Hello, Guest!

Instructional Focus Document
United States Government
TITLE : Unit 05: Governmental Policies: Establishing Justice and Promoting the General Welfare SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that relate to governmental policy decision making. This unit is primarily a study of public policy. As a large bureaucracy the U.S. government implements domestic and foreign policies intended to address the political, economic, and social conditions of the time. An examination of these policies is important for understanding how stability and security is provided to the American people.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students studied about the structure and functions of the three branches of government.

During this Unit

During this unit, students learn about the role of the government in the economy of the United States, about the development of foreign policy, and about how court decisions affect cultural change in the United States. Additionally, students continue to practice inquiry skills by acquiring information from various sources, identifying multiple viewpoints in sources, and evaluating sources for bias and validity. All social studies skills expectations are included in this unit to support the inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit, students study about participation in the political process.


Societies utilize institutions to promote order, security, and stability.

  • How do societies act to ensure the well-being of their people?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

While the role of the government in a free enterprise system is limited, governmental policies in the United States related to taxation, regulation, monetary policy, and fiscal policy affect the economy.

  • What are the major sources of revenue for the Unites States?
  • What are the major expenditures of the U.S. government?
  • How is the economy affected by fiscal and monetary policies?
  • How is the economy impacted by regulatory policies?
  • How is the federal budget created?
  • How has the U.S. patent system foster economic growth?
  • In what ways does governmental assisted research impact the economy in the United States?

Economic Patterns

  • Monetary/Fiscal Policies
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

U.S. foreign policy is primarily focused on economic and military relationships with other regions.

  • What regions of the world are important global locations for the United States?
  • How does U.S. foreign policy affect other regions?
  • What economic policies does the United States use in its foreign policy?
  • What is characteristic of international trade policies in the United States?

Economic Patterns

  • Trade
  • Competition
  • Globalization
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Governmental legislation, policies, and court decisions have facilitated cultural changes in the United States.

  • What government policies have been responsible for large cultural changes in the United States?
  • In what ways have major court decisions brought about cultural changes in the United States?
  • How does judicial activism and judicial restraint relate to cultural changes in the United States?

Cultural Patterns

  • Prejudice and Discrimination

Historical Processes

  • Change/Continuity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students have a difficult time distinguishing between the federal legislature and the state legislature.

Unit Vocabulary

policy – actions or procedures approved by the government
revenue – income raised by the government
expenditure – costs incurred by the government
regulations – standards and rules set by the government
fiscal policy – government procedures that relate to spending and collection of revenue
monetary policy – government procedures that relate to the supply of money
foreign aid – monetary assistance given to other countries

Related Vocabulary

  • Federal Reserve
  • free enterprise
  • entrepreneurship
  • anti-trust
  • copyright
  • Affirmative Action
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

Show this message:

Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
NewG.4 The student understands the roles played by local, state, and national governments in both the public and private sectors of the U.S. free enterprise system. The student is expected to:
NewG.4A Explain how government fiscal, and regulatory policies influence the economy at the local, state, and national levels.

Explain

HOW GOVERNMENT FISCAL, MONETARY, AND REGULATORY POLICIES INFLUENCE THE ECONOMY AT THE LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL LEVELS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Fiscal policy – Spending and revenue collection to influence the economy. These policies are used to achieve economic growth, full employment, and price stability.
  • Monetary policy – refers to changes made in the supply of money to affect economic growth, employment, and prices. Generally is achieved with changes in interest rates and the sale and purchase of bonds.  
  • Regulatory policy – Free enterprise is the absence of government controls in the economy, but since unlimited freedom is impossible and one person’s freedom can conflict with another’s, government maintains law and order, protects people’s right to own property and enforces voluntary contracts.
  • Federal Reserve – the privately owned, publicly controlled central bank of the United States. The Federal Reserve regulates the supply of money in the economy through interest notes or by altering the reserve requirement, discount rate, and open market options. The Federal Reserve also supplies paper currency, called Federal Reserve Notes, holds banks’ reserves, provides check clearing services, and supervises member banks.

Other

  • Interest rates, money supply, banking regulation, trade relations, distribution of tax revenue, anti-monopoly laws, unemployment insurance, right to work laws, tariff laws, industrial safety, and quality regulation
NewG.4B Compare the role of government in the U.S. free enterprise system and other economic systems.

Compare

ROLE OF GOVERNMENT IN THE U.S. FREE ENTERPRISE SYSTEM AND OTHER ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

Including, but not limited to:

  • U.S. free enterprise – in a free enterprise system, individuals and businesses operate and compete with minimum government interference or regulation
  • Socialism – government controls some means of production (major industries)
  • Communism – government controls all means of production
NewG.4C Explain how government taxation, expenditures, and regulation can influence the U.S. economy and impact private enterprise.

Understand

HOW GOVERNMENT TAXATION AND REGULATION CAN SERVE AS RESTRICTIONS TO PRIVATE ENTERPRISE

Including, but not limited to:

  • All government regulations and taxation have a cost that businesses and everyday Americans absorb in order to improve the safety of products or working conditions, expand services to employers and citizens, or reduce harm to the environment
  • American society is characterized by a desire for a free market unencumbered by government interference as well as a fair and safe market for both producers and consumers
NewG.5 The student understands the relationship between U.S. government policies and the economy. The student is expected to:
NewG.5A Analyze how economic and natural resources influence U.S. foreign policy.

Analyze  

HOW ECONOMIC AND NATURAL RESOURCES INFLUENCE U.S. FOREIGN POLICY

Including, but not limited to:

  • U.S. foreign policy is influenced by a need to protect the economic and natural resources of the United States and the need to build relationships that facilitate economic growth in the United States. Increasing economic interdependence has impacted U.S. foreign policy as evidenced by trade agreements, efforts to open foreign markets to U.S. businesses, and U.S. involvement in the World Bank.
NewG.5B Describe the roles of the executive and legislative branches in setting international trade and fiscal policies.

Describe

ROLES OF THE EXECUTIVE AND LEGISLATIVE BRANCHES IN SETTING INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FISCAL POLICIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • International Trade Policies
    • The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) was created by Congress and operates as part of the Executive Branch.  The USTR has the responsibility of development and implementation of U.S. trade policy, including coordinating with Congress on pending legislation and testimony.
    • Trade agreements must be approved by Congress.
  • Fiscal Policies
    • The Executive Branch submits a budget from the President to Congress. Congress through a series of hearing created a budget resolution, which unlike an ordinary bill does not go to the President for a signature or veto. 
NewG.7 The student understands the structure and functions of the government created by the U.S. Constitution. The student is expected to:
NewG.7F Analyze selected issues raised by judicial activism and judicial restraint.

Analyze

ISSUES RAISED BY JUDICIAL ACTIVISM AND JUDICIAL RESTRAINT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Judicial activism–“legislating from the bench” occurs when judicial position is used to promote personal or political ends. Judicial activism violates the separation of powers by effectively creating new law that often affects the entire nation, instead of settling the particular case at hand.
    • Those who hold judicial activist views believe that it is the role of judges to make bold policy decisions and possibly even chart new constitutional ground. Judicial activists believe that the other two branches represent the majority of Americans and usually make fair decisions for most people. However, sometimes an individual's rights may suffer because he or she is always outvoted by the majority. In this case, the courts are the best branch for defending the individual's rights.
    • Engel v. Vitale (school prayer)
    • Miranda v. Arizona (Miranda warnings and the fifth amendment)
  • Judicial restraint– judges should defer to the actions of the legislative and executive branches, except in cases where those actions are clearly unconstitutional. The president and members of Congress are elected by the people, federal judges are not.
    • Those who hold judicial restraint views believe that the courts should leave policy decisions to the legislative and executive branches.
    • Advocates of this view argue that the federal courts, composed of unelected judges, are the least democratic branch of government, and that judges should not get involved in political questions or conflicts between the other two branches. 
    • Schenck v. United States (“clear and present danger” during wartime)
NewG.16 The student understands the relationship between government policies and the culture of the United States. The student is expected to:
NewG.16A Evaluate a U.S. government policy or court decision that has affected a particular racial, ethnic, or religious group such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the U.S. Supreme Court cases of Hernandez v. Texas and Grutter v. Bollinger.

Evaluate

GOVERNMENT POLICY OR COURT DECISION THAT HAS AFFECTED A PARTICULAR RACIAL, ETHNIC, OR RELIGIOUS GROUP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Civil Rights Act of 1964 – signed by President Lyndon Baines Johnson, made racial, religious, and sex discrimination by employers illegal. It also gave the federal government the power to enforce all laws governing civil rights including the desegregation of schools and public places.
  • Hernandez v. Texas – landmark Supreme Court case in which the court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment protects those beyond the racial classes of white or black, and extends to other racial groups, such as Mexican Americans in this case. The case involved a jury trial of a Mexican American with no Mexican Americans on the jury panel; in fact, no Mexican American had served on a jury in the county for 25 years.
  • Grutter v. Bollinger – landmark Supreme Court case involving the University of Michigan Law School’s affirmative action admissions policy that used race as a “predominant” factor, giving applicants belonging to certain minority groups a significantly greater chance of admission than students with similar credentials from disfavored racial groups. The Supreme Court upheld the policy, saying nothing in the Constitution prohibited the University from using a narrowly-tailored use of race in admissions to achieve the educational benefits of a diverse student body. The Court, however, did express that affirmative action should not be granted permanent status and envisioned a time in the future when it would not be needed to promote diversity.
  • Other possible policies and decisions:
    • Voting rights, Brown v. Board of Education
    • Issues surrounding American citizenship, discrimination in America other than racial/ethnic discrimination (women, gays, elderly, housing, education)
    • Other issues may be considered as they occur in current political discussions
NewG.16B Explain changes in American culture brought about by government policies such as voting rights, the Servicemen's Readjustment Act of 1944 (GI Bill of Rights), the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, affirmative action, and racial integration.

Explain

CHANGES IN AMERICAN CULTURE BROUGHT ABOUT BY GOVERNMENT POLICIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Voting rights – as the voting pool changes, so do the people elected by the votes. More racially diverse office-holders, more voice and participation in governmental processes for minorities.
  • Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (GI Bill) – part of the strategy to avoid economic downturn after World War II, the GI Bill allotted funds to send former soldiers to school. In the ten years after the war, more than eight million veterans went to school at government expense. Most sought vocational and technical training, but many also attended colleges and universities. In addition, the act allowed the Veteran’s Administration to guarantee $16 billion in loans to veterans so they could purchase homes, farms, or small businesses. The bill did contribute to economic stability after the war.
  • Immigration and Nationality Act of l965 – replaced an old system of immigration quotas meant to keep the balance of ethnic groups already in place with a system to quotas more favorable to immigrants from countries that had smaller populations in the country. The act set quotas on the number of immigrants from each hemisphere, but also on the total number of immigrants admitted each year. By equalizing immigration policies, the act resulted in new immigration from non-European nations which changed the ethnic make-up of the United States. The most dramatic effect was to shift immigration from European to Asian immigrants.
  • Immigrations Reform and Control Act of 1986 (also known as the Simpson-Mazzoli Act) – the act reformed immigration laws by requiring employers to attest to their employees’ immigration status, granted amnesty to certain illegal immigrants who had resided in the country continuously since 1982, and made it illegal to knowingly hire or recruit illegal immigrants.
  • Affirmative action – refers to policies that take factors including race, color, religion, sex, or national origin into consideration in order to benefit an underrepresented group, usually as a means to counter the effects of a history of discrimination. The focus of such policies ranges from employment and education to public contracting and health programs. Such policies have resulted in increased opportunities for women and minorities in education, employment, and business.
  • Racial integration – neighborhoods, schools, and governmental bodies changed, as did expectations of the population at large. The GI Bill played a large part in this since its statutory language was race-neutral.
NewG.17 The student understands the role the government plays in developing policies and establishing conditions that influence scientific discoveries and technological innovations. The student is expected to:
NewG.17A Explain how U.S. constitutional protections such as patents have fostered competition and entrepreneurship.

Explain

HOW U.S. GOVERNMENT CONSTITUTIONAL PROTECTIONS, SUCH AS PATENTS, HAVE FOSTERED COMPETITION AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Including, but not limited to:

  • Article 1, Section 8 provides for patent and copyrights, regulations of commerce
  • Article 1, Section 10 protects contracts
  • First Amendment protections for freedom of speech apply to commercial speech
  • Fifth Amendment protects the right to private property
NewG.17B Identify examples of government-assisted research that, when shared with the private sector, have resulted in improved consumer products such as computer and communication technologies.

Identify

EXAMPLES OF GOVERNMENT-ASSISTED RESEARCH THAT HAVE RESULTED IN IMPROVED CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • NASA inventions
  • National Institutes of Health
  • The Internet
  • Other topics may be added depending on creation of new consumer products
NewG.19 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewG.19A Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
NewG.19B Create a product on a contemporary government issue or topic using critical methods of inquiry.

Create

PRODUCT USING CRITICAL METHODS OF INQUIRY

  • Critical methods of inquiry involves evaluating sources of information in order to synthesize an understanding in the pursuit of the answer to a question.
NewG.19C Analyze and defend a point of view on a current political issue.

Analyze and Defend

A POINT OF VIEW

Including, but not limited to:

  • Point of view refers to the perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses in a document.
NewG.20 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
NewG.20A Use social studies terminology correctly.

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY
NewG.20B Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information using effective communication skills, including proper citations and avoiding plagiarism.

Create

WRITTEN, ORAL, VISUAL PRESENTATIONS USING EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Effective communication skills
    • Correct grammar and punctuation
    • Accurate spelling
    • Clear diction and sentence structure
    • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
TEKS# SE# Unit Level Developing TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
NewG.19 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewG.19D Analyze and evaluate the validity of information, arguments, and counterarguments from primary and secondary sources for bias, propaganda, point of view, and frame of reference.

Analyze, Evaluate

VALIDITY OF INFORMATION FROM PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Bias refers to a favoritism towards one way of thinking. All individuals exhibit bias, of which they may or may not be consciously aware.
  • Propaganda refers to information that is generally considered to be misleading or promotes a particular view point, partisan perspective
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses in a document.
  • Frame of reference refers to the life experiences of the author of a source
NewG.19E Evaluate government data using charts, tables, graphs, and maps.

Evaluate

GOVERNMENT DATA
NewG.21 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
NewG.21A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/19/2019
Loading
Data is Loading...