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Instructional Focus Document
English II
TITLE : Unit 05B: College and Career Connections SUGGESTED DURATION : 11 days

Unit Overview

This unit bundles student expectations that address word study, reading and writing of expository and procedural texts, with a focus on college and career connections. The goal of this unit is to provide students the skills to analyze and use information in procedural and expository text by making inferences and drawing complex conclusions about ideas presented. Analysis of informational texts facilitates the understanding and use of unique structures and organizational patterns in reading and writing. Various forms of informational texts continue to provide the avenue for the practice of making inferences, summarizing, synthesizing, and providing textual evidence during reading. Students read fictional text independently to deepen understanding of theme, genre, structure, and elements.   

In Unit 05A, students made connections within and across genres. During this unit, students read and write college and work-related documents such as instructions, emails, correspondences, memos and project plans. Students continue the examination of informational text in order to explain the controlling ideas and specific purposes of expository texts. Students analyze and reflect upon fictional text read independently. Word study is supported in the context of reading and writing. In Unit 06, students formulate research to address an American political issue and follow a plan to compile data from reliable, valid, and accurate sources in order to make judgments about what is relevant and credible.


Unit Understandings
and Questions
Overarching Concepts
and Unit Concepts
Performance Assessment(s)

Authors choose structure to convey information and enhance understanding.

Interpretation – Information

Structure – Graphics (Maps, Charts, Schematics)

Purpose – To Instruct

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Authors choose structure to convey information and enhance understanding.

Form – Expository Text, Summary

Interpretation – Information and Understanding

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

Authors gather information from different sources for specific purposes.

Form – Expository Text, Summary

Interpretation – Information, Understanding

Readers infer meaning about a variety of texts using textual evidence to support ideas.

Interpretation – Connections, Understanding

Assessment information provided within the TEKS Resource System are examples that may, or may not, be used by your child’s teacher. In accordance with section 26.006 (2) of the Texas Education Code, "A parent is entitled to review each test administered to the parent’s child after the test is administered." For more information regarding assessments administered to your child, please visit with your child’s teacher.

MISCONCEPTIONS / UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS

UNDERDEVELOPED CONCEPTS:

  • Reading to obtain information and writing to inform are basic requirements of daily life for most adults. Advanced levels of reading informational text require continual instruction and scaffolding.

Unit Vocabulary

  • Summarizeto reduce large sections of text to their essential points and main ideas. Note: It is still important to attribute summarized ideas to the original.
  • Subtle inference – readers make inferences by drawing conclusions, making generalizations, and making predictions. A subtle inference is one in which the bits of information are not as easily connected
  • Drawing conclusionsa form of inference in which the reader gathers information, considers the general thoughts or ideas that emerge from the information, and comes to a decision. The conclusion is generally based on more than one piece of information
  • Procedural text – a type of informational text that is written with the intent to explain the steps in the procedure, as in a recipe. Procedural text could house data that requires reader interpretation.
  • Synthesize – combine elements and parts to form a coherent whole 
Unit Assessment Items System Resources Other Resources

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Unit Assessment Items that have been published by your district may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources tab. Assessment items may also be found using the Assessment Center if your district has granted access to that tool.

System Resources may be accessed through Search All Components in the District Resources Tab.

  • None identified

This chart provides an organizational structure for the TEKS included in this unit. Ongoing TEKS may be reviewed during whole group and small group instruction or applied by students through meaningful practice.

Instructional Components Chart (*ELAR / SLAR Only')

Instructional Components TEKS Ongoing TEKS Formative Assessment Examples

Word Study

Ongoing TEKS
Vocabulary Development: E2.1A, E2.1B, E2.1C, E2.1D, E2.1E

Observation Data

Teacher - Student Conference

Checklist

Rubric

Reader’s Notebook

Writer’s Notebook

Vocabulary Notebook

Oral Quiz

Written Quiz

Portfolio

Reading

TEKS
Culture and History: E2.8A
Expository Text: E2.9A, E2.9C
Procedural Texts: E2.11A, E2.11B
Gathering Sources: E2.21B
Listening: E2.24B
Comprehension Skills: E2.Fig19B
Ongoing TEKS
Vocabulary Development: E2.1B, E2.1E
Theme and Genre: E2.2A
Fiction: E2.5A, E2.5B, E2.5C, E2.5D
Sensory Language: E2.7A, E2.15C.i
Gathering Sources: E2.21C
Teamwork: E2.26A
Comprehension Skills: E2.Fig19A

Writing

TEKS
Procedural Texts: E2.15B.i, E2.15B.ii, E2.15B.iii
Ongoing TEKS
Writing Process: E2.13A, E2.13B, E2.13C, E2.13D, E2.13E
Conventions: E2.17B, E2.17C
Handwriting, Capitalization, and Punctuation: E2.18A, E2.18B.i
Spelling: E2.19A
Teamwork: E2.26A
The phase 2 College Readiness English Language Arts and Reading vertical alignment team found that the College Readiness Standards in English Language Arts and Reading are well aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills.
TAUGHT DIRECTLY TEKS

TEKS intended to be explicitly taught in this unit.

TEKS/SE Legend:

  • Knowledge and Skills Statements (TEKS) identified by TEA are in italicized, bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) identified by TEA are in bolded, black text.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Readiness as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Student Expectations (TEKS) are labeled Supporting as identified by TEA of the assessed curriculum.
  • Portions of the Student Expectations (TEKS) that are not included in this unit but are taught in previous or future units are indicated by a strike-through.

Specificity Legend:

  • Supporting information / clarifications (specificity) written by TEKS Resource System are in blue text.
  • Definitions from Standards for Ensuring Success from Kindergarten to College and Career Spring 2012 Update, 2012 Texas Education Agency / University of Texas System are in bolded, blue text.
  • Unit-specific clarifications are in italicized, blue text.
  • Information from Texas Education Agency (TEA) is labeled.
  • A Partial Specificity label indicates that a portion of the specificity not aligned to this unit has been removed.
TEKS# SE# TEKS SPECIFICITY
E2.Fig19 Reading/Comprehension Skills. Students use a flexible range of metacognitive reading skills in both assigned and independent reading to understand an author’s message. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater depth in increasingly more complex texts as they become self-directed, critical readers. The student is expected to:
TxCCRS CDS.I.D - Cross-Disciplinary Standards/Key Cognitive Skills. Academic behaviors
TxCCRS CDS.II.A - Cross-Disciplinary Standards/Foundational Skills. Reading across the curriculum
E2.Fig19B Make complex inferences about text and use textual evidence to support understanding.
Readiness Standard (Fiction, Expository)
Supporting Standard (Literary Nonfiction, Poetry, and Drama, Persuasive)

Make

COMPLEX INFERENCES ABOUT TEXT

Including, but not limited to:
Literary Text (e.g., poetry, drama, fiction, literary nonfiction)

  • Structural elements
  • Literary elements
  • Sensory language
  • Figurative language
  • Purpose of elements and language in sections of text and/or specific sentences

Note:
Refer to the specificity of the Knowledge and Skills Statements for each literary genre for additional information on inferring in each type of literary text.

Informational Text (e.g., expository, persuasive, embedded procedural text/graphics)

  • Purpose of informational text
  • Main idea of whole texts and sections of texts
  • Details that support the central idea or controlling idea

Note:
Refer to the specificity of the Knowledge and Skills Statements for each informational genre for additional information on inferring in each type of informational text.

Inference – a logical guess made by connecting bits of information. Readers make inferences by drawing conclusions, making generalizations, and making predictions.

Complex inference – uses inductive and deductive reasoning

Including, but not limited to:

  • Inductive reasoning – the process of determining general principles by logic or observation from specific data; reasoning from parts to whole (e.g., all ice I’ve ever felt is cold; therefore, all ice is cold)
  • Deductive reasoning – the process of logical reasoning from general principles to specific instances based on the assumed truth of the principle; reasoning from wholes to parts

Drawing conclusions – a form of inference in which the reader gathers information, considers the general thoughts or ideas that emerge from the information, and comes to a decision. The conclusion is generally based on more than one piece of information.

Use

TEXTUAL EVIDENCE TO SUPPORT UNDERSTANDING

Generalization – a straight-forward statement about a group/class of persons, places, things, events supported by information

STAAR Note:
Paired passage questions associated with (TEKS number) assess similarities and differences in topic, overarching ideas, details, theme, mood, tone, organization, and purpose within or across texts of various genres (e.g., expository-expository, expository-fiction, poem-expository, persuasive-poem). Making connections may require inferential thinking.

E2.8 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Culture and History.

Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about the author's purpose in cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

Analyze, Make inferences, Draw conclusions

ABOUT THE AUTHOR’S PURPOSE IN CULTURAL, HISTORICAL, AND CONTEMPORARY CONTEXTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Determine the purpose of an entire informational text
  • Determine the purpose of a section(s) of an informational text
  • Determine the purpose of a specific sentence from an informational text
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions within cultural and historical contexts

Possible verbs to describe purpose:

  • To inform, explain,  demonstrate, reveal, teach, communicate, establish, document
  • To illustrate, show, describe, indicate, clarify
  • To compare, contrast
  • To provide, give information/examples
  • To persuade, express an opinion, prove, encourage, argue, establish, convince, promote
  • To reinforce (an idea), emphasize, call attention to
  • To suggest, imply
  • To celebrate, recognize
  • To question, criticize, analyze

Provide

EVIDENCE FROM TEXT TO SUPPORT THEIR UNDERSTANDING

STAAR Note: 
This Knowledge and Skills Statement may be assessed with Figure 19B.

TxCCRS E/LAS.II.C - English/Language Arts/Reading. Describe, analyze, and evaluate information within and across literary and other texts from a variety of cultures and historical periods.
E2.8A Analyze the controlling idea and specific purpose of a passage and the textual elements that support and elaborate it, including both the most important details and the less important details.
Readiness Standard

Focus instruction on analyzing the specific purpose of a passage. Analysis of the controlling idea was taught in previous units and may be reviewed as applicable.

Analyze

THE CONTROLLING IDEA AND SPECIFIC PURPOSE OF A PASSAGE AND THE TEXTUAL ELEMENTS THAT SUPPORT AND ELABORATE IT

Controlling idea – the main point or underlying direction of a piece of writing. A controlling idea makes the reader ask a question that will be answered by reading more or helps the reader understand the author's purpose for writing the paragraph or essay.

Including, but not limited to:
Steps in analysis:

  • Identify the controlling idea
  • Identify the specific purpose
  • Identify the most important details
  • Identify the less important details
  • Explain how the details support and elaborate the controlling idea
  • Explain how the details support and elaborate the author’s purpose
STAAR Note:
Refer to the specificity in the Knowledge and Skills Statement to gain additional information about how author’s purpose may be assessed on STAAR.
E2.9 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Expository Text.

Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about expository text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Students are expected to:

Analyze, Make inferences, Draw conclusions

ABOUT EXPOSITORY TEXT

Including, but not limited to:

  • Make inferences related to the whole text including the thesis/controlling idea and other key ideas
  • Make inferences related to a section of the text
  • Make inferences related to particular sentences, ideas, or details

Provide

EVIDENCE FROM TEXT TO SUPPORT THEIR UNDERSTANDING

Including, but not limited to:

  • Identify text evidence that supports inferences in expository texts

 

STAAR Note: 
This Knowledge and Skills Statement may be assessed with Figure 19B.

TxCCRS E/LAS.II.A - English/Language Arts/Reading. Locate explicit textual information and draw complex inferences, analyze, and evaluate the information within and across texts of varying lengths.
E2.9A Summarize text and distinguish between a summary and a critique and identify non-essential information in a summary and unsubstantiated opinions in a critique.
Readiness Standard

Focus instruction on summarizing text. Distinguishing between a summary and a critique was taught in previous units and may be reviewed as applicable.

Summarize

TEXT

Summary includes, but is not limited to:

  • Brief, coherent sentences that communicate the key information in logical order
  • Should only contain the most important, relevant details and exclude extraneous, less important details 

Summarize – to reduce large sections of text to their essential points and main ideas. Note: It is still important to attribute summarized ideas to the original source.

Distinguish

BETWEEN A SUMMARY AND A CRITIQUE

Critique – holds and/or expresses opinions, takes a position

Identify

NON-ESSENTIAL INFORMATION IN A SUMMARY AND UNSUBSTANTIATED OPINIONS IN A CRITIQUE

Non-essential information – less important, extraneous information 

Unsubstantiated – has not been verified, proven, or confirmed

E2.9C Make and defend subtle inferences and complex conclusions about the ideas in text and their organizational patterns.
Readiness Standard

Focus instruction on making and defending subtle inferences about the ideas in text. Making complex conclusions and inferences about organizational patterns was taught in previous units and may be reviewed as applicable.

Make, Defend

SUBTLE INFERENCES AND COMPLEX CONCLUSIONS ABOUT THE IDEAS IN TEXT AND THEIR ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERNS

Subtle inference – readers make inferences by drawing conclusions, making generalizations, and making predictions. A subtle inference is one in which the bits of information are not as easily connected.

Drawing conclusions – a form of inference in which the reader gathers information, considers the general thoughts or ideas that emerge from the information, and comes to a decision. The conclusion is generally based on more than one piece of information.

Organizational pattern – the pattern an author constructs as he or she organizes his or her ideas and provides supporting details. Examples of commonly used patterns are cause and effect, problem and solution, description, and order of importance.

Including, but not limited to:

  • Defend with textual evidence, credible sources, and/or background knowledge and experience

Note:

  • Organizational patterns can be found in sections of text (single or multiple paragraphs) or throughout an entire text.
  • Refer to E1.Fig19B for related comprehension skills.

STAAR Note:
Some questions may ask students to consider the connection between organizational patterns and author’s purpose.

E2.11 Reading/Comprehension of Informational Text/Procedural Texts.

Students understand how to glean and use information in procedural texts and documents. Students are expected to:

Understand, Glean, Use

INFORMATION IN PROCEDURAL TEXTS AND DOCUMENTS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Determine the purpose of embedded procedural texts and graphics
  • Interpret information and details within procedural texts and graphics

STAAR Note: 
This Knowledge and Skills Statement may be assessed with Figure 19B.

E2.11A Evaluate text for the clarity of its graphics and its visual appeal.
Supporting Standard

Evaluate

TEXT FOR THE CLARITY OF ITS GRAPHICS AND ITS VISUAL APPEAL

Including, but not limited to:
Steps in evaluation

  • Identify the purpose of the graphic(s)
  • Analyze the visual appeal and clarity of the graphic(s)
  • Explain how the visual(s) and graphic(s) support the text

Procedural text – a type of informational text that is written with the intent to explain the steps in the procedure, as in a recipe. Procedural text could house data that requires reader interpretation.

Possible examples of images may include:

  • Map
  • Chart
  • Illustration/Drawing
  • Photograph
  • Graph
  • Timeline
  • Table
  • Diagram
  • Infographic

 

E2.11B Synthesize information from multiple graphical sources to draw conclusions about the ideas presented (e.g., maps, charts, schematics).
Supporting Standard

Synthesize

INFORMATION FROM MULTIPLE GRAPHICAL SOURCES

Synthesize – combine elements and parts to form a coherent whole 

Including, but not limited to:
Steps in synthesis

  • Identify the graphical sources
  • Determine the visual appeal and effectiveness of the graphical sources
  • Explain how the visuals and graphics clarified the text

Including, but not limited to:

  • Maps
  • Charts
  • Schematics

Other possible examples of graphic sources:

  • Illustrations
  • Graphs
  • Timelines
  • Tables
  • Diagrams

To draw conclusions

ABOUT THE IDEAS PRESENTED

Drawing conclusions – a form of inference in which the reader gathers information, considers the general thoughts or ideas that emerge from the information, and comes to a decision. The conclusion is generally based on more than one piece of information.

E2.15 Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
TxCCRS E/LAS.I.A - English/Language Arts/Writing. Compose a variety of texts that demonstrate clear focus, the logical development of ideas in well-organized paragraphs, and the use of appropriate language that advances the author's purpose.
TxCCRS CDS.II.B - Cross-Disciplinary Standards/Foundational Skills. Writing across the curriculum
E2.15B Write procedural or work-related documents (e.g., instructions, e-mails, correspondence, memos, project plans) that include:

Write

PROCEDURAL OR WORK-RELATED DOCUMENTS

Refer to the Performance Indicators for instructional considerations.

Including, but not limited to:

  • Instructions
  • E-mails
  • Correspondence
  • Memos
  • Project plans
E2.15B.i organized and accurately conveyed information
E2.15B.ii reader-friendly formatting techniques

Including, but not limited to:

  • Headings, subheadings
  • Graphics
E2.15B.iii anticipation of readers' questions
E2.21 Research/Gathering Sources. Students determine, locate, and explore the full range of relevant sources addressing a research question and systematically record the information they gather. Students are expected to:
TxCCRS

E/LAS.V.B1 - English/Language Arts/Research. Gather relevant sources.

TxCCRS

E/LAS.V.B4 - English/Language Arts/Research. Use source material ethically.

E2.21B Organize information gathered from multiple sources to create a variety of graphics and forms (e.g., notes, learning logs).

Organize

INFORMATION GATHERED FROM MULTIPLE SOURCES

To create

A VARIETY OF GRAPHICS AND FORMS

Including, but not limited to:

  • Notes
  • Learning logs

Other possible examples:

  • Outlines
  • Concept maps
  • Charts
  • Diagrams
  • Timelines
E2.24 Listening and Speaking/Listening. Students will use comprehension skills to listen attentively to others in formal and informal settings. Students will continue to apply earlier standards with greater complexity. Students are expected to:
TxCCRS E/LAS.IV.B - English/Language Arts/Listening. Listen effectively in informal and formal situations.
E2.24B Follow and give complex oral instructions to perform specific tasks, answer questions, solve problems, and complete processes.

Follow, Give

COMPLEX ORAL INSTRUCTIONS TO

  • PERFORM TASKS
  • ANSWER QUESTIONS
  • SOLVE PROBLEMS
  • COMPLETE PROCESSES

Complex instructions – instructions with a number of intricate parts

The English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS), as required by 19 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 74, Subchapter A, §74.4, outline English language proficiency level descriptors and student expectations for English language learners (ELLs). School districts are required to implement ELPS as an integral part of each subject in the required curriculum.

School districts shall provide instruction in the knowledge and skills of the foundation and enrichment curriculum in a manner that is linguistically accommodated commensurate with the student’s levels of English language proficiency to ensure that the student learns the knowledge and skills in the required curriculum.


School districts shall provide content-based instruction including the cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills in subsection (c) of the ELPS in a manner that is linguistically accommodated to help the student acquire English language proficiency.

http://ritter.tea.state.tx.us/rules/tac/chapter074/ch074a.html#74.4 


Choose appropriate ELPS to support instruction.

ELPS# Subsection C: Cross-curricular second language acquisition essential knowledge and skills.
Click here to collapse or expand this section.
ELPS.c.1 The ELL uses language learning strategies to develop an awareness of his or her own learning processes in all content areas. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.1A use prior knowledge and experiences to understand meanings in English
ELPS.c.1B monitor oral and written language production and employ self-corrective techniques or other resources
ELPS.c.1C use strategic learning techniques such as concept mapping, drawing, memorizing, comparing, contrasting, and reviewing to acquire basic and grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.1D speak using learning strategies such as requesting assistance, employing non-verbal cues, and using synonyms and circumlocution (conveying ideas by defining or describing when exact English words are not known)
ELPS.c.1E internalize new basic and academic language by using and reusing it in meaningful ways in speaking and writing activities that build concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.1F use accessible language and learn new and essential language in the process
ELPS.c.1G demonstrate an increasing ability to distinguish between formal and informal English and an increasing knowledge of when to use each one commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.1H develop and expand repertoire of learning strategies such as reasoning inductively or deductively, looking for patterns in language, and analyzing sayings and expressions commensurate with grade-level learning expectations.
ELPS.c.2 The ELL listens to a variety of speakers including teachers, peers, and electronic media to gain an increasing level of comprehension of newly acquired language in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in listening. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.2A distinguish sounds and intonation patterns of English with increasing ease
ELPS.c.2B recognize elements of the English sound system in newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters
ELPS.c.2C learn new language structures, expressions, and basic and academic vocabulary heard during classroom instruction and interactions
ELPS.c.2D monitor understanding of spoken language during classroom instruction and interactions and seek clarification as needed
ELPS.c.2E use visual, contextual, and linguistic support to enhance and confirm understanding of increasingly complex and elaborated spoken language
ELPS.c.2F listen to and derive meaning from a variety of media such as audio tape, video, DVD, and CD ROM to build and reinforce concept and language attainment
ELPS.c.2G understand the general meaning, main points, and important details of spoken language ranging from situations in which topics, language, and contexts are familiar to unfamiliar
ELPS.c.2H understand implicit ideas and information in increasingly complex spoken language commensurate with grade-level learning expectations
ELPS.c.2I demonstrate listening comprehension of increasingly complex spoken English by following directions, retelling or summarizing spoken messages, responding to questions and requests, collaborating with peers, and taking notes commensurate with content and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.3 The ELL speaks in a variety of modes for a variety of purposes with an awareness of different language registers (formal/informal) using vocabulary with increasing fluency and accuracy in language arts and all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in speaking. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.3A practice producing sounds of newly acquired vocabulary such as long and short vowels, silent letters, and consonant clusters to pronounce English words in a manner that is increasingly comprehensible
ELPS.c.3B expand and internalize initial English vocabulary by learning and using high-frequency English words necessary for identifying and describing people, places, and objects, by retelling simple stories and basic information represented or supported by pictures, and by learning and using routine language needed for classroom communication
ELPS.c.3C speak using a variety of grammatical structures, sentence lengths, sentence types, and connecting words with increasing accuracy and ease as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3D speak using grade-level content area vocabulary in context to internalize new English words and build academic language proficiency
ELPS.c.3E share information in cooperative learning interactions
ELPS.c.3F ask and give information ranging from using a very limited bank of high-frequency, high-need, concrete vocabulary, including key words and expressions needed for basic communication in academic and social contexts, to using abstract and content-based vocabulary during extended speaking assignments
ELPS.c.3G express opinions, ideas, and feelings ranging from communicating single words and short phrases to participating in extended discussions on a variety of social and grade-appropriate academic topics
ELPS.c.3H narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.3I adapt spoken language appropriately for formal and informal purposes
ELPS.c.3J respond orally to information presented in a wide variety of print, electronic, audio, and visual media to build and reinforce concept and language attainment.
ELPS.c.4 The ELL reads a variety of texts for a variety of purposes with an increasing level of comprehension in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in reading. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across the foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations apply to text read aloud for students not yet at the stage of decoding written text. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.4A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language and decode (sound out) words using a combination of skills such as recognizing sound-letter relationships and identifying cognates, affixes, roots, and base words
ELPS.c.4B recognize directionality of English reading such as left to right and top to bottom
ELPS.c.4C develop basic sight vocabulary, derive meaning of environmental print, and comprehend English vocabulary and language structures used routinely in written classroom materials
ELPS.c.4D use prereading supports such as graphic organizers, illustrations, and pretaught topic-related vocabulary and other prereading activities to enhance comprehension of written text
ELPS.c.4E read linguistically accommodated content area material with a decreasing need for linguistic accommodations as more English is learned
ELPS.c.4F use visual and contextual support and support from peers and teachers to read grade-appropriate content area text, enhance and confirm understanding, and develop vocabulary, grasp of language structures, and background knowledge needed to comprehend increasingly challenging language
ELPS.c.4G demonstrate comprehension of increasingly complex English by participating in shared reading, retelling or summarizing material, responding to questions, and taking notes commensurate with content area and grade level needs
ELPS.c.4H read silently with increasing ease and comprehension for longer periods
ELPS.c.4I demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing basic reading skills such as demonstrating understanding of supporting ideas and details in text and graphic sources, summarizing text, and distinguishing main ideas from details commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4J demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing inferential skills such as predicting, making connections between ideas, drawing inferences and conclusions from text and graphic sources, and finding supporting text evidence commensurate with content area needs
ELPS.c.4K demonstrate English comprehension and expand reading skills by employing analytical skills such as evaluating written information and performing critical analyses commensurate with content area and grade-level needs.
ELPS.c.5 The ELL writes in a variety of forms with increasing accuracy to effectively address a specific purpose and audience in all content areas. ELLs may be at the beginning, intermediate, advanced, or advanced high stage of English language acquisition in writing. In order for the ELL to meet grade-level learning expectations across foundation and enrichment curriculum, all instruction delivered in English must be linguistically accommodated (communicated, sequenced, and scaffolded) commensurate with the student's level of English language proficiency. For Kindergarten and Grade 1, certain of these student expectations do not apply until the student has reached the stage of generating original written text using a standard writing system. The student is expected to:
ELPS.c.5A learn relationships between sounds and letters of the English language to represent sounds when writing in English
ELPS.c.5B write using newly acquired basic vocabulary and content-based grade-level vocabulary
ELPS.c.5C spell familiar English words with increasing accuracy, and employ English spelling patterns and rules with increasing accuracy as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5D edit writing for standard grammar and usage, including subject-verb agreement, pronoun agreement, and appropriate verb tenses commensurate with grade-level expectations as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5E employ increasingly complex grammatical structures in content area writing commensurate with grade-level expectations, such as:
ELPS.c.5F write using a variety of grade-appropriate sentence lengths, patterns, and connecting words to combine phrases, clauses, and sentences in increasingly accurate ways as more English is acquired
ELPS.c.5G narrate, describe, and explain with increasing specificity and detail to fulfill content area writing needs as more English is acquired.
Last Updated 02/10/2017
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