mortgage, car) not discharged in bankruptcy
    • Could lose personal property
    • Could affect future employment, housing
    • Fees for attorneys, trustee, court
  • Benefits
    • Can help with problems arising from sudden or unexpected catastrophe
    • Can lower payments
    • Can stop collection effort
NewE.18C Evaluate the costs and benefits of buying insurance.

Evaluate

COSTS AND BENEFITS OF BUYING INSURANCE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Costs
    • Money out of pocket
    • Might not need it or use it
    • Difficulty of comparing plans
  • Benefits
    • Legal requirements (e.g., auto insurance)
    • Coverage of unexpected expenses
    • Some plans build equity to borrow against
    • Possible tax credit to cover insurance premium
NewE.18D Evaluate the costs and benefits of charitable giving.

Evaluate

COSTS AND BENEFITS OF CHARITABLE GIVING

Including, but not limited to:

  • Costs
    • Money out of pocket
    • Time
  • Benefits
    • Tax deductions
    • Helping society
    • Feel good
NewE.19 The student understands how to provide for basic needs while living within a budget. The student is expected to:
NewE.19A Evaluate the costs and benefits of renting a home versus buying a home.

Evaluate

COSTS AND BENEFITS OF RENTING A HOME

Including, but not limited to:

  • Costs of renting
    • Abiding by requirements of the lease
    • Opportunity cost of not building equity from property ownership
    • Subject to possible rent increases
  • Benefits of renting
    • Maintenance and upkeep costs are responsibility of the landlord
    • Easier mobility in terms of relocation
    • Payment of property taxes is indirect
  • Costs of buying a home
    • Large capital outlay to obtain a loan
    • Obligations to pay property taxes and insurance
    • Long term economic commitment to repay a mortgage
    • Costs of repairs and maintenance
    • Potential homeowner association fees
  • Benefits of buying a home
    • Potential to accumulate equity and capital gains at the time of sale
    • Tax deductions for mortgage interest and property taxes
    • Ability to customize the property to owner likes and needs
NewE.19B Assess the financial aspects of making the transition from renting to home ownership.

Assess

FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF MAKING THE TRANSITION FROM RENTING TO HOME OWNERSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Compare the benefits of renting and owning; consider situations when owning or renting could be appropriate (e.g., long term v. short term housing needs; market conditions)
  • Monetary requirements for owning a home; plan to achieve requirements, including savings plan
  • Personal net worth – assets minus liabilities; net worth changes over time
NewE.20 The student understands the various methods available to pay for college and other postsecondary education and training. The student is expected to:
NewE.20A Understand how to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) provided by the United States Department of Education.

Understand

HOW TO COMPLETE THE FREE APPLICATION FOR FEDERAL STUDENT AID (FAFSA) PROVIDED BY THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

NewE.20B Research and evaluate various scholarship opportunities such as those from state governments, schools, employers, individuals, private companies, nonprofits, and professional organizations.

Research, Evaluate

SCHOLARSHIP OPPORTUNITIES FROM A VARIETY OF SOURCES

NewE.20C Analyze and compare student grant options.

Analyze, Compare

STUDENT GRANT OPTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Federal Pell Grants
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
  • Teacher Education Assistance for College and Higher Education Grants
  • Iraq and Afghanistan Service Grants
NewE.20D Analyze and compare student loan options, including private and federal loans.

Analyze, Compare

STUDENT LOAN OPTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Private loans
  • Federal loans
  • Subsidized loans – the Department of Education covers the cost of interest accrued while enrolled in school
  • Unsubsidized loans – the borrower is responsible for the interest which accrues from the time of the origination of the loan
NewE.20E Research and evaluate various work-study program opportunities.

Research, Evaluate

WORK-STUDY PROGRAM OPPORTUNITIES

  • Awarded to students who demonstrate financial need. Provides part time employment at no lower than the federal minimum wage.
NewE.21 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewE.21A Analyze economic information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
NewE.22 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
NewE.22A Use social studies terminology correctly.

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY

NewE.22B Create written, oral, and visual presentations of economic information using effective communication skills, including proper citations and avoiding plagiarism.

Create

PRESENTATIONS OF ECONOMIC INFORMATION USING EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Written, oral, visual presentations
  • Effective Communication Skills
    • Correct grammar and punctuation
    • Accurate spelling
    • Clear diction and sentence structure
    • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
TEKS# SE# Unit Level Developing TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
NewE.21 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewE.21B Create economic models, including production-possibilities curves, circular-flow charts, and supply-and-demand graphs, to analyze economic concepts or issues.

Create

ECONOMIC MODELS TO ANALYZE ECONOMIC CONCEPTS OR ISSUES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Production-possibilities curves
  • Circular-flow charts
  • Supply-and-demand graphs
NewE.21C Explain a point of view on an economic issue.

Explain

POINT OF VIEW

  • Point of view refers to the perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses
NewE.21D Analyze and evaluate the validity of economic information from primary and secondary sources for bias, propaganda, point of view, and frame of reference.

Analyze, Evaluate

VALIDITY OF ECONOMIC INFORMATION FROM PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Bias refers to a favoritism towards one way of thinking. All individuals exhibit bias, of which they may or may not be consciously aware.
  • Propaganda refers to information that is intended to promote a particular position, claim, or point of view; may include misleading information
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses in a document.
  • Frame of reference refers to a particular set of ideas/beliefs which influences an individual’s judgements; in historical analysis relates to the conditions the individual experienced that influences his/her points of view
NewE.21E Evaluate economic data using charts, tables, graphs, and maps.

Evaluate

ECONOMIC DATA

NewE.23 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
NewE.23A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/19/2019
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