Hello, Guest!

Instructional Focus Document
United States History Studies Since 1877 Sequential
TITLE : Unit 09: Liberty and Justice for All – Civil Rights Movement 1900-1970s SUGGESTED DURATION : 15 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address the advancement of civil rights in the United States. This unit is primarily a study of reforming society. Following Reconstruction, laws passed by southern state legislatures that enforced racial segregation were upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). Throughout the early twentieth century racial inequalities in the United States were most evident in the “Jim Crow” laws that created a system of legal racial segregation which, coupled with de facto discrimination, resulted in institutionalized economic, political, and social disadvantages for African Americans and other minorities. Following the Second World War the United States became the defender of freedom and democracy, a position that was incompatible with the discrimination experienced by African Americans and other marginalized groups. Furthermore, many African Americans had fought in the Second World War to advance freedoms for others, yet were denied rights at home. It was in this climate that the modern Civil Rights Movement grew to strengthen and challenge the system of “separate but equal.”

Early successes in the Civil Rights Movement were realized through litigation, most notable the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling. Throughout the 1960s the movement was shaped by an influential religious leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. who advocated for peaceful civil disobedience. The movement spawned many groups who organized boycotts, sit-ins, teach-ins, and marches to fight for change. Despite opposition by many political leaders, especially a bloc of southern Democrats, the movement secured the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 along with the introduction of affirmative action. The struggle for civil rights expanded to include the demands of women, Mexican Americans, and American Indian groups for a more equal society. Despite the end of legal segregation and the expansion of rights, inequalities persisted fueling the calls of more militant groups for faster change. Tension surrounding the racial divide in the United States reached a pinnacle in 1968 with riots in many U.S. cities and the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. An examination of the civil rights movement is important for understanding how marginalized groups in the United States work to create a society that reflects the ideals of the founding documents of the United States and to understand how American society is affected by racial divisions.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about the Cold War, American economic prosperity of the 1950s and 1960s, and the cultural and political divisions created by the Vietnam War. 

During this Unit

In this unit, students trace the development of the civil rights movement from Reconstruction to modern times, including the desegregation of the military and Brown v. Board of Education (1954) which were not addressed in the previous unit. During this unit, students learn about the early efforts of civil rights leaders to use the courts to overturn legal segregation; the advances the movement made with the leadership of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.; the expansion of the movement to include a variety of political organizations that worked to advance the civil rights of African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, and women; the legislative gains made by the movement as part of Johnson’s Great Society; the arguments and actions of those in opposition to the movement; and about various landmark court cases and changes that were made to the U.S. Constitution to ensure the protection of civil rights. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by: 1) acquiring information from various sources, 2) identifying multiple viewpoints in sources, 3) evaluating sources for bias and validity, and 4) supporting conclusions with evidence. All social studies skills expectations are included in this unit to support the inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit students learn about the expanding world leadership of the United States during the 1970s – 1990s.


People act for change when they can no longer tolerate the conditions in which they live.

  • How do people act effectively to address intolerable conditions in society?

Change creates anxiety for those who want to preserve the status quo. 

  • How do people react to changes that are perceived to threaten their current way of life?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Early steps to granting civil rights to African Americans included amending the U.S. Constitution and using the court system to overturn legal segregation.

  • How did the passage of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments expand civil rights?
  • What was significant about the court’s decisions in the cases of Plessey v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, and Sweatt v. Painter?
  • Why was separate but equal as a doctrine overturned?
  • What role did Thurgood Marshall play in the Civil Rights Movement?

Cultural Patterns

  • Institutions

Civic Engagement

  • Democratic Principles

Cultural Patterns

  • Prejudice and Discrimination
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

The civil rights movement gained momentum under the leadership of Martin Luther King and expanded to include women, Mexican Americans, American Indians and militant groups in the struggle.

  • What impact did Rosa Parks, MLK, and groups like the Freedom Riders have in the struggle for civil rights?
  • What was significant about the Montgomery Bus Boycott?
  • What was significant about the writings/speeches of MLK?
  • Why did other oppressed groups join the struggle for civil rights and who were their leaders?
  • What approach was advocated by militant groups to gain civil rights and how did their approach compare to MLK’s approach?

Civic Engagement

  • Civic Virtue

Political Patterns

  • Human Rights

Cultural Patterns

  • Prejudice and Discrimination
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

While some fought to maintain the status quo, Great Society legislation was passed to address inequalities in America.

  • How did Jim Crow laws and the activities of the Ku Klux Klan work to suppress the rights of African-Americans?
  • Who resisted making the political and social changes demanded by the leaders of the Civil Rights Movement and why did they oppose these changes?
  • What social and economic changes were addressed by the Great Society programs, affirmative action, and Title IX legislation?

Historical Processes

  • Conflict/Cooperation

Political Patterns

  • Human Rights

Cultural Patterns

  • Prejudice and Discrimination

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Civil rights leaders continue to use the courts and constitutional amendment to ensure the protection of civil liberties.

  • How did the decisions made in Hernandez v. Texas, and   Wisconsin v. Yoder continue the advances of the Civil Rights Movement?
  • How did adoption of the 24th Amendment impact the extension of civil rights?
  • Why was it that the Supreme Court often served as the mediator of major social issues?

Political Patterns

  • Human Rights

Civic Engagement

  • Civic Institutions
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Whole Unit Performance Task:

Unit performance tasks are intended to serve as an additional assessment resource, especially for classrooms implementing performance/project based instructional models. Teachers may choose to use performance tasks as one large unit encompassing assessment in conjunction with incorporating the performance assessments as instructional processing activities or as an alternative to administering all of the unit performance assessments. Please consult the Unit Performance Tasks Best Practices resource for a more in-depth guide to implementation of performance tasks as an assessment tool.

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students may believe the Civil Rights Movement affected only African Americans.
  • Students may believe the Civil Rights Movement was limited to the 1950s and 1960s while not realizing the questions and struggles over civil rights started with independence and continues today.

Unit Vocabulary

civil rights – legally sanctioned individual freedoms guaranteed to citizens
social equality – condition in which all members of society have the same rights and opportunities
feminism – doctrine based on advocating for rights for women
desegregation – practice of eliminating legal separation of races, ethnicities, or religious groups
status quo – the current conditions
militant – one who aggressively supports a cause

Related Vocabulary

  •  segregation
  •  affirmative action
  •  civil disobedience
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

Show this message:

Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Readiness as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Supporting as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Process standards as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
NewUS.2 The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:
NewUS.2A Identify the major eras in U.S. history from 1877 to the present and describe their defining characteristics.
Readiness Standard

Identify, Describe

MAJOR ERAS IN U.S. HISTORY FROM 1877 TO PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Civil Rights Movement – this period in U.S. history was characterized by intense social change as many marginalized groups, including African Americans, women, Hispanics, and Native Americans, actively sought to institutional their civil rights; the efforts of many civil rights groups and civil rights leaders resulted in the passage of significant legislation, such as the Civil Rights Acts (1957 and 1964) and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, along with significant Supreme Court rulings, such as Brown v. Board of Education; differences over civil rights issues  coupled with anxiety about a war in Vietnam divided the nation resulting in protest and violence, most significantly the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy

STAAR Note:
The Spring 2018 STAAR assessed the 1960s as an era characterized by counter revolution, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and the Space Race.

NewUS.2B

Explain the significance of the following years as turning points: 1898 (Spanish-American War), 1914-1918 (World War I), 1929 (the Great Depression begins), 1939-1945 (World War II), 1957 (Sputnik launch ignites U.S.-Soviet space race), 1968 (Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination), 1969 (U.S. lands on the moon), 1991 (Cold War ends), 2001 (terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon), and 2008 (election of first black president, Barack Obama).


Supporting Standard

Explain

SIGNIFICANCE OF DATES AS TURNING POINTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • 1968 – Martin Luther King, Jr., assassination
NewUS.9 The student understands the impact of the American civil rights movement. The student is expected to:
NewUS.9A Trace the historical development of the civil rights movement from the late 1800s through the 21st century, including the 13th, 14th, 15th, and 19th amendments.
Readiness Standard

Trace

HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENTS FROM THE LATE 1800S THROUGH THE 21ST CENTURY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Civil rights – legal and political rights enjoyed by the inhabitants of a country. The Constitution and Bill of Rights guarantee civil rights to citizens and resident immigrants of the United States. Historically certain groups have denied civil rights, including African Americans, American Indians, and women.
  • Prior to the Civil War, the civil rights movement was centered on the issue of abolishing slavery. The ratification of the Reconstruction Amendments granted civil rights to the formerly enslaved African-Americans.
    • Thirteenth Amendment – adopted in 1865, eight months after the civil war ended, the amendment forbade slavery in the United States
    • Fourteenth   Amendment – declared that all persons born in the United States (except American Indian tribes) were citizens, that all citizens were entitled to equal rights regardless of their race, and their rights were protected by due process of the law (1868
  • Fifteenth Amendment –granted African American   men the right to vote (1870)
  • Major developments in the civil rights movement during the 20th century include
    • Civil rights activist W.E.B. Dubois advocated racial equality and was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) (1909), an organization whose mission is to advance justice for African American people
    • Ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment (1920) granting women the right to vote
    • Desegregation of the Armed Forces by President Truman (1948) by Executive Order, President Truman ended segregation in the armed forces, "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin.”
    • Mendez v. Westminster – federal court case that challenged racial segregation in Orange County, California schools. The District court held that segregating “Mexican” and “Mexican American” students into different “Mexican” schools was unconstitutional (1946).
    • Delgado v. Bastrop I.S.D. – U.S. Federal District Court case that decided the separation of Mexican American children based on national origin was illegal; forced the integration of children in Texas schools, but did allow separate classes for the first grade only, for language deficient or non-English speaking students (1948)
    • Hernandez v. Texas – U.S. Supreme Court case that decided Mexican Americans and other racial groups had equal protection under the 14th Amendment (1954).
    • Ending of the separate but equal doctrine with Brown v. Board of Education (1954) leading to the eventual desegregation of public facilities, most notably public schools
    • President Eisenhower ordered federal troops to protect African-American students enrolling in Little Rock High School, in Little Rock, Arkansas in order to enforce the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling that desegregated public schools
    • Supreme Court ruled that segregation on interstate transportation was illegal; the Freedom Rides of 1947 and later in the 1960’s were intended to bring attention to the on-going illegal segregation which had continued in the South
    • Civil Rights Act 1957 – first civil rights legislation since Reconstruction; it was primarily protection of voting rights; established a federal Civil Rights Commission with authority to investigate discriminatory conditions; empowered federal prosecutors to obtain court injunctions against interference with the right to vote. (signed into law by President Eisenhower)
    • Non-violent protests led by Martin Luther King, Jr., such as the Montgomery bus boycott (1955) started by the actions of Rosa Parks; other non-violent protests included the sit-ins and freedom rides that characterized the civil rights activities of the 1960s, and the March on Washington (1963)
    • Establishment of many groups during the 1960s dedicated to advancing civil rights,  including the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Congress on Racial Equality (CORE)
    • Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965
    • Passage of Title IX (1972)
    • Appointment of the first woman to the Supreme Court, Sandra Day O’Connor (1981)
    • Edgewood I.S.D. v. Kirby – a landmark case concerning public school finance and discrimination against students in poor school districts; this Texas case led to the decision to redistribute property taxes from wealthy school districts to poorer ones (1993).
  • Major developments in the civil rights movement during the 21st century include
    • Election of Barack Obama as the first African American President (2008)
    • Appointment of Sonia Sotomayor as the first Hispanic woman to Supreme Court (2009)
    • Elimination of restrictions on women serving in combat (2015)
    • Obergefell v. Hodges ruling extending marriage equality rights to all the U.S. states and the District of Columbia (2015)
    • Nomination of Hillary Clinton as the first female candidate for the presidency by a major political party (2016)
NewUS.9B Explain how Jim Crow laws and the Ku Klux Klan created obstacles to civil rights for minorities such as the suppression of voting.
Readiness Standard

Explain

HOW JIM CROW LAWS AND THE KU KLUX KLAN CREATED OBSTACLES TO CIVIL RIGHTS FOR MINORITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Jim Crow laws – with the end of Reconstruction, legislatures in the southern states passes laws intended to enforce racial segregation. Jim Crow laws also encompassed laws which required the ownership of property, paying a poll tax, or being able to read as conditions to vote. The intent and consequence was a limiting of the voting rights of African Americans. These laws were enforced by government officials as well as by the violence and intimidation of vigilante groups such as the Ku Klux Klan.
  • Ku Klux Klan – supposedly secret organization originally formed in the late 1860s by ex-Confederate soldiers in opposition to Reconstruction, but later disbanded. White nativists revived the organization in 1915, inspired by a nostalgic vision of the former South and the movie Birth of a Nation. The 1920s witnessed the next resurgence of the Klan whose leaders capitalized on the social tension of the time, appealing to those uncomfortable with the shift towards an industrial, urban society. The organization advocates devout patriotism and white supremacy. In addition to targeting African Americans they also view Catholics, Jews, and foreigners as threats to the American way of life. During the 1920s the Klan was successful at infiltrating local and state politics with its support for candidates. Members of the group have also been implicated in vigilante acts of violence generally directed at African Americans, especially lynching’s in the 1920s.
NewUS.9C Describe the roles of political organizations that promote African American, Chicano, American Indian, and women's civil rights.
Supporting Standard

Describe

ROLES OF POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS THAT PROMOTED CIVIL RIGHTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Political organizations organized rallies, demonstrations, boycotts, and lobbying efforts.
  • Examples of  political reform organizations include:
    • African American – NAACP, Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Congress on Racial Equality (CORE)
    • Chicano – League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), United Farm Workers Organizing Committee (UFWOC), La Raza Unida (Mexican-Americans United)
    • American Indian – American Indian Movement (AIM)
    • Women's civil rights movements – National Organization for Women (NOW)
    • Jews – Anti-Defamation League (ADL)
    • Other civil rights organizations – Human Rights Campaign (HRC), American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC)
NewUS.9D Identify the roles of significant leaders who supported various rights movements, including Martin Luther King, Jr., Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta, Rosa Parks, and Betty Friedan.
Supporting Standard

Identify

SIGNIFICANT LEADERS WHO SUPPORTED VARIOUS RIGHTS MOVEMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Martin Luther King, Jr. – leader of the Civil Rights Movement; advocated nonviolent civil disobedience and demanded equal rights for African Americans including desegregation in the public sphere
  • Caesar Chavez – Hispanic labor leader and farm worker who worked for reforms and rights of migrant workers; with Dolores Huerta formed the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) in 1962; in 1966 the NFWA combined with the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) and in 1972 joined the AFL-CIO becoming the United Farm Workers Union
  • Dolores Huerta – advocate and lobbyist for farmworkers' rights who with Caesar Chavez organized the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) in 1962, which later became the United Farm Workers of America
  • Rosa Parks – African American civil rights activist; in Montgomery, Alabama (1955); was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the city bus for a white man, which led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Betty Friedan – wrote The Feminine Mystic, detailing the concerns of American housewives which reinvigorated the women’s movement, co–founded NOW (National Organization of Women)
NewUS.9E Compare and contrast the approach taken by the Black Panthers with the nonviolent approach of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Supporting Standard

Compare, Contrast

 

APPROACH TAKEN BY BLACK PANTHERS WITH NON-VIOLENT APPROACH OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Including, but not limited to:

  • Black Panthers – militant group which argued that armed resistance may be needed to gain civil rights and that traditional approaches to gaining civil rights had not produced results
  • Martin Luther King Jr. – noted for his advocacy of civil disobedience and to refrain from responding to acts of aggression with violence; manifested in sit-ins and marches; influenced nonviolent approach of advocated by Southern Christian Leaders Conference (SCLC), National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

 

NewUS.9F Discuss the impact of the writings of Martin Luther King Jr. such as his "I Have a Dream" speech and "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on the civil rights movement.
Supporting Standard

Discuss

IMPACT OF THE WRITINGS OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.

Including, but not limited to:

  • “I have a Dream” speech – delivered at the March on Washington; became the mantra for many involved in the movement; quoted the Declaration of Independence “all men are created equal…”
  • “Letter from Birmingham Jail” – "There are two types of laws, just and unjust," wrote Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from jail in 1963. "One has a moral responsibility to disobey unjust laws"; Similar to the Declaration of Independence, which states that a society has the right to abolish the government if it is not meeting the needs of the people.
NewUS.9G Describe presidential actions and congressional votes to address minority rights in the United States, including desegregation of the armed forces, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
Readiness Standard

Describe

PRESIDENTIAL ACTIONS AND CONGRESSIONAL VOTES TO ADDRESS MINORITY RIGHTS IN THE UNITED STATES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Desegregation of the armed forces – in 1948, by Executive Order, President Truman ended segregation in the armed forces, "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the President that there shall be equality of treatment and opportunity for all persons in the armed services without regard to race, color, religion, or national origin.”
  • President Eisenhower ordered federal troops to protect African-American students enrolling in Little Rock High School, in Little Rock, Arkansas in order to enforce the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education ruling that desegregated public schools
  • Civil Rights Act 1964 – abolished racial, religious, and sex discrimination by employers; unlawful for an employer to “fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual, or otherwise to discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges or employment, because of such individual’s race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.” (signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson)
  • Voting Rights Act 1965 – passed to protect voting rights of African Americans; intended to prevent obstructions to voting for African American voters, such as paying a poll tax or taking a literacy test in order to be eligible to vote; ensured rights granted in the Fifteenth Amendment
NewUS.9H Explain how George Wallace, Orval Faubus, and the Congressional bloc of southern Democrats sought to maintain the status quo.
Supporting Standard

Explain

HOW GEORGE WALLACE, ORVAL FAUBUS AND SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS SOUGHT TO MAINTAIN THE STATUS QUO

Including, but not limited to:

  • George Wallace – Governor of Alabama; ran for U.S. President four times; fierce pro-segregationist; quote from his inaugural address, “I say segregation today, segregation tomorrow, and segregation forever”
  • Orval Faubus – Governor of Arkansas; best known for his stand in the desegregation of Little Rock High School where he ordered Arkansas National Guard to stop African American students from entering the school.  In response President Eisenhower sent the U.S. Army to escort the students to school.
  • The Congressional bloc of southern Democrats – group of 18 southern Democrats and one Republican, worked to block the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by relying on a filibuster in the Senate to postpone the legislation as long as possible, hoping that support for the legislation throughout the country would falter
NewUS.9I Evaluate changes in the United States that have resulted from the civil rights movement, including increased participation of minorities in the political process.
Readiness Standard

Evaluate

CHANGES IN THE UNITED STATES THAT HAVE RESULTED FROM THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Increase in voter registration and participation
  • Increase in the number of minorities running for office as well as elected and appointed to political positions
  • Changes to the national identity that has become more inclusive in nature
  • Laws to end racial segregation
NewUS.9J Describe how Sweatt v. Painter and Brown v. Board of Education played a role in protecting the rights of the minority during the civil rights movement.
Supporting Standard

Describe

HOW SWEATT V. PAINTER AND BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION PLAYED A ROLE IN PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF THE MINORITY DURING THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sweatt v. Painter – a young African American man (Sweatt) was refused admission to the University of Texas Law School. The State of Texas delayed six months in order to create a “separate” law school in Houston for African Americans. Later the U.S. Supreme Court overturned the Texas Supreme Court ruling allowing this action. The U.S. Supreme Court said the separation was illegal because the school was not equal due to the Equal Protection Clause; to reach equality you must consider the quantitative differences and the intangible factors (1950).
  •   Brown v. Board of Education – argued by   Thurgood Marshall in 1954, challenged the “separate-but-equal” philosophy which   fostered inadequate educational systems for African Americans. The U.S.   Supreme Court ruled that segregation in public schools was prohibited by the   U.S. Constitution.
NewUS.17 The student understands the economic effects of government policies from World War II through the present. The student is expected to:
NewUS.17D Identify the actions and outcomes of government policies intended to create economic opportunities for citizens such as the Great Society, affirmative action, and Title IX.
Supporting Standard

Identify

ACTIONS OF GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SECTOR TO EXPAND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Great Society – set of domestic programs designed to eliminate poverty and racial injustice, such as the Food Stamp Act (1964), Housing and Urban Development Act (1965), Child Nutrition Act (1966), Head start (1965), Medicaid (1965), Medicare (1966), and Job Corps (1964)
  • Affirmative Action – refers to the steps taken to increase the representation of women and minorities in areas of employment, education, and business from which they have been historically excluded; developed from ideas introduced in Executive Order 10925 issued by President John F. Kennedy in 1961
  • Title IX – "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance..." Title IX is best known for its impact on high school and collegiate athletics.
NewUS.20 The student understands the impact of constitutional issues on American society. The student is expected to:
NewUS.20A

Analyze the effects of landmark U.S. Supreme Court decisions, including Plessy v. Ferguson, Brown v. Board of Education, Hernandez v. Texas, Tinker v. Des Moines, and Wisconsin v. Yoder.


Readiness Standard

Analyze

EFFECTS OF LANDMARK U.S. SUPREME COURT DECISIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • U.S. Supreme Court decisions have far-reaching actions that impacted life in the U.S.
  • Landmark cases
    • Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) – the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states can constitutionally enact legislation requiring persons of different races to use “separate but equal” segregated facilities.
      • Effects: Facilities such as bathrooms, theaters, railroad cars, etc., remained segregated and often unequal
    • Brown v. Board of Education (1954) – the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that “racially segregated schools are inherently unequal.”
      • Effects: Pressured states to bring an end to state supported segregation of public facilities; most notably schools were the first to desegregate as a result of the ruling; severed as the judicial basis to argue for achieving equality in other public areas
    • Hernandez v. Texas (1954) – the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Mexican Americans and all other racial groups in the U.S. have equal protection under the 14th Amendment. The systematic exclusion of persons of Mexican ancestry from juries violated the Constitution.
      • Effects: Mexican Americans could not be excluded from participating in juries
    • Wisconsin v. Yoder (1972) – the U.S. Supreme Court decided Amish children could not be placed in compulsory schools past 8th grade because it violated the parents’ rights to freedom of religion (Free Exercise Clause)
      • Effects: Prohibited states from claiming absolute right to compel school attendance beyond the eighth grade or to intrude in how families raise their children

STAAR Note:

On the 2013 STAAR and 2015 STAAR, the case of Miranda v. Arizona (1966) was assessed – The U.S. Supreme court ruled that suspects must be informed of their constitutional rights (right to legal counsel, etc.) prior to being interrogated by police.

The 2017 STAAR assessed the effect of the ruling in the Escobedo v. Illinois (1964)decision.

NewUS.20B Explain why landmark constitutional amendments have been proposed and ratified from 1877 to the present.
Supporting Standard

Explain

WHY LANDMARK CONSTITUTION AMENDMENTS HAVE BEEN PROPOSED

Including, but not limited to:

  • Historically the U.S. Constitution has been amended to address governmental procedural issues or policies. Examples include the adoption of the Sixteenth Amendment (income tax), Seventeenth Amendment (direct election of Senators), Twentieth Amendment (inauguration date), Twenty-second Amendment (presidential term limits), Twenty-fifth Amendment (presidential succession) and the Twenty-seventh Amendment (legislators’ compensation).
  • Additionally the U.S. Constitution has been amended in response to changing social conditions, such as the Eighteenth Amendment’s prohibition on the sale of alcohol, the adoption of the Seventeenth Amendment in response to perceived government corruption and the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in response to the changing views of women in society.
  • Generally the adoption of amendments to the U.S. Constitution results in an expansion of rights such as with the Nineteenth Amendment (women’s suffrage), Twenty-third Amendment (Washington, D.C. electors), and Twenty-sixth Amendment (voting age at 18). Some amendments redress the suppression of rights, such as the Twenty-fourth Amendment ending poll taxes.  Even the Twenty-first Amendment which repealed prohibition reaffirmed the extension of rights which had been previously restricted.
NewUS.22 The student understands the promises of the Declaration of Independence and the protections of the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights. The student is expected to:
NewUS.22A Identify and analyze methods of expanding the right to participate in the democratic process, including lobbying, non-violent protesting, litigation, and amendments to the U.S. Constitution.
Readiness Standard

Identify, Analyze

METHODS OF EXPANDING THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN THE DEMOCRATIC PROCESS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Lobbying – the act of persuading legislators to vote for legislation; advocacy groups and political action committees frequently pool money to fund activities related to lobbying government officials and influencing public opinion
  • Non-violent protesting – advocated by Martin Luther King and evidenced in such events as the March on Washington (1963)
  • Court decisions – court decisions can declare discriminatory laws as unconstitutional, hence promoting equal access to civil liberties, such as in the case of White v. Regester
  • Litigation – involves the process of taking a case to court; many cases involving participation in the democratic process are eventually adjudicated in the U.S. Supreme Court
  • Amendments to the U.S. Constitution – theFifteenth Amendment, Nineteenth Amendment, Twenty-fourth Amendment, and Twenty-sixth Amendment have expanded the rights of Americans to participate specifically in voting

STAAR Note:

The Spring 2018 STAAR assessed student knowledge that issues related to the election of senators was addressed by a constitutional amendment.
NewUS.22B Evaluate various means of achieving equality of political rights, including the 19th, 24th, and 26th amendments and congressional acts such as the American Indian Citizenship Act of 1924.
Supporting Standard

Evaluate

VARIOUS MEANS OF ACHIEVING EQUALITY OF POLITICAL RIGHTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Assembly – forming organizations, holding rallies
  • Nineteenth Amendment – women’s right to vote
  • Twenty-fourth Amendment – eliminates poll tax
  • Twenty-sixth Amendment – right to vote at age 18
  • American Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 – granted citizenship to all American Indians born in the United States
  • Proposed Equal Rights Amendment (ERA)
NewUS.23 The student understands the importance of effective leadership in a constitutional republic. The student is expected to:
NewUS.23A

Evaluate the contributions of significant political and social leaders in the United States such as Andrew Carnegie, Thurgood Marshall, Billy Graham, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Hillary Clinton.


Supporting Standard

Evaluate

CONTRIBUTIONS OF SIGNIFICANT POLITICAL AND SOCIAL LEADERS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Thurgood Marshall – distinguished lawyer who successfully argued for desegregation in Brown v. Board of Education;  appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court (1967)

STAAR Note:
The Spring 2013 STAAR assessed that Franklin D. Roosevelt-delivered evening radio speeches (Fireside Chats) to reassure the public during the Great Depression as a significant contribution by a political figure.

NewUS.25 The student understands how people from various groups contribute to our national identity. The student is expected to:
NewUS.25A Explain actions taken by people to expand economic opportunities and political rights for racial, ethnic, gender, and religious groups in American society.
Readiness Standard

Explain

ACTIONS TAKEN BY PEOPLE TO EXPAND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES AND POLITICAL RIGHTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Supporting political candidates
  • Organizing and leading protests and boycotts
  • Using media to change public opinion
  • Lobbying for legislation
  • Taking action in the courts

STAAR Note:
The 2014 STAAR assessed the actions and attitude of Booker T. Washington indicating that the focus of the student expectation may include actions of individuals, not just groups.
The 2015 STAAR assessed the action of Cesar Chavez as an instrumental leader in organizing a boycott to gain rights for migrant farm workers.
The 2016 STAAR assessed the purpose of the United Farm Workers movement.
The 2017 STAAR assessed a comparison of the Trail of Broken Treaties protest in 1972 with the 1964 March on Washington protest.
The 2018 STAAR assessed student knowledge of constitutional amendments that were argued in a case involving religious discrimination.

NewUS.25C Explain how the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, gender, and religious groups shape American culture.
Readiness Standard

Explain

HOW THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PEOPLE OF VARIOUS RACIAL, ETHNIC, GENDER, AND RELIGIOUS GROUPS HAVE HELPED SHAPE AMERICAN CULTURE

Including, but not limited to:

  • America’s history is characterized by waves of immigration creating a cultural mosaic that reflects the contributions of people from a variety of groups. The contributions of individuals and groups are too numerous to separately list, but collectively make American culture unique.
  • Migration within the United States has resulted in cultural diffusion.

STAAR Note:
The 2013 STAAR assessed the historical significance of Jackie Robinson as the first African American to play on a major league baseball team, leading to the integration of baseball.
The 2014 STAAR assessed the historical significance of women’s contributions in the efforts to pass the Eighteenth Amendment.
The 2016 STAAR assessed the cultural spread of gospel music as resulting from the Great Migration.
The 2017 STAAR assessed the cultural contributions made by Mexican-American artists who painted murals in California.
The 2018 STAAR assessed the contribution of Lacrosse as made by American Indians.

NewUS.25D

Identify the contributions of women such as Rosa Parks, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Sonia Sotomayor to American society.


Supporting Standard

Identify

CONTRIBUTIONS OF WOMEN TO AMERICAN SOCIETY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Rosa Parks – African American civil rights activist; in Montgomery, Alabama (1955); was arrested for refusing to give up her seat on the city bus for a white man, which led to the Montgomery Bus Boycott
  • Eleanor Roosevelt – First Lady, appointed by President Truman as a delegate to the United Nations General Assembly and became the first chairperson of the preliminary United Nations Commission on Human Rights

STAAR Note:
The 2015 STAAR assessed the significance of Shirley Chisholm’s election to Congress.

NewUS.28 The student understands how historians use historiography to interpret the past and applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewUS.28A Analyze primary and secondary sources such as maps, graphs, speeches, political cartoons, and artifacts to acquire information to answer historical questions.
Process Standard

Analyze

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION AND ANSWER HISTORICAL QUESITONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Maps
  • Graphs
  • Speeches
  • Political cartoons/broadsides
  • Artifacts
  • Diaries
  • Newspapers/articles
  • Historical documents
STAAR Note:
These skills will be incorporated into STAAR test questions from reporting categories 1-4 and will be identified along with content standards
NewUS.28B Analyze information by applying absolute and relative chronology through sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions.
Process Standard

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
STAAR Note:
These skills will be incorporated into STAAR test questions from reporting categories 1-4 and will be identified along with content standards.
NewUS.28C Apply the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence.

Apply

PROCESS OF HISTORICAL INQUIRY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Creating a compelling question
  • Analyzing sources by close reading, contextualizing, sourcing, and corroborating
  • Synthesizing information from sources
  • Developing conclusions based on evidence from sources
  • Reporting conclusions
NewUS.28D Evaluate the validity of a source based on corroboration with other sources and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context.
Process Standard

Evaluate

VALIDITY OF A SOURCE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Corroboration with other sources provides information about what aspects of the source are similar to or different from other sources.
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an author expresses in a document.
  • Information about the author is needed to evaluate the credibility and expertise of the author.
  • Examining historical context or the time in which the author lived, along with frame of reference or the life experiences of the author are important for understanding the influences on the author’s point of view.
NewUS.28E Identify bias and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event.

Identify, Support

POINT OF VIEW

Including, but not limited to:

  • Bias refers to a favoritism towards one way of thinking. All individuals exhibit bias, of which they may or may not be consciously aware.
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses in a document.
  • Historical interpretations, considered as a point of view on a social studies issues or event should be supported by evidence.
NewUS.29 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
NewUS.29A Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information using effective communication skills, including proper citations and avoiding plagiarism.

Create

WRITTEN, ORAL, AND VISUAL PRESENTATIONS

Use

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Correct grammar and punctuation
  • Accurate spelling
  • Clear diction and sentence structure
  • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
NewUS.29B Use social studies terminology correctly.
Process Standard

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY

DEVELOPING TEKS

TEKS that need continued practice, improvement, and refinement, but do not necessarily need to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Readiness as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Supporting as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Process standards as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
NewUS.30 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
NewUS.30A Create a visual representation of historical information such as thematic maps, graphs, and charts.

Create

THEMATIC MAPS, GRAPHS, AND CHARTS

NewUS.30B Pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases.
Process Standard

Pose, Answer

QUESTIONS ABOUT GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND PATTERNS SHOWN ON MAPS, GRAPHS, CHARTS, MODELS, AND DATABASES

NewUS.31 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
NewUS.31A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/19/2019
Loading
Data is Loading...