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Instructional Focus Document
United States History Studies Since 1877 Sequential
TITLE : Unit 06: Economic Bust – the Great Depression 1929-1939 SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

This unit bundles student expectations that address the Great Depression and the New Deal response. This unit is primarily a study of economic policy. In 1929 the crash of the stock market brought an end to the economic prosperity of the 1920s and ushered in the worst economic depression in U.S. history. It was also during the 1930’s that drought and poor agricultural practices coupled to turn the heartland of the Great Plains into a “Dust Bowl” further straining economic growth in the United States. Americans looked to the federal government to revive the economy and relieve poverty brought about by the depression. President Roosevelt became the architect of New Deal legislation intended to alleviate the economic crisis. The New Deal significantly changed the relationship between the government and the economy in the United States. The eventual end of the economic depression of the 1930s was relieved with the economic growth created by the Second World War. An examination of the Great Depression is important for understanding the expansion in size and power of the federal government in the United States and evaluating the role of government in times of economic crisis.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about the economic boom and changing social patterns that characterized 1920s America.

During this Unit

During this unit students study about the causes of the Great Depression along with the economic and social impact of the depression; the economic impact of the “Dust Bowl” on the agricultural sector; and about the provisions of the New Deal along with its impact on the role of government. Additionally, students continue to develop historical inquiry skills by: 1) acquiring information from various sources, 2) identifying multiple viewpoints in sources, 3) evaluating sources for bias and validity, and 4) supporting conclusions with evidence. All social studies skills expectations are included in this unit to support the inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit students study about the United States’ involvement in the Second World War.


Societies utilize institutions to promote order, security, and stability.

  • How do societies act to ensure the well-being of their people?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Stock market speculation, bank failures, and high tariffs contributed to economic depression of the 1930s.

  • What led to the crash of the stock market in 1929?
  • What was characteristic of economic and social conditions during the Great Depression?
  • How was the Great Depression reflected in art and literature?

Economic Patterns

  • Scarcity/Choices

Cultural Patterns

  • Artistic Expression
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Overproduction and drought resulted in the Dust Bowl which devastated the agricultural sector of the U.S. economy.

  • Where was the Dust Bowl?
  • How did the Dust Bowl change settlement patterns in the United States?

Spatial Patterns

  • Human-Environment Interaction
  • Migration
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

In order to address the economic depression, relief, recovery, and reform legislation known as the New Deal was enacted, resulting in a more active role of the government in economic policy and American society.

  • What programs were created by the New Deal legislation?
  • What constitutional issues came to light with President Franklin Roosevelt’s attempt to increase the number of Supreme Court justices?
  • How did the economic depression influence government policies regarding ethnic groups and immigration?
  • What arguments were made by critics of the New Deal?
  • What New Deal programs continue to affect the lives of U.S. citizens?

Political Patterns

  • Ideologies

Historical Processes

  • Growth/Decay

Cultural Patterns

  • Ethnicity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Whole Unit Performance Task:

Unit performance tasks are intended to serve as an additional assessment resource, especially for classrooms implementing performance/project based instructional models. Teachers may choose to use performance tasks as one large unit encompassing assessment in conjunction with incorporating the performance assessments as instructional processing activities or as an alternative to administering all of the unit performance assessments. Please consult the Unit Performance Tasks Best Practices resource for a more in-depth guide to implementation of performance tasks as an assessment tool.

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students may have the perception that government had always provided social programs.

Unit Vocabulary

economic depression – a sustained economic decline characterized by high unemployment, low levels of production, and business failures
social welfare – government provided services
drought – sustained period with no precipitation and restricted water access

Related Vocabulary

  • tariffs
  • unemployment
  • court packing
  • New Deal
  • Dust Bowl
  • speculation
  • repatriation
  • deportation
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Creator if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TEKS# SE# Unit Level Taught Directly TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Readiness as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Supporting as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Process standards as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
NewUS.2 The student understands traditional historical points of reference in U.S. history from 1877 to the present. The student is expected to:
NewUS.2A Identify the major eras in U.S. history from 1877 to the present and describe their defining characteristics.
Readiness Standard

Identify, Describe

MAJOR ERAS IN U.S. HISTORY FROM 1877 TO PRESENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Great Depression – this era in U.S. history was characterized by a deep economic depression, marked by high unemployment ; the agriculture sector was devastated by a drought that ushered in the Dust Bowl; in response to the economic crisis the role of federal government expanded with the creation of Social Security, FDIC, and the initiation of other New Deal programs

STAAR Note:

The Spring 2018 STAAR assessed the 1960s as an era characterized by counter revolution, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and the Space Race.
NewUS.2B

Explain the significance of the following years as turning points: 1898 (Spanish-American War), 1914-1918 (World War I), 1929 (the Great Depression begins), 1939-1945 (World War II), 1957 (Sputnik launch ignites U.S.-Soviet space race), 1968 (Martin Luther King, Jr. assassination), 1969 (U.S. lands on the moon), 1991 (Cold War ends), 2001 (terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the Pentagon), and 2008 (election of first black president, Barack Obama).


Supporting Standard

Explain

SIGNIFICANCE OF DATES AS TURNING POINTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • 1929 – Stock Market Crash, beginning of the Great Depression
    • United States becomes economically vulnerable
    • Changing role of federal government in domestic economic policy
NewUS.12 The student understands the impact of geographic factors on major events. The student is expected to:
NewUS.12A

Analyze the impact of physical and human geographic factors on the Klondike Gold Rush, the Panama Canal, the Dust Bowl, and the levee failure in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.


Readiness Standard

Analyze

IMPACT OF PHYSICAL AND HUMAN GEOGRAPHIC FACTORS

Including, but not limited to:

  • The Dust Bowl
    • Human factors – many farmers had misused the land by generally over planting and not rotating crops depleting the top soil; millions of acres of farmland became useless;  hundreds of thousands of people migrated from the region, many to California 
    • Physical factors – years of sustained drought caused the land to dry up;  great clouds of dust and sand were carried by the wind , hence the name “Dust Bowl”
NewUS.13 The student understands the causes and effects of migration and immigration on American society. The student is expected to:
NewUS.13A

Analyze the causes and effects of changing demographic patterns resulting from migration within the United States, including western expansion, rural to urban, the Great Migration, and the Rust Belt to the Sun Belt.


Readiness Standard

Analyze

CAUSES AND EFFECTS OF CHANGING DEMOGRAPHIC PATTERNS RESULTING FROM MIGRATION WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Great Depression
    • Cause: abandonment of farms located in the Dust Bowl for jobs mainly in California
    • Effect: increasing population along the West Coast
NewUS.14 The student understands the relationship between population growth and the physical environment. The student is expected to:
NewUS.14A Identify the effects of population growth and distribution on the physical environment.
Readiness Standard

Identify

EFFECTS OF POPULATION GROWTH AND DISTRIBUTION ON THE PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Urbanization as workers migrated to cities in search of jobs
  • Cities became polluted; waterways contaminated; air quality diminished; ecosystems disrupted
  • Urban sprawl; growth of suburbs
  • Settlement in animal habitats; deforestation
  • Increased demand for resources especially water and energy,  resulting in the building of dams
  • Building of railroads, roads, and infrastructure to meet transportation and communication needs
  • Increased demand for food resulting in the conversion of natural habitats to farmland
  • Establishment of the National Park System to protect land from population growth
  • Creation of private nonprofit organizations dedicated to protecting the physical environment

STAAR Note:

The 2017 STAAR assessed student’s knowledge with a display of two photographs related to urbanization in Miami from 1913 and 1997.
NewUS.16 The student understands significant economic developments between World War I and World War II. The student is expected to:
NewUS.16B Identify the causes of the Great Depression, including the impact of tariffs on world trade, stock market speculation, bank failures, and the monetary policy of the Federal Reserve System.
Readiness Standard

Identify

CAUSES OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Impact of tariffs on world trade – high tariffs limited foreign trade and investment and were a barrier to European countries repaying the debts they owed the United States following the First World War
  • Stock market speculation – buying stocks on margin (needing only 10% of the price of a stock to be able to complete the purchase) led to rampant speculation (occurs when investors buy shares of stock in a company for the sole purpose of selling them once they increase in value), which led to falsely high stock prices
  • Bank failures – after the stock market crashed, millions of Americans grew fearful that banks would fail and began to withdraw their money. Virtually overnight thousands of banks were in peril. The more money Americans withdrew, the more banks failed, and the more banks failed, the more money Americans withdrew. Banks were not secure and the money in them was not insured if banks failed, resulting in the loss of savings for many Americans.
  • The monetary policy of the Federal Reserve System –the "Fed" indirectly sets interest rates because it loans money, at a base rate, to commercial banks. In 1928 and 1929, the Fed raised interest rates to try to curb Wall Street speculation.
NewUS.16C Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on the U.S. economy and society such as widespread unemployment and deportation and repatriation of people of Mexican heritage.
Readiness Standard

Analyze

EFFECTS OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION ON THE U.S. ECONOMY AND SOCIETY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Widespread unemployment – by 1933 unemployment was at 25% according to Bureau of Labor Statistics prompting food shortages and “bread lines”; as demand for consumer goods declined manufacturers reduced production which resulted in less demand for labor bringing about layoffs; the inability of consumers to continue making installment payments also resulted in reduced production and subsequent layoffs
  • Deportation and repatriation of people of Mexican heritage – in the mist of the Great Depression hostility towards Mexican and Mexican-American workers intensified. President Hoover instituted a program of “real jobs for real Americans,” which resulted in the passage of local laws prohibiting the employment of anyone of Mexican descent, even U.S. citizens. Major employers laid off Mexican and Mexican-American workers and public officials ultimately deported over 1 million Mexican Americans. Mexicans were blamed for the economic crisis and the deportations were justified by misinformation that Mexicans strained the welfare and charity systems.
  • Economic conditions prompted government intervention in the economy to create jobs by instituting new programs such as the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Civilian Conservation Corps(CCC),Civil Works Administration (CVA), Public Works Administration (PWA), and Works Progress Administration (WPA)
NewUS.16D Compare the New Deal policies and its opponents' approaches to resolving the economic effects of the Great Depression.
Supporting Standard

Compare

NEW DEAL POLICIES AND ITS OPPONENTS' APPROACHES TO RESOLVING THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF THE GREAT DEPRESSION

Including, but not limited to:

  • New Deal policies were intended to provide relief, reform and recovery by creating worker programs, reforming banking and business practices, instituting new government programs, and promoting economic recovery.
  • Opponents to the New Deal policies argued that it overregulated businesses and restricted individual freedom. Opponents include some who argued for the government redistribution of wealth known as the Share Our Wealth Plan advocated mostly by Louisiana Senator Huey Long. Francis Townsend, a California doctor, argued for a pension plan that would require those receiving payments to spend the money. The plan was never instituted but set the stage for Social Security.
  • In 1932 President Hoover approved the creation of the Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC) as a government agency tasked with authorizing loans to large businesses that had suffered losses as a result of the Great Depression. The agency continued to operate through the Great Depression and the Second World War.
  • Policies of supporters and opponents of the New Deal advocated government intervention to protect the economy and private businesses.
NewUS.16E Describe how various New Deal agencies and programs, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Social Security Administration, continue to affect the lives of U.S. citizens.
Supporting Standard

Describe

VARIOUS NEW DEAL AGENCIES AND PROGRAMS

Including, but not limited to:

  • FDIC – Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation – this government insurance of deposit accounts at member banks up to $250,000.00 per account continues to provide stability to the banking industry
  • SEC – Security and Exchange Commission – continues to regulate the stock markets and businesses ensuring against fraud
  • SSA – Social Security Administration – continues to provide income to elderly Americans as a retirement investment
NewUS.18 The student understands changes over time in the role of government. The student is expected to:
NewUS.18A Evaluate the impact of New Deal legislation on the historical roles of state and federal government.
Readiness Standard

Evaluate

IMPACT OF NEW DEAL LEGISLATION ON HISTORICAL ROLES OF STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Passage of New Deal legislation marked a significant change in the role of the federal government in the lives of the U.S. populace.  In response to the conditions of the Great Depression, the Roosevelt Administration took on the responsibility of addressing the poor economic conditions, most notably high unemployment. New Deal policies administered grants to state government to implement programs, thus establishing a significant role for government involvement in stabilizing the economy at both the state and federal level.

STAAR Note:

The Spring 2016 STAAR assessed the impact of the Social Security Act (1935) on the role of the federal government.
NewUS.18B

Explain constitutional issues raised by federal government policy changes during times of significant events, including World War I, the Great Depression, World War II, the 1960s, and September 11, 2001.


Readiness Standard

Explain

CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES RAISED BY FEDERAL GOVERNMENT POLICY CHANGES DURING TIMES OF SIGNIFICANT EVENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Great Depression – Roosevelt’s attempt to increase the number of Supreme Court justices from 9 to 13 would have created a shift in the “separation of powers” and “checks and balances”;  New Deal Legislation was challenged in the courts because of concern that the growing power of the federal government infringed on the power of the states
NewUS.19 The student understands the changing relationships among the three branches of the federal government. The student is expected to:
NewUS.19B

Evaluate the impact of relationships among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of government, including Franklin D. Roosevelt's attempt to increase the number of U.S. Supreme Court justices and the presidential election of 2000.


Readiness Standard

Evaluate

IMPACT OF RELATIONSHIPS AMONG BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Franklin Roosevelt's attempt to increase the number of U.S. Supreme Court justices, could be viewed as an increase in executive power at the expense of the judicial branch
    • Impact – divided the Democratic party and hindered Roosevelt’s work in passing domestic legislation

STAAR Note:

The 2017 STAAR assessed how the Supreme Court ruling about the line item veto illustrated the changing relationship among the branches.
NewUS.24 The student understands the relationship between the arts and the times during which they were created. The student is expected to:
NewUS.24A Describe how the characteristics and issues in U.S. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature.
Supporting Standard

Describe

CHARACTERISTICS AND ISSUES IN U.S. HISTORY HAVE BEEN REFLECTED IN VARIOUS GENRES OF ART, MUSIC, AND LITERATURE

Including, but not limited to:

  • The Great Depression - themes about the plight of the poor were reflected in the photography of Dorothea Lange and in literature such as in the works of John Steinbeck (Grapes of Wrath)

STAAR Note:

The Spring 2013 STAAR included changes in fashion that reflected the times, such as 1920’s flappers, 1960’s counterculture, 1980’s “preppy”

The Spring 2015 STAAR included Woodstock festival as an event that showcased protest music
NewUS.28 The student understands how historians use historiography to interpret the past and applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewUS.28A Analyze primary and secondary sources such as maps, graphs, speeches, political cartoons, and artifacts to acquire information to answer historical questions.
Process Standard

Analyze

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION AND ANSWER HISTORICAL QUESITONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Maps
  • Graphs
  • Speeches
  • Political cartoons/broadsides
  • Artifacts
  • Diaries
  • Newspapers/articles
  • Historical documents
STAAR Note:

These skills will be incorporated into STAAR test questions from reporting categories 1-4 and will be identified along with content standards
NewUS.28B Analyze information by applying absolute and relative chronology through sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing and contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations, making predictions, drawing inferences, and drawing conclusions.
Process Standard

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
STAAR Note:

These skills will be incorporated into STAAR test questions from reporting categories 1-4 and will be identified along with content standards.
NewUS.29 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
NewUS.29A Create written, oral, and visual presentations of social studies information using effective communication skills, including proper citations and avoiding plagiarism.

Create

WRITTEN, ORAL, AND VISUAL PRESENTATIONS

Use

EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Correct grammar and punctuation
  • Accurate spelling
  • Clear diction and sentence structure
  • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
NewUS.29B Use social studies terminology correctly.
Process Standard

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY

NewUS.30 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
NewUS.30A Create a visual representation of historical information such as thematic maps, graphs, and charts.

Create

THEMATIC MAPS, GRAPHS, AND CHARTS

NewUS.30B Pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns shown on maps, graphs, charts, and available databases.
Process Standard

Pose, Answer

QUESTIONS ABOUT GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND PATTERNS SHOWN ON MAPS, GRAPHS, CHARTS, MODELS, AND DATABASES

TEKS# SE# Unit Level Developing TEKS Unit Level Specificity
 

Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Readiness as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Supporting as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Process standards as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
NewUS.28 The student understands how historians use historiography to interpret the past and applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
NewUS.28C Apply the process of historical inquiry to research, interpret, and use multiple types of sources of evidence.

Apply

PROCESS OF HISTORICAL INQUIRY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Creating a compelling question
  • Analyzing sources by close reading, contextualizing, sourcing, and corroborating
  • Synthesizing information from sources
  • Developing conclusions based on evidence from sources
  • Reporting conclusions
NewUS.28D Evaluate the validity of a source based on corroboration with other sources and information about the author, including points of view, frames of reference, and historical context.
Process Standard

Evaluate

VALIDITY OF A SOURCE

Including, but not limited to:

  • Corroboration with other sources provides information about what aspects of the source are similar to or different from other sources.
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an author expresses in a document.
  • Information about the author is needed to evaluate the credibility and expertise of the author.
  • Examining historical context or the time in which the author lived, along with frame of reference or the life experiences of the author are important for understanding the influences on the author’s point of view.
NewUS.28E Identify bias and support with historical evidence a point of view on a social studies issue or event.

Identify, Support

POINT OF VIEW

Including, but not limited to:

  • Bias refers to a favoritism towards one way of thinking. All individuals exhibit bias, of which they may or may not be consciously aware.
  • Point of view refers to the historical perspective, claim, or attitude an individual expresses in a document.
  • Historical interpretations, considered as a point of view on a social studies issues or event should be supported by evidence.
NewUS.31 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
NewUS.31A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/19/2019
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