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Instructional Focus Document
Grade 6 Social Studies
TITLE : Unit 05: Empire and Ethnicity: Russia and the Eurasian Republics SUGGESTED DURATION : 10 days

Unit Overview

Introduction

In this unit students study Russia and the former republics of the Soviet Union as a culture region which covers a vast land mass and is home to a variety of ethnic groups.  The region’s history is characterized by the domination of the communist Soviet Union as a Russian empire, which experienced a rise to prominence as a superpower following the Second World War. More recently the Soviet Union underwent political disintegration which resulted in political, economic and social change as well as independence for many former Soviet republics. An examination of Russia and the Eurasian Republics is important for understanding the challenge of politically ruling over a multitude of different cultures and how political changes can affect culture.

Prior to this Unit

Prior to this unit, students learned about the patterns of cultural unity that characterize Europe as a culture region.

During this Unit

In this unit, students study about the pattern of Soviet domination over many ethnic groups during the twentieth century, including the imposition of communism in the region. Additionally, students learn about how reforms to change the Soviet economy eventually resulted in the breakup of the Soviet Union, and the emergence of new political, social and economic patterns in Russia and the former Soviet republics. All social studies skills expectations are included in this unit to support the historical inquiry process that should be incorporated into classroom instruction and assessment.

After this Unit

In the next unit students examine the process of diffusion that characterizes Southwest Asia and North Africa as a culture region.

 


Competition for power over territory, resources, and people leads to tension and conflict.

  • Why have societies not been successful at avoiding conflict?
Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

For most of the twentieth century the communist Soviet Union politically and culturally dominated over a vast territory and a variety of ethnic groups.

  • What modern countries were once controlled by the Soviet Union?
  • How did the Soviet Union come to control Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and parts of Central Asia?
  • What techniques did the Soviet government use to unify culture in their vast territory?
  • What ethnic groups lived within the boundaries of the Soviet Union?
  • What cultural patterns are evident in Russia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia because of cultural diffusion?
  • What was characteristic of the communist economy of the Soviet Union?
  • How does a communist economy operate differently from a free market economy?

Political Patterns

  • Imperialism

Cultural Patterns

  • Ethnicity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Efforts to modernize the Soviet economy eventually resulted in the collapse of communism in the Soviet Union, along with the end of Soviet political control of countries in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia.

  • Why did the Soviet Union try to reform its economy?
  • What new countries formed out of the former Soviet Union?
  • What conflicts resulted from the end of Soviet domination in Eastern Europe and what conflicts continue as Russia moves to dominate again?

Historical Processes

  • Growth/Decay

Spatial Patterns

  • Region/Borders
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Since the breakup of the Soviet Union the political, economic, and social patterns in the region have been in transition.

  • What is characteristic about culture, economics and government in Russia today?
  • What economic and political challenges do the people living in Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia face?

Political Patterns

  • Governmental Systems

Economic Patterns

  • Economic Systems
  • Resources

Cultural Patterns

  • Ethnicity
Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Unit performance tasks are intended to serve as an additional assessment resource, especially for classrooms implementing performance/project based instructional models. Teachers may choose to use performance tasks as one large unit encompassing assessment in conjunction with incorporating the performance assessments as instructional processing activities or as an alternative to administering all of the unit performance assessments.  Please consult the Unit Performance Tasks Best Practices resource for a more in-depth guide to implementation of performance tasks as an assessment tool. 

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

  • Students may think of Russia as a mono-cultural society and may not be aware of the ethnic diversity within Russia, the Caucasus and Central Asia as a region.
  • Students may have little knowledge of the size and scope of the former Soviet Union.

Unit Vocabulary

  • propaganda – the distribution and censorship of written and visual materials that convey a particular message
  • republic – form of government in which people elect representatives to legislate
  • traditional economy – generally refers to an economy based on subsistence farming or customary activities
  • command economy – economy in which the government controls all production and distribution of goods and services
  • socialist economy – economy in which the government owns and operates large-scale companies for the benefit of the public
  • federation – union of self-governing states

Related Vocabulary

  • transition
  • ethnicity
  • limited government
  • unlimited government
  • factors of production
  • subsistence farming
Unit Assessment Items System Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.


TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
New6.1 The student understands that historical events influence contemporary events. The student is expected to:
New6.1A Trace characteristics of various contemporary societies in regions that resulted from historical events or factors such as colonization, immigration, and trade.

Trace

CHARACTERISTICS OF SOCIETIES THAT RESULTED FROM HISTORICAL EVENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics
    • Politically Russia today is a republic with four major parties in elections; effect of the introduction of democratic ideas to the communist-controlled Soviet Union during the 20th century; communism spread to Russia as a result of a revolution and civil war
    • Russia is industrialized, which was instituted by the communist regime in response to Russia’s loss in World War I, which exemplified economic deficits in comparison to the nations of Western Europe; Eurasian Republics economic activities are centered on mineral and oil extraction; region has a history of exploitation by the former Soviet Union
    • Region is ethnically and linguistically diverse with Russians, Uzbeks, Turks, Tajiks, Ukrainians, along with many other Slavic, Turkic and Caucasian groups, a reflection of the paths of historic migration through the region and influence of nomadic groups
    • Many in Russia are members of the Eastern Orthodox Christian Church of Russia, second-largest Christian church next to the Roman Catholic Church in number of followers, which spread to the region via Eastern Europe after the split with the Roman Catholic Church; in the central Asian republics such as Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan Islam is predominate because of the historical spread of the religion to this area by nomadic tribes
New6.1B Analyze the historical background of various contemporary societies to evaluate relationships between past conflicts and current conditions.

Analyze

HISTORICAL BACKGROUNDS OF SOCIETIES

Evaluate

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PAST CONFLICTS AND CURRENT CONDITIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics- Cold War rivalries contributed to the spread of communism to Eastern Europe; the collapse of the Soviet Union, the fall of communism, and the end of the Cold War led to independence for the Eurasian Republics.
New6.3 The student understands the factors that influence the locations and characteristics of locations of various contemporary societies on maps and/or globes. The student is expected to:
New6.3B Explain ways in which human migration influences the character of places and regions.

Explain

HUMAN MIGRATION INFLUENCES THE CHARATER OF PLACES AND REGIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Character of a place refers to the political, economic, social and cultural characteristics that distinguish a particular place.
  • Migration generally results in a modification of cultures and the cultural landscape along with possible cultural tensions.
  • Russia and Eurasian Republics
    • Russians were encouraged to migrate to other republics to spread Russian culture; other ethnicities were forcibly moved to make them easier to control. Resulted in a multi-cultural society, with Russian culture and language dominating
New6.3C Identify and locate major physical and human geographic features such as landforms, water bodies, and urban centers of various places and regions.

Identify, Locate

PHYSICAL AND HUMAN GEOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF VARIOUS PLACES AND REGIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and Eurasian Republics
    • Landforms – Ural Mountains, Caucasus Mountains, Siberia, East European Plain
    • Water bodies – Arctic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Caspian Sea, Black Sea, Aral Sea, Lake Baikal, Volga River, Lena River, Ob River
    • Urban centers – Moscow, Kiev, Omsk
New6.3D Identify the location of major world countries for each of the world regions.

Identify

LOCATION OF MAJOR WORLD COUNTRIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics
    • Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine
New6.6 The student understands the factors of production in a society's economy. The student is expected to:
New6.6A Describe ways in which the factors of production (natural resources, labor, capital, and entrepreneurs) influence the economies of various contemporary societies.

Describe

WAYS FACTORS OF PRODUCTION INFLUENCE ECONOMIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics
    • The region is characterized by a variety of economic development with Russia being industrialized/developed. The region has access to natural resources and labor. Capital has generally come from foreign investors, especially from Europe. Entrepreneurs are new to the economic system in the region following the collapse of the communist economic systems that characterized the region prior to the 1990s.
New6.7 The student understands the various ways in which people organize economic systems. The student is expected to:
New6.7A Compare ways in which various societies organize the production and distribution of goods and services.

Compare

WAYS IN WHICH SOCIETIES ORGANIZE PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Traditional economies – Custom and tradition determines what is to be produced; products are owned by families, or the entire village. Distribution of goods and services are kept locally.
  • Free market capitalism – Production and distribution of goods and services is based on private ownership and response to consumer demand.
  • Socialism – The government owns some factors of production, usually the major industries along with private ownership of some businesses.
  • Communism – National ownership of all production and distribution of goods and services.
  • Command economy – State directs the economic system, central government controls industry, such as in Cuba and North Korea.
New6.7B Compare and contrast free enterprise, socialist, and communist economies in various contemporary societies, including the benefits of the U.S. free enterprise system.

Compare, Contrast

FREE ENTERPRISE, SOCIALIST, AND COMMUNIST ECONOMIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • A free enterprise system is a market economy where independent producers supply goods and services in response to consumer demand. Both supply and demand are affected by prices. The system has four characteristics: economic freedom, voluntary exchange, private property, and profit motive.  
  • A socialist system is a market economy in which government owns some factors of production yet private ownership of small scale business is allowed.
  • A communist system is characterized by collective or state ownership of the means of production. Government, rather than individuals, owns and controls all resources and economic decision, resulting in no economic freedom, no private ownership and no profit motive.
New6.9 The student understands the concepts of limited and unlimited governments. The student is expected to:
New6.9A Describe and compare examples of limited and unlimited governments such as constitutional (limited) and totalitarian (unlimited).

Describe, Compare

EXAMPLES OF LIMITED AND UNLIMITED GOVERNMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • In a limited government led by the citizens, everyone, including all authority figures, must obey the laws. Constitutions, statements of rights, or other laws define the limits of those in power, so leaders cannot take advantage of their elected, appointed, or inherited positions.
    • Examples include:  
      • United States and Canada
      • Most South American countries
      • Most European nations
      • Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia
      • Israel, Turkey, Tunisia
      • Japan, South Korea
      • Australia, New Zealand
  • In an unlimited government, control is placed solely with the ruler and his/her appointees, and there are no limits imposed on his/her authority.
    • Examples include; North Korea totalitarian rule, Saudi Arabia absolute monarchy, Qatar absolute monarchy, Cuba under leadership of Castro brothers. Some countries that may hold elections but impose one political party, such as China, Laos and Vietnam.
New6.9B Identify reasons for limiting the power of government.

Identify

REASONS FOR LIMITING THE POWER OF GOVERNMENT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Protect human rights
  • Promote economic freedom
  • Provide equity and opportunity for all citizens
  • Ensure peaceful transitions of power
New6.10 The student understands various ways in which people organize governments. The student is expected to:
New6.10A Identify and give examples of governments with rule by one, few, or many.

Identify, Give examples

GOVERNMENTS WITH RULE BY ONE, FEW, OR MANY

Including, but not limited to:

  • Rule by one – monarchy or dictatorship
    • A single ruler controls the government and claims authority based on divine or hereditary right. Dictators or despots also maintain complete control of government in their countries. (unlimited government)
      • Examples: Cuba, North Korea, Syria, Zimbabwe, Qatar, Saudi Arabia
  • Rule by a few – small group has power; oligarchy
    • Government with rule by a few also occurs when a group of persons seize power after an overthrow of the previous government. The new rulers constitute a junta. (usually an unlimited government)
      • Examples: Iran, Nepal, Vietnam, China, Russian Federation
  • Rule by many – people have power
    • A government ruled by many is generally a democratic republic. (limited government)
    • Examples: United States, Germany, Israel, Argentina, Brazil, Peru, Japan, South Korea, The Philippines, Thailand
New6.10B Compare ways in which various societies such as China, Germany, India, and Russia organize government and how they function.

Compare

WAYS VARIOUS SOCIETIES ORGANIZE GOVERNMENT AND HOW THEY FUNCTION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Ways societies organize government
    • Federal systems are distinguished by a constitution that divides power between a central governmental authority and smaller regional subdivisions of government, such as states or provinces. The United States, Canada, India, and Germany are examples of federal systems.
    • Unitary systems are characterized by a national government performing all government functions. Subnational units may have some authority within their regions, but their powers are limited by the national government.  Examples of unitary systems include, Great Britain, France, Japan, and People’s Republic of China. Russia is organized as a federation of states, yet the concentration of power at the national level results in Russia operating more as a unitary system.
  • How governments function
    • Governments must perform legislative, executive, and judicial duties. Some government divide these duties between three branches. In parliamentary systems, such as in Canada and Great Britain the executive and legislative branches tend to merge.
    • Governments create bureaucracies or agencies of non-elected officials who carry out administrative functions of the government, such as collecting taxes, enforcing regulations, and providing security.
New6.13 The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in various world societies. The student is expected to:
New6.13D Identify and explain examples of conflict and cooperation between and among cultures.

Identify, Explain

EXAMPLES OF CONFLICT AND COOPERATION BETWEEN AND AMONG CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics
    • Various ethnic conflicts in the former Yugoslavian republic
    • Chechens and Russians following the collapse of the Soviet Union as an example of conflict
    • Conflict in Ukraine led by some rebel factions wanting to reunite under Russian control
New6.15 The student understands relationships that exist among world cultures. The student is expected to:
New6.15D Identify the impact of cultural diffusion on individuals and world societies.

Identify

IMPACT OF CULTURAL DIFFUSION ON INDIVIDUALS AND WORLD SOCIETIES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Russia and the Eurasian Republics
    • Cultural diffusion spread Eastern Orthodox religion to Russia and Eastern Europe and Islam to central Asian republics and Caucasus region.
    • Since the fall of the Soviet Union cultural diffusion is responsible for exposing Russians to western music, clothing and popular culture. 
New6.19 The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired through established research methodologies from a variety of valid sources, including technology. The student is expected to:
New6.19A Differentiate between, locate, and use valid primary and secondary sources such as oral, print, and visual material, and artifacts to acquire information about various world cultures.

Differentiate between, Locate, Use

VALID PRIMARY AND SECONDARY SOURCES TO ACQUIRE INFORMATION ABOUT VARIOUS WORLD CULTURES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Oral materials
  • Print materials
  • Visual material
  • Artifacts
New6.19B Analyze information by sequencing, categorizing, identifying cause-and-effect relationships, comparing, contrasting, finding the main idea, summarizing, making generalizations and predictions, and drawing inferences and conclusions.

Analyze

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Sequencing refers to the practice of arranging items in a specific order. Most commonly in social studies this is done with events either sequenced by absolute chronology or exact date of by relative chronology or placing events in chronological order without necessarily identifying exact dates
  • Categorizing refers to the practice of placing items in particular groups.
  • Identifying cause-and-effect relationships is a common skill applied in historical analysis to examine change over time.
  • Comparing and contrasting refers to examination of similarities and differences.
  • Finding the main idea is a literacy skill applied to the examination most often of textual and visual sources.
  • Summarizing is a literacy skill utilized to condense information to a concise version.
  • Making generalizations and predictions is facilitated by the examination of patterns. Generalizations are general statements that should be based on the evidence presented by patterns and predictions can be made based on that pattern.
  • Drawing inferences and conclusions results from examining evidence and articulating interpretations of that evidence.
New6.19C Organize and interpret information from outlines, reports, databases, and visuals, including graphs, charts, timelines, and maps.

Organize, Interpret

INFORMATION

Including, but not limited to:

  • Outlines
  • Reports
  • Databases
  • Visuals
    • Graphs
    • Charts
    • Timelines
    • Maps
New6.19D Identify different points of view about an issue or current topic.

Identify

DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW ABOUT AN ISSUE OR CURRENT TOPIC
New6.20 The student uses geographic tools to collect, analyze, and interpret data. The student is expected to:
New6.20A Answer geographic questions, including: Where is it located? Why is it there? What is significant about its location? How is its location related to the location of other people, places, and environments? Using latitude and longitude, where is it located?

Answer

GEOGRAPHIC QUESTIONS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Where is it located? Position on a map (absolute location vs. relative location), latitude and longitude
  • Why is it there? trade routes, altitude, availability of natural resources, transportation corridor
  • What is significant about its location? historically, economically, socially, politically
  • How is its location related to other people, places, and environment? conflicts, cultural diffusion, climate, availability of resources
  • Where do people live and not live? Why?
  • How does geography affect migration patterns?
  • What patterns are evident in the demographic make-up, language distribution, and distribution of religious groups in the world?
New6.20B Pose and answer questions about geographic distributions and patterns for various world regions and countries shown on maps, graphs, and charts.

Pose, Answer

QUESTIONS ABOUT GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTIONS AND PATTERNS

Including, but not limited to:
Possible questions to pose related to any region of study.

  • How does climate affect settlement patterns (where people live) in this region/country?
  • How does physical geography affect settlement patterns (where people live) and migration patterns (where people move to and from) in this region/country?
  • How does physical geography facilitate/impede trade in this region/country?
  • How has physical geography affected the spread of languages, religions and ethnic groups?
New6.20C Compare various world regions and countries using data from maps, graphs, and charts.

Compare

WORLD REGIONS AND COUNTRIES

Including, but not limited to:
Possible comparisons to make

  • Levels of development
  • Standard of living
  • Voting participation
  • Types of economic activities
  • Levels of education
  • Gross domestic product
  • Settlement patterns over time
  • Demographics
  • Literacy rates
New6.20D Create and interpret regional sketch maps, thematic maps, graphs, and charts depicting aspects such as population, disease, and economic activities of various world regions and countries.

Create, Interpret

REGIONAL SKETCH MAPS, THEMATIC MAPS, GRAPHS, CHARTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Creation of regional sketch maps by students
  • Thematic maps may depict population patterns, climate regions, language distribution, religious patterns, ethnic patterns, economic activities
  • Charts and graphs may depict birth rate, death rate, population growth rate, life expectancy, literacy level, GDP, average family size
New6.21 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
New6.21A Use social studies terminology correctly.

Use

SOCIAL STUDIES TERMINOLOGY CORRECTLY

New6.21B Incorporate main and supporting ideas in verbal and written communication based on research.

Incorporate

MAIN, AND SUPPORTING IDEAS IN VERBAL AND WRITTEN COMMUNICATION BASED ON RESEARCH

New6.21D Create written and visual material such as journal entries, reports, graphic organizers, outlines, and bibliographies based on research.

Create

WRITTEN AND VISUAL MATERIAL BASED ON RESEARCH

Including, but not limited to:

  • Journal entries
  • Reports
  • Graphic organizers
  • Outlines
  • Bibliographies
New6.21E Use effective written communication skills, including proper citations to avoid plagiarism.

Use

EFFECTIVE WRITTEN COMMUNICATION SKILLS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Correct grammar and punctuation
  • Accurate spelling
  • Clear diction and sentence structure
  • Proper citations to avoid plagiarism
DEVELOPING TEKS

TEKS that need continued practice, improvement, and refinement, but do not necessarily need to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
New6.21 The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
New6.21C Express ideas orally based on research and experiences.

Express

IDEAS ORALLY BASED ON RESEARCH AND EXPERIENCES

New6.22 The student uses problem-solving and decision-making skills, working independently and with others. The student is expected to:
New6.22A Use problem-solving and decision-making processes to identify a problem, gather information, list and consider options, consider advantages and disadvantages, choose and implement a solution, and evaluate the effectiveness of the solution.

Use

PROBLEM-SOLVING AND DECISION-MAKING PROCESSES

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify a problem
  • Gather information
  • List and consider options
  • Consider advantages and disadvantages
  • Choose and implement a solution
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the solution
The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 06/17/2019
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